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Definitions of flap

  1. an excited state of agitation; "he was in a dither"; "there was a terrible flap about the theft" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. make a fuss; be agitated Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. move with a thrashing motion; "The bird flapped its wings"; "The eagle beat its wings and soared high into the sky" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. any broad thin and limber covering attached at one edge; hangs loose or projects freely; "he wrote on the flap of the envelope" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a movable airfoil that is part of an aircraft wing; used to increase lift or drag Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a movable piece of tissue partly connected to the body Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the motion made by flapping up and down Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. pronounce with a flap, of alveolar sounds Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. move noisily; "flags flapped in the strong wind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. move in a wavy pattern, as of curtains Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion; "The curtains undulated"; "the waves rolled towards the beach" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. move with a flapping motion; "The bird's wings were flapping" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. Anything broad and limber that hangs loose, or that is attached by one side or end and is easily moved; as, the flap of a garment. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A hinged leaf, as of a table or shutter. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The motion of anything broad and loose, or a stroke or sound made with it; as, the flap of a sail or of a wing. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A disease in the lips of horses. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To beat with a flap; to strike. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To move, as something broad and flaplike; as, to flap the wings; to let fall, as the brim of a hat. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To move as do wings, or as something broad or loose; to fly with wings beating the air. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To fall and hang like a flap, as the brim of a hat, or other broad thing. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Tongues of tissue (skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle) cut away from the underlying parts but attached at one end. They retain their own blood supply during transfer to the new site. They are used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region. The concept includes pedicled flaps, rotation flaps, tube flaps, etc. Medical Dictionary DB
  22. Anything broad and fiat hanging loosely, and fastened on one side; the motion or noise of anything broad and flat; a slap; the tail of a coat. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. To stlike with, or as with, a flap; let fall; wave backwards and forwards rapidly and with a loose motion. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. To move, as wings, with noise. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Flapped. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Flapping. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. A tongue or lip of tissue, cut away from the underlying parts but attached at one end; used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region, or to cover the sawn end of the bone after amputation. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  28. Tissue and skin partly separated from body by cutting under it with a knife. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  29. Anything broad and flexible that hangs loose or is attached by one end or side and easily moved; as, the flap of a garment; the flap of the ear; the flap of a hat; "Embroidered waistcoats with large flaps."-Dickens; "A cartilaginous flap on the opening of the larynx."-Sir T. Brown; the motion of anything broad and loose, or a stroke with it:-pl. a disease in the lips of horses, in which they become blistered and swell on both sides. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To beat with or as with a flap; to move, as something broad or flap-like; "The raven flapped his wing."-Tickell; to let fail the flap of, as a hat. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. To move as wings, or as something broad or loose; "The slackened sail flaps."-Tennyson; to fall like a flap, as the brim of a hat or other broad thing; to have the flap fall; "He had an old black hat on that flapped."-State Trials. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. Anything broad and flexible hanging loose; blow, motion, or noise of such a body. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To move or hang as a flap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To move or strike with a flap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To strike, or strike at, as with a wing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. To move to and fro rapidly, as wings; swing or wave; droop. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A broad, limber, and loosely hanging part or attachment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The act of flapping; a light blow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. Flapper. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. Anything broad and flexible that hangs loose; the motion and noise of it, as a loose sail in the wind; the tail of a coat. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To beat or move with a flap; to let fall, as the brim of a hat. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To move as wings, with a flap; to fall, as the brim of a hat or other broad thing. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. Anything broad, hanging loose, and easily moved; the motion and noise of it, as sails against the mast; tail of a coat. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. To move, as wings; to move or fall, as something loose; to beat with a flap. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. A symbolic mathematics package for IBM 360.["FLAP Programmer's Manual", A.H. Morris Jr., TR-2558 (1971)US Naval Weapons Lab].[Sammet 1969, p. 506]. foldoc_fs
  46. 1. To unload a DECtape (so it goes flap,flap, flap). Old-time hackers at MIT tell of the dayswhen the disk was device 0 and microtapes were 1, 2,etc. and attempting to flap device 0 would instead start amotor banging inside a cabinet near the disk.The term is used, by extension, for unloading any magnetictape. See also macrotape. Modern cartridge tapes nolonger actually flap, but the usage has remained.The term could well be re-applied to DEC's TK50 cartridgetape drive, a spectacularly misengineered contraption whichmakes a loud flapping sound, almost like an old reel-typelawnmower, in one of its many tape-eating failure modes.2. See flapping router. foldoc_fs
  47. flap, n. the blow or motion of a broad loose object: anything broad and flexible hanging loose, as the tail of a coat: a portion of skin or flesh detached from the underlying part for covering and growing over the end of an amputated limb.--v.t. to beat or move with a flap.--v.i. to move, as wings: to hang like a flap:--pr.p. flap'ping; pa.p. flapped.--ns. FLAP'DOODLE, the food of fools: transparent nonsense, gross flattery, &c.; FLAP'-DRAG'ON, a play in which small edibles, as raisins, are snatched from burning brandy, and swallowed.--v.t. (Shak.) to swallow or devour, as in flap-dragon.--adj. FLAP'-EARED (Shak.), having ears hanging like a flap.--n. FLAP'-JACK (Shak.), a kind of broad, flat pancake.--adj. FLAP'-MOUTHED.--n. FLAP'PER. [Prob. imit.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. A portion of the soft parts of the body separated from those beneath, but still attached by the base. Hence there may be' flap wounds,' (F.) Plaies a lamleaux, and 'flap operations,' (F.) Operations a lambeaux. When the flap is taken from one part, and applied to another, in plastic operations, the operation is said to be by migration of the flap, (F.) Migration du Lambeau. At times, the flap is made to slide over the part to which it has to adhere: - the operation is then said to be by the sliding of the flap, (F.) Glissement du Lambeau. The flap is also, at times, rolled, inverted, &c, (F.) Roulement ou Inversion du Lambeau. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  49. Strike with something broad, drive (flies &c.) away or off; (of birds) strike (something) with flat of wing; swing or sway about, flutter, oscillate; move (t. & i. of wings) up& down; beat the wings. (N.) light blow with something broad; motion of wing &c.; broad hanging piece hinged or attached by one side only, e.g. trapdoor, pocket-cover, hat-brim, table-leaf, valve, fish\'s gill-cover, piece of skin left in amputations; open mushroom-top (cf. button). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  50. A mass of tissue partly detached by the knife. American pocket medical dictionary.
  51. A portion of tissue, as skin, muscle, or fascia, separated from the underlying part, but remaining attached at the base. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  52. n. [Dutch, Danish, Latin] Any thing broad and limber that hangs loose, or attached by one side or end and easily moved;—the motion of anything broad and loose, or a stroke with it;—a disease in the lips of horses. Cabinet Dictionary
  53. Any thing that hangs broad and loose; the motion of any thing broad and loose; the noise made by that motion; a disease in horses. Complete Dictionary

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