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Definitions of flag

  1. droop, sink, or settle from or as if from pressure or loss of tautness Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. become less intense Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a conspicuously marked or shaped tail Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. emblem usually consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth of distinctive design Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. stratified stone that splits into pieces suitable as paving stones Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. flagpole used to mark the position of the hole on a golf green Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a rectangular piece of fabric used as a signalling device Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. plants with sword-shaped leaves and erect stalks bearing bright-colored flowers composed of three petals and three drooping sepals Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. provide with a flag; "Flag this file so that I can recognize it immediately" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. communicate or signal with a flag Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a listing printed in all issues of a newspaper or magazine (usually on the editorial page) that gives the name of the publication and the names of the editorial staff, etc. Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. decorate with flags; "the building was flagged for the holiday" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To droop; to grow spiritless; to lose vigor; to languish; as, the spirits flag; the streugth flags. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness; as, to flag the wings. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To enervate; to exhaust the vigor or elasticity of. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. That which flags or hangs down loosely. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A cloth usually bearing a device or devices and used to indicate nationality, party, etc., or to give or ask information; -- commonly attached to a staff to be waved by the wind; a standard; a banner; an ensign; the colors; as, the national flag; a military or a naval flag. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of certain hawks, owls, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The bushy tail of a dog, as of a setter. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To signal to with a flag; as, to flag a train. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To convey, as a message, by means of flag signals; as, to flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. An aquatic plant, with long, ensiform leaves, belonging to either of the genera Iris and Acorus. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To furnish or deck out with flags. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A flat stone used for paving. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. Any hard, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers suitable for flagstones. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To lay with flags of flat stones. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To decoy (game) by waving a flag, handkerchief, or the like to arouse the animal's curiosity. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. One of the wing feathers next the body of a bird; - called also flag feather. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A piece of cloth or bunting on which usually some device is wrought, used as a standard, ensign, signal, etc.; a plant of the iris family; a flagstone or paving stone. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Signal with a flag; pave with fiagstones. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To become weary; lose vigor. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. Flagged. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. Flagging. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. Calamus. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  37. To grow languid or spiritless; -pr.p. flagging; pa.p. flagged. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. A water-plant. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. The ensign of a ship or of troops; a banner. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. Ensign; standard; plant with sword-shaped leaves; flat stone. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To grow languid; droop. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. To signal by a flag. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. To pave with flagstones. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. To grow languid; become tired; droop; drag. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. A Piece of cloth commonly bearing a device and attached to a staff or halyard; used as a standard, symbol, or signal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. A flagstone. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A plant having sword - shaped leaves and growing in moist places. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. An aquatic plant with a bladed leaf. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. An ensign or colour of a ship or of troops borne on a staff. To strike or lower the flag, to pull it down upon the capin token of respect or submission. A white flag, a flag of truce. A red flag, a sign of defiance or challenge to battle. A black flag, a sign of no quarter. Flag of truce, a flag carried to or by an enemy when some pacific communication is intended. To hang the flag half mast high, a signal of mourning. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. To suffer or to cause to droop. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. To lay with flat stones. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. To hang loose; to grow spiritless or languid; to droop; to become dull. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. A plant which grows in marshy places, having large-bladed or sword-shaped leaves; the sedge or iris. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. A piece of cloth on which is wrought some device, usually set upon a staff to wave in the wind; the ensign or colours of a regiment, ship, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  55. To grow spiritless or dejected; to lose vigour; to droop. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  56. A broad flat stone used for pavements. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  57. To lay with broad flat stones. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  58. There are two Hebrew words rendered "flag" in our Bible: 1. A word of Egyptian origin, and denoting "any green and course herbage, such as rushes and reeds, which grows in marshy places." ( Genesis 41:2 Genesis 41:18 ) (here translated meadow). It is perhaps the Cyperus esculentus . 2. A word which appears to be used in a very wide sense to denote "weeds of any kind." ( Exodus 2:3 Exodus 2:5 ; Isaiah 19:6 ) biblestudytools.com
  59. A national standard on which are certain emblems; an ensign; a banner. It iscarried by soldiers, ships, etc., and commonly displayed at forts and many othersuitable places. thelawdictionary.org
  60. (Heb., or rather Egyptian, ahu, Job 8:11 ), rendered "meadow" in Genesis 41:2 Genesis 41:18 ; probably the Cyperus esculentus, a species of rush eaten by cattle, the Nile reed. It also grows in Palestine. In Exodus 2:3 Exodus 2:5 , Isaiah 19:6 , it is the rendering of the Hebrew suph_, a word which occurs frequently in connection with _yam ; as yam suph , to denote the "Red Sea" (q.v.) or the sea of weeds (as this word is rendered, Jonah 2:5 ). It denotes some kind of sedge or reed which grows in marshy places. (See PAPER, REED .) biblestudytools.com
  61. 1. A variable or quantity that can take on oneof two values; a bit, particularly one that is used toindicate one of two outcomes or is used to control which oftwo things is to be done. "This flag controls whether toclear the screen before printing the message." "The programstatus word contains several flag bits." See also hiddenflag, mode bit.2. command line option. foldoc_fs
  62. flag, v.i. to grow languid or spiritless.--pr.p. flag'ging; pa.p. flagged.--n. FLAG'GINESS.--adj. FLAG'GY, limp, flabby. [Perh. O. Fr. flac--L. flaccus; prob. influenced by imit. forms as flap.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  63. flag, n. a popular name for many plants with sword-shaped leaves, mostly growing in moist situations, sometimes specially the species of iris or flower-de-luce--esp. the yellow flag: the acorus or sweet flag: (B.) reed-grass.--ns. FLAG'-BAS'KET, a basket made of reeds for carrying tools; FLAG'GINESS.--adj. FLAG'GY, abounding in flags.--n. FLAG'-WORM, a worm or grub bred among flags or reeds. [Ety. obscure; cf. Dut. flag.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  64. flag, n. the ensign of a ship or of troops: a banner.--v.t. to decorate with flags: to inform by flag-signals.--ns. FLAG'-CAP'TAIN, in the navy, the captain of the ship which bears the admiral's flag; FLAG'-LIEUTEN'ANT, an officer in a flag-ship, corresponding to an aide-de-camp in the army; FLAG'-OFF'ICER, a naval officer privileged to carry a flag denoting his rank--admiral, vice-admiral, rear-admiral, or commodore; FLAG'-SHIP, the ship in which an admiral sails, and which carries his flag; FLAG'STAFF, a staff or pole on which a flag is displayed.--FLAG OF DISTRESS, a flag displayed as a signal of distress--usually upside down or at half-mast; FLAG OF TRUCE, a white flag displayed during war when some pacific communication is intended between the hostile parties; BLACK FLAG, a pirate's flag, pirates generally; DIP THE FLAG, to lower the flag and then hoist it--a token of respect; HANG OUT THE RED FLAG, to give a challenge to battle; STRIKE, or LOWER, THE FLAG, to pull it down as a token of respect, submission, or surrender; WHITE FLAG, an emblem of peace; YELLOW FLAG, hoisted to show pestilence on board, also over ships, &c., in quarantine, and hospitals, &c., in time of war. [Prob. Scand.; Dan. flag; Dut. vlag, Ger. flagge.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  65. flag, n. a stone that separates in flakes or layers: a flat stone used for paving--also FLAG'STONE.--v.t. to pave with flagstones.--n. FLAG'GING, flagstones: a pavement of flagstones. [A form of flake; Ice. flaga, a flag or slab.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  66. Kinds of plant with bladed leaf growing on moist ground, esp. various species of iris; ff. or f. collect., kind of coarse grass; long slender blade of a plant. Hence flaggy a. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  67. (Also flagstone) flat slab of rock for paving, (pl.) pavement made of these, also flagging (6) n.; (vb) pave with ff. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. (Also f.-feather) quill-feather of bird\'s wing. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  69. Piece of bunting or other stuff, usu. oblong or square, attached by one edge to staff or halyard& used as standard, ensign, or signal (black f., pirate\'s ensign, also f. hoisted outside prison to announce execution of criminal; Black Ff., irregular Chinese soldiers, orig. rebels, in Tonquin; white f., f. of truce, f. disclaiming hostile intention; yellow f., displayed by ship with infectious disease on board, hospital ship, or ship in quarantine; f. of truce, white, indicating desire to parley; DIP f.; lower or strike one\'s f., take it down as salute or sign of surrender); (Naut.) f. carried by flagship as emblem of admiral\'s rank afloat (hoist, strike, one\'s f., assume, relinquish, command); tail of setter or Newfoundland dog; f.-boat, serving as mark in aquatic matches; f.-captain, captain of flagship; f.-lieutenant, admiral\'s A.D.C.; f.-list, roll of f.-officers, i.e. admirals, vice-admirals, or rear-admirals; flagman, signaller at races &c.; flagship, having admiral on board; flagstaff, pole on which f. is hung; f.-station, where trains stop only if signalled; f.-wagging (mil. slang), signalling; f.-waver, agitator. (Vb) place f. on or over; mark out with ff.; inform (person), communicate (information, that), by f.-signals. [English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  70. Hang down, flap loosely; droop, fade, become limp; lag, lose vigour, grow languid; fall off in interest. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  71. The Stars and Stripes gradually grew; it was a creature of circumstance; there is no record of its birth. Among the colonies the British was, of course, the recognized standard. Here and there were minor modifications, but the retention of the " union " with its two crosses of St. Andrew and St. George marked all as essentially British. Even after the beginning of the Revolution the union was retained to show that the war did not mean separation. Congress made at first no effort to fix a national standard. There were two classes of flags in vogue in the early years of the Revolution, the " pine tree " flags of New England origin, and the " rattlesnake " flag, more national in its make-up. The latter was white with a rattlesnake cut into thirteen pieces, each marked with the initial of a colony, and the legend Join, or die. The need of a national flag became evident in 1775. The stripes were first used by a Philadelphia light-horse troop, and Congress adopted them in 1775 on the recommendation of a committee consisting of Franklin, Lynch and Harrison, still retaining the British "union." This flag was raised over the American headquarters at Cambridge, Mass., January i or 2, 1776. After the Declaration of Independence, Congress, June 14, 1777, ordered the "union" to be displaced by thirteen stars. It was first displayed at the battle of Brandywine, September 11, 1777. On the admission of Vermont and Kentucky, 1794, two new stripes were added, but by the Act of April 4, 1818, the number of stripes was limited to thirteen, the number of stars increasing with the number of the States. (See also Revenue Flag and Stars and Bars.) Dictionary of United States history
  72. (Naut.) Taking a Flag to be oblong, the Cornet is a swallow-tailed F., in signalling called a Burgee; which, otherwise, tapers either to a point (and is then, in signalling, a Pennant) or to a pair of swallow-tails, which latter is the shape of a Broad pennant. In the R.N. , a Pennant, Whiff, or Whip is flown at the masthead, and is lengthened according to a ship's Flag-time, i.e. period of foreign service. The leading British nautical flags are as follows :- 1. The National F., viz. (1) the Union Jack, a combination, heraldically incorrect, of the crosses of St. George, St. Andrew, and St. Patrick, with a broad white border ; and (2) the Red Ensign. 2. The Blue E., restricted to the Naval Reserve, certain Government services, and Royal Yacht Clubs. 3. The White E. with a red cross, or St. George's E., is restricted to the R.N. and the R.Y. squadron. Each E. bears in the upper corner next the mast the U.J., the use of which, undifferenced, is similarly restricted to the R. N., where it is flown in the bows, but by the admiral of the fleet at the main. 4. Admirals, Vice-A., and Rear-A. fly the old English colour, or St. George's Jack, i.e. plain white with plain red cross, at the main, fore, and mizzen, respectively; formerly they flew the R., the W., and the B. E. respectively; rank in each division being further denoted by the mast at which each E. was flown. A commodore flies a Broad pennant at the main or fore, according to his class ; all of a lower rank fly the ordinary White E. at the peak or flagstaff. 5. The Pennant, flown by all ships in commission, White for the R.N., and Blue for armed Colonials, etc., bear a St. George's cross next the mast. There are many other British flags appropriated to various services, colonies, and dependencies ; as the Royal Standard, showing that one of the royal family is on board ; the Red E. with the Dominion arms in the fly for Canada ; the Green, Red, White Tricolour (horizontal), with the U. J. in the upper corner next the mast, for Heligoland. Some foreign merchantmen's flags are subjoined. War and governmental F. vary, sometimes very widely, from merchantmen. France: blue, white, red. Italy : green, white, red. Belgium : black, yellow, red. Portugal: blue, white ; all vertical, and reckoned from the mast outward. Holland: red, white, blue. Russia : white, blue, red. Germany: black, white, red. Spain: yellow, red, yellow, red, yellow. Austria: red, white, with two coats of arms, half red and half green. Greece: five blue, four white, with Jack in corner; all horizontal, and reckoned from the top downward. Denmark: red with white cross. Norway : red with blue cross, and Jack in corner. Sweden: blue with yellow cross, and Jack in corner. U. S. A. : red and white horizontal stripes, with white stars on blue ground in corner, corresponding in number to the states in the Union. Turkey: green, with white crescent on red central disc, Egypt: red, with white crescent and three stars. The terms Flag and Pennant are sometimes used to denote admiral and commodore respectively. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  73. n. [German] A flat stone used for paving. Cabinet Dictionary
  74. n. An aquatic plant with long ensiform leaves. Cabinet Dictionary
  75. n. [German, Icelandic, Dutch] An ensign or colours; a banner; a standard; a signal;—in the army, a banner by which one regiment is distinguished from another;—in the marine service, a standard by which the ships of one nation are distinguished from another;—in the British navy, a banner denoting the rank of the officer in command of the fleet—an admiral flies his flag at the main topgallant mast head, a vice-admiral at the fore, and a rear-admiral at the mizzen; and there is a further gradation in rank noted by the colour of the flag, red, white, or blue. Cabinet Dictionary
  76. A water plant with a broad bladed leaf and yellow flower; the colours or ensign of a ship or land-forces; a species of stone used for smooth pavements. Complete Dictionary

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