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Definitions of flap

  1. To move as wings, with a flap; to fall, as the brim of a hat or other broad thing. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To strike, or strike at, as with a wing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To move to and fro rapidly, as wings; swing or wave; droop. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To stlike with, or as with, a flap; let fall; wave backwards and forwards rapidly and with a loose motion. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To beat with or as with a flap; to move, as something broad or flap-like; "The raven flapped his wing."-Tickell; to let fail the flap of, as a hat. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To move or strike with a flap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. To move as do wings, or as something broad or loose; to fly with wings beating the air. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To fall and hang like a flap, as the brim of a hat, or other broad thing. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To move, as wings, with noise. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To move as wings, or as something broad or loose; "The slackened sail flaps."-Tennyson; to fall like a flap, as the brim of a hat or other broad thing; to have the flap fall; "He had an old black hat on that flapped."-State Trials. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. To move or hang as a flap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. pronounce with a flap, of alveolar sounds Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. move noisily; "flags flapped in the strong wind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. move in a wavy pattern, as of curtains Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. Anything broad and limber that hangs loose, or that is attached by one side or end and is easily moved; as, the flap of a garment. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A hinged leaf, as of a table or shutter. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The motion of anything broad and loose, or a stroke or sound made with it; as, the flap of a sail or of a wing. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A disease in the lips of horses. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. To beat or move with a flap; to let fall, as the brim of a hat. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. To move, as wings; to move or fall, as something loose; to beat with a flap. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. Flapping. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. any broad thin and limber covering attached at one edge; hangs loose or projects freely; "he wrote on the flap of the envelope" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. a movable airfoil that is part of an aircraft wing; used to increase lift or drag Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. a movable piece of tissue partly connected to the body Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion; "The curtains undulated"; "the waves rolled towards the beach" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. move with a flapping motion; "The bird's wings were flapping" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. To beat with a flap; to strike. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To move, as something broad and flaplike; as, to flap the wings; to let fall, as the brim of a hat. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Anything broad and fiat hanging loosely, and fastened on one side; the motion or noise of anything broad and flat; a slap; the tail of a coat. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Anything broad and flexible that hangs loose or is attached by one end or side and easily moved; as, the flap of a garment; the flap of the ear; the flap of a hat; "Embroidered waistcoats with large flaps."-Dickens; "A cartilaginous flap on the opening of the larynx."-Sir T. Brown; the motion of anything broad and loose, or a stroke with it:-pl. a disease in the lips of horses, in which they become blistered and swell on both sides. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. Anything broad and flexible hanging loose; blow, motion, or noise of such a body. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. A broad, limber, and loosely hanging part or attachment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. The act of flapping; a light blow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Flapper. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Anything broad and flexible that hangs loose; the motion and noise of it, as a loose sail in the wind; the tail of a coat. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. Anything broad, hanging loose, and easily moved; the motion and noise of it, as sails against the mast; tail of a coat. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. Flapped. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for flap?

Usage examples for flap

  1. The wind that was moaning over the sea swept up the road and caused something to flap around the shoulders of this figure like a great pair of wings. – Frank Merriwell's Chums by Burt L. Standish
  2. Then she ran her finger under the flap and read the contents. – A Daughter of the Land by Gene Stratton-Porter
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