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Definitions of fish

  1. seek indirectly; "fish for compliments" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. any of various mostly cold-blooded aquatic vertebrates usually having scales and breathing through gills; "the shark is a large fish"; "in the livingroom there was a tank of colorful fish" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the flesh of fish used as food; "in Japan most fish is eaten raw"; "after the scare about foot-and-mouth disease a lot of people started eating fish instead of meat"; "they have a chef who specializes in fish" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the twelfth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about February 19 to March 20 Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Pisces Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. catch or try to catch fish or shellfish; "I like to go fishing on weekends" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. A counter, used in various games. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A name loosely applied in popular usage to many animals of diverse characteristics, living in the water. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. An oviparous, vertebrate animal usually having fins and a covering scales or plates. It breathes by means of gills, and lives almost entirely in the water. See Pisces. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The twelfth sign of the zodiac; Pisces. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The flesh of fish, used as food. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A purchase used to fish the anchor. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A piece of timber, somewhat in the form of a fish, used to strengthen a mast or yard. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To attempt to catch fish; to be employed in taking fish, by any means, as by angling or drawing a net. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To seek to obtain by artifice, or indirectly to seek to draw forth; as, to fish for compliments. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To catch; to draw out or up; as, to fish up an anchor. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To search by raking or sweeping. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To try with a fishing rod; to catch fish in; as, to fish a stream. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To strengthen (a beam, mast, etc.), or unite end to end (two timbers, railroad rails, etc.) by bolting a plank, timber, or plate to the beam, mast, or timbers, lengthwise on one or both sides. See Fish joint, under Fish, n. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. of Finch Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To strengthen (a beam, mast, etc.), or unite end to end (two timbers, railroad rails, etc.) by bolting a plank, timber, or plate to the beam, mast, or timbers, lengthwise on one or both sides. See joint, under Fish, n. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A scaly animal living in water, breathing through gills instead of lungs; the flesh of fish used as food. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. To search in quest of fish; catch (fish); seek for and bring to light; draw up. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. To try to catch fish; seek to gain something by indirect methods. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. An animal that lives in water, and breathes through gills; the flesh of fish; -pl. FISH or FISHES. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. To search for fish; to search by sweeping; to draw out or up; to seek to obtain by artifice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. An animal living in the water and breathing by gills. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. To catch, or try to catch, fish; try to obtain by artifice. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. To search for fish, or as for fish; to draw out. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. To catch or try to catch, fish in (a stream or the like). The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. To catch, as fish, in or under water; search for and bring to light; often with up or out. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. To catch, or try to catch, fish; be employed in catching fish. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. A vertebrate animal with permanent gills, adapted to live under water. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Loosely, any animal habitually living in the water. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. An aquatic oviparous animal, respiring by means of gills; fishes in general; the flesh of fish, used as food; a counter used at cards; a piece of wood fastened to another to strengthen it; a fish-block. Craw-fish, crab-fish, and shell-fish, the crustaceans and testaceous mollusca. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. To try to catch fish in; to search by dragging or sweeping; to strengthen, as a mast or yard, with a piece of timber; to draw out or up. To fish out, to draw out by artifice. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. To try to catch fish, as by angling or drawing nets; to seek to obtain by artifice or indirectly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. of Fish Webster Dictionary DB
  39. An animal which inhabits the water, and breathes through gills; the flesh of a fish; a machine to hoist up the flukes of the anchor. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  40. To seek to catch fish; to seek to obtain by artifice; to search by raking; to draw out or up. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. Counter or marker at cards; a piece of wood secured to another to strengthen it. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. The Hebrews recognized fish as one of the great divisions of the animal kingdom, and as such gave them a place in the account of the creation, ( Genesis 1:21 Genesis 1:28 ) as well as in other passages where an exhaustive description of living creatures is intended. ( Genesis 9:2 ; Exodus 20:4 ; 4:18 ; 1 Kings 4:33 ) The Mosaic law, ( Leviticus 11:9 Leviticus 11:10 ) pronounced unclean such fish as were devoid of fins and scales; these were and are regarded as unwholesome in Egypt. Among the Philistines Dagon was represented by a figure half man and half fish. ( 1 Samuel 5:4 ) On this account the worship of fish is expressly prohibited. ( 4:18 ) In Palestine, the Sea of Galilee was and still is remarkable well stored with fish. (Tristram speaks of fourteen species found there, and thinks the number inhabiting it at least three times as great.) Jerusalem derived its supply chiefly from the Mediterranean. Comp. ( Ezekiel 47:10 ) The existence of a regular fish-market is implied in the notice of the fish-gate, which was probably contiguous to it. ( 2 Chronicles 33:14 ; Nehemiah 3:3 ; 12:39 ; Zephaniah 1:10 ) The Orientals are exceedingly fond of fish as an article of diet. Numerous allusions to the art of fishing occur in the Bible. The most usual method of catching fish was by the use of the net, either the casting net, ( Ezekiel 26:5 Ezekiel 26:14 ; 47:10 ); Habb 1:15 probably resembling the one used in Egypt, as shown in Wilkinson (iii. 55), or the draw or drag net, ( Isaiah 19:8 ); Habb 1:15 which was larger, and required the use of a boat. The latter was probably most used on the Sea of Galilee, as the number of boats kept on it was very considerable. biblestudytools.com
  43. An animal which Inhabits the water, breathes by means of gills, swims by theaid of fins, and is oviparous. thelawdictionary.org
  44. called dag by the Hebrews, a word denoting great fecundity ( Genesis 9:2 ; Numbers 11:22 ; Jonah 2:1 Jonah 2:10 ). No fish is mentioned by name either in the Old or in the New Testament. Fish abounded in the Mediterranean and in the lakes of the Jordan, so that the Hebrews were no doubt acquainted with many species. Two of the villages on the shores of the Sea of Galilee derived their names from their fisheries, Bethsaida (the "house of fish") on the east and on the west. There is probably no other sheet of water in the world of equal dimensions that contains such a variety and profusion of fish. About thirty-seven different kinds have been found. Some of the fishes are of a European type, such as the roach, the barbel, and the blenny; others are markedly African and tropical, such as the eel-like silurus. There was a regular fish-market apparently in Jerusalem ( 2 Chronicles 33:14 ; Nehemiah 3:3 ; 12:39 ; Zephaniah 1:10 ), as there was a fish-gate which was probably contiguous to it. Sidon is the oldest fishing establishment known in history. biblestudytools.com
  45. (Adelaide University, Australia) 1. Another metasyntacticvariable. See foo. Derived originally from the MontyPython skit in the middle of "The Meaning of Life" entitled"Find the Fish".2. microfiche. A microfiche file cabinet may bereferred to as a "fish tank". foldoc_fs
  46. fish, n. a vertebrate that lives in water, and breathes through gills: the flesh of fish: a piece of wood fixed alongside another for strengthening:--pl. FISH, or FISH'ES.--v.t. to search for fish: to search by sweeping: to draw out or up: (naut.) to strengthen, as a weak spar: to hoist the flukes of: to seek to obtain by artifice.--ns. FISH'-BALL, -CAKE, a ball of chopped fish and mashed potatoes, fried.--adj. FISH'-BELL'IED, swelled out downward like the belly of a fish.--ns. FISH'-CARV'ER, a large flat implement for carving fish at table--also Fish'-knife, Fish'-slice, and Fish'-trow'el; FISH'-COOP, a square box with a hole in its bottom, used in fishing through a hole in the ice; FISH'-CREEL, an angler's basket, a wicker-basket used for carrying fish; FISH'-DAY, a day on which fish is eaten instead of meat; FISH'ER, one who fishes, or whose occupation is to catch fish: a North American carnivore--a kind of marten or sable, the pekan or wood-shock; FISH'ERMAN, a fisher; FISH'ERY, the business of catching fish: a place for catching fish; FISH'-FAG, a woman who sells fish; FISH'-GARTH, an enclosure on a river for the preserving or taking of fish--also FISH'-WEIR; FISH'-GOD, a deity in form wholly or partly like a fish, like the Philistine Dagon; FISH'-HOOK, a barbed hook for catching fish.--v.t. FISH'IFY (Shak.), to turn to fish.--n. FISH'INESS.--adj. FISH'ING, used in fishery.--n. the art or practice of catching fish.--ns. FISH'ING-FROG, the angler-fish; FISH'ING-ROD, a long slender rod to which a line is fastened for angling; FISH'ING-TACK'LE, tackle--nets, lines, &c.--used in fishing; FISH'-JOINT, a joint or splice made with fish-plates; FISH'-KETT'LE, a long oval dish for boiling fish; FISH'-LADD'ER, FISH'-WAY, an arrangement for enabling a fish to ascend a fall, &c.; FISH'-LOUSE, a name widely applied to any of the Copepod crustaceans which occur as external parasites, both on fresh-water and marine fishes; FISH'-MEAL (Shak.), a meal of fish: abstemious diet; FISH'MONGER, a dealer in fish; FISH'-PACK'ING, the process of packing or canning fish for the market; FISH'-PLATE, an iron plate fitted to the web of a rail, used in pairs, one on each side of the junction of two rails; FISH'-POND, a pond in which fish are kept; FISH'-SALES'MAN, one who receives consignments of fish for sale by auction to retail dealers; FISH'-SAUCE, sauce proper to be eaten with fish, as anchovy, &c.; FISH'-SCRAP, fish or fish-skins from which oil or glue has been extracted; FISH'-SPEAR, a spear or dart for striking fish; FISH'-STRAIN'ER, a metal colander for taking fish from a boiler.--adj. FISH'-TAIL, shaped like the tail of a fish.--ns. FISH'-TORP[=E]'DO, a self-propelling torpedo; FISH'-WIFE, FISH'-WOM'AN, a woman who sells fish about the streets.--adj. FISH'Y, consisting of fish: like a fish: abounding in fish: dubious, as a story: equivocal, unsafe.--ns. BAIT'-FISH, such fish as are used for bait, fish that may be caught with bait; BOTT'OM-FISH, those that feed on the bottom, as halibut, &c.--FISH FOR, to seek to gain by cunning or indirect means; FISHERMAN'S LUCK, getting wet and catching no fish; FISHERMAN'S RING, a signet-ring with the device of St Peter fishing, used in signing papal briefs.--A QUEER FISH, a person of odd habits; BE NEITHER FISH NOR FLESH, or NEITHER FISH, FLESH, NOR FOWL, to be neither one thing nor another, in principle, &c.; HAVE OTHER FISH TO FRY, to have something else to do, or to take up one's mind; MAKE FISH OF ONE AND FLESH (or FOWL) OF ANOTHER, to make invidious distinctions, show undue partiality. [A.S. fisc; Ger. fisch; Ice. fiskr; L. piscis; Gr. ichthys; Gael. iasg.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  47. (pl. often fish). (Pop.) animal living in the water, (strictly) vertebrate cold-blooded animal having gills throughout life& limbs (if any) modified into fins, (pretty kettle of f., confusion, muddle; f. out of water, person out of his element; drunk, dull, mute, as a f.; drink like a f., excessively; feed the ff., be drowned, be sea-sick; all\'s f. that comes to his net, he takes all he can get; there\'s as good f. in the sea as ever came out of it, no fear of scarcity; FLAT, FLYING, Gold, JELLY, SHELL, SUN, SWORD, &c., -f.); person who is angled for; (colloq.) person of specified kind (cool, loose, queer, &c., f.); the flesh of f. (f., flesh, & fowl; neither f., flesh, nor good red herring, thing of indefinite character; other f. to fry, more important business to attend to); the French. or Ff., zodiac constellation; f.-carver, knife for serving f.; f.-globe, for keeping gold-f. &c. in; f.-glue, isinglass; f.-hook, used for catching f., (Naut.) part of anchor-raising tackle; f.-kettle, oval pan for boiling f.; f.-knije, of silver &c. for eating f.; f.-pond, in which f. are kept, (joc.) the sea; f.-pot, wicker trap for eels, lobsters, &c.; f.-slice, carving-knife for f., cook\'s implement for turning or taking out f.; f.-sound, f.\'s swimming-bladder; f.-tail, shaped like f.\'s tail (of jet of gas, whence f.-t. burner), f.-tail wind in rifle shooting, one blowing down range& varying in direction; f.-torpedo, torpedo shaped like f. & with automatic propulsion; fishwife, woman selling f. Hence fishlet, fishmonger, nn. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  48. Try to catch f. (f. in troubled waters, make one\'s profit out of disturbances), whence fishery (2,3) n.; search for something in or under water; seek by indirect means for (secrets, compliments, &c.), whence fishing a.; (rare) try to catch (f.) or get (coral &c.) from below water; draw out of water, pocket, &c., draw out; (Naut.)f. the anchor, draw flukes up to gunwale; try to catch f. in (pool &c.; f. out, exhaust the f. in), whence fishable a.; get (fact, opinion, secret) out; fishing-rod, long tapering usu. jointed rod to which fishing-line is attached. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  49. (Naut.) piece of wood, convex& concave, used to strengthen mast &c.; flat plate of iron, wood, &c., strengthening beam or joint (so f.-plate, one of two holding rails together); (vb) mend or strengthen (spar &c.), join (rails), with f. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  50. Piece of ivory &c. used as counter in games. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  51. A long spar, round on one side, hollowed on the other, bound to masts or yards to strengthen them. To F., to strengthen them thus. To F. the anchor, to turn it upside down for stowing. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  52. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Gothic, German, Latin] An animal that lives in water;—an oviparous, vertebrate animal, having a covering of scales or plates, and breathing by means of gills or branchiae, and living almost entirely in the water;—the flesh of fish, used as food. Cabinet Dictionary
  53. n. [French] A counter or marker at cards;—a piece of timber used to strengthen a mast or spar when sprung;—a machine for hoisting the flukes of the anchor to the bow. Cabinet Dictionary
  54. An animal that inhabits the water. Complete Dictionary

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