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Definitions of flame

  1. the process of combustion of inflammable materials producing heat and light and (often) smoke; "fire was one of our ancestors' first discoveries" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. shine with a sudden light; "The night sky flared with the massive bombardment" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. criticize harshly, on the e-mail Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. be in flames or aflame; "The sky seemed to flame in the Hawaiian sunset" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. A stream of burning vapor or gas, emitting light and heat; darting or streaming fire; a blaze; a fire. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Burning zeal or passion; elevated and noble enthusiasm; glowing imagination; passionate excitement or anger. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Ardor of affection; the passion of love. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A person beloved; a sweetheart. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To burn with a flame or blaze; to burn as gas emitted from bodies in combustion; to blaze. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To burst forth like flame; to break out in violence of passion; to be kindled with zeal or ardor. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To kindle; to inflame; to excite. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To inflame; to excite. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. A burning gas or vapor; ardor; glow of imagination; excitement; a sweetheart. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To burst into flame; blaze. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. The gleam or blaze of a fire; rage; ardor of temper; vigor of thought; warmth of affection; love. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. To burn as flame; to break out in passion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. FLAMELESS. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. Burning gas; blaze; ardor; passion. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. To blaze; shine like fire; burst into passion. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. To Blaze; shine like a flame; flash. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. To burst forth, as in violence of passion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. A stream of vapor or gas made luminous by heat; a blaze. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Excitement, as from rage, strife, or passion; an ardent affection; passionate love. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. Vapour in combustion, glowing with light and heat; fire in general; heat or bluze of passion or excitement; violent contention; ardour of temper; glow of imagination; vigour of thought; warmth of affection; one beloved. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To blaze; to shine like burning gas; to break out in violence of passion. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. A blaze; fire in general; combustion of gas or vapour; heat of passion; warmth of affection; love; violence; one beloved. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. To blaze; to burn, as a gas; to break out into violence. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. Emails sent to an article author with controversial statement. Refer to mail bomb. thelawdictionary.org
  29. To rant, to speak or write incessantly and/orrabidly on some relatively uninteresting subject or with apatently ridiculous attitude or with hostility toward aparticular person or group of people. "Flame" is used as averb ("Don't flame me for this, but..."), a flame is a singleflaming message, and "flamage" /flay'm*j/ the content.Flamage may occur in any medium (e.g. spoken, electronicmail, Usenet news, World-Wide Web). Sometimes a flamewill be delimited in text by marks such as "<flameon>...".The term was probably independently invented at severaldifferent places.Mark L. Levinson says, "When I joined the Harvard studentradio station (WHRB) in 1966, the terms flame and flamer werealready well established there to refer to impolite rantingand to those who performed it. Communication among thestudents who worked at the station was by means of what todayyou might call a paper-based Usenet group. Everyone wrotecomments to one another in a large ledger. Documentaryevidence for the early use of flame/flamer is probably stillthere for anyone fanatical enough to research it."It is reported that "flaming" was in use to mean somethinglike "interminably drawn-out semi-serious discussions" (late-night bull sessions) at Carleton College during1968-1971.Usenetter Marc Ramsey, who was at WPI from 1972 to 1976,says: "I am 99% certain that the use of "flame" originated atWPI. Those who made a nuisance of themselves insisting thatthey needed to use a TTY for "real work" came to be known as"flaming asshole lusers". Other particularly annoying peoplebecame "flaming asshole ravers", which shortened to "flamingravers", and ultimately "flamers". I remember someone pickingup on the Human Torch pun, but I don't think "flame on/off"was ever much used at WPI." See also asbestos.It is possible that the hackish sense of "flame" is much olderthan that. The poet Chaucer was also what passed for a wizardhacker in his time; he wrote a treatise on the astrolabe, themost advanced computing device of the day. In Chaucer's"Troilus and Cressida", Cressida laments her inability tograsp the proof of a particular mathematical theorem; heruncle Pandarus then observes that it's called "the fleminge ofwrecches." This phrase seems to have been intended in contextas "that which puts the wretches to flight" but was probablyjust as ambiguous in Middle English as "the flaming ofwretches" would be today. One suspects that Chaucer wouldfeel right at home on Usenet. foldoc_fs
  30. fl[=a]m, n. gaseous matter undergoing combustion: the gleam or blaze of a fire: rage: ardour of temper: vigour of thought: warmth of affection: love: (coll.) the object of love.--v.i. to burn as flame: to break out in passion.--adjs. FL[=A]ME'-COL'OURED (Shak.), of the colour of flame, bright yellow; FL[=A]ME'LESS.--n. FL[=A]ME'LET, a small flame.--adj. FL[=A]M'ING, red: gaudy: violent.--adv. FL[=A]M'INGLY.--n. FLAMMABIL'ITY.--adjs. FLAMMIF'EROUS, producing flame; FLAMMIV'OMOUS, vomiting flames.--n. FLAM'MULE, the flames in pictures of Japanese deities.--adj. FL[=A]M'Y, pertaining to, or like, flame. [O. Fr. flambe--L. flamma--flagr[=a]re, to burn.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  31. (Portion of) ignited gas (the ff., fire, esp. as consuming); visible combustion (in ff.; burst into f. or ff.); bright light, brilliant colouring; passion, esp. of love (fan the f., make it more intense); (joc.) sweetheart (an old f. of mine); kinds of moth. Hence flameless (poet.), flamy, aa. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  32. Emit ff., blaze, (often away, forth, out, up); (of passion) burst out; (of persons) break out, blaze up, into anger; shine, gleam, (f. up, blush violently); move like f.; send (signal) by flaming; subject to action of f. (sterilized by flaming). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  33. n. [Latin] A stream of burning vapour or gas; a blaze; fire in general;—burning zeal or passion; fervency; passionate excitement or strife;—warmth of affection;—a sweetheart. Cabinet Dictionary
  34. Light emitted from fire; a stream of fire; ardour of temper or imagination, brightness of fancy; ardour of inclination; passion of love. Complete Dictionary

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