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Definitions of flax

  1. fiber of the flax plant that is made into thread and woven into linen fabric Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. plant of the genus Linum that is cultivated for its seeds and for the fibers of its stem Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. A plant of the genus Linum, esp. the L. usitatissimum, which has a single, slender stalk, about a foot and a half high, with blue flowers. The fiber of the bark is used for making thread and cloth, called linen, cambric, lawn, lace, etc. Linseed oil is expressed from the seed. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. The skin or fibrous part of the flax plant, when broken and cleaned by hatcheling or combing. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Any plant of the genus Linum, especially Linum usitatissimum, an annual cultivated for its fiber (manufactured into linen yarn for thread and woven fabrics) and for its seeds, flaxseed, yielding flaxseed oil (also called LINSEED OIL). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed) Medical Dictionary DB
  6. A slender plant with blue flowers, from the fiber of which linen is made; the fiber of the plant ready to be spun. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. Linum. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  8. The common name of the plants of the genus Linum, nat. order Linaceae, and of the fibre produced from it. The species, of which there are nearly a hundred, are herbs or small shrubs, with narrow leaves, and yellow, blue, or even white flowers arranged in variously formed cymes. They occur in warm and temperate regions over the world. The cultivated species is L. usitatissimum. The fibre which is used for making thread and cloth, called linen, cambric, lawn, lace, etc., consists of the woody bundles of the slender stalks. The fine fibres may be so separated as to be spun into threads as fine as silk. A most useful oil is expressed from the seeds, and the residue, called linseed cake, is one of the most fattening kinds of food for cattle. The best seed comes from Riga and Holland. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. Vegetable fibres of which linen is made; plant producing these fibres. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. The soft fiber obtained from the bark of the flax-plant. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. An annual plant having a mucilaginous seed, called flaxseed or linseed, and a fibrous inner bark. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. An annual plant, the stalks of which yield a fibre which is used for making thread and cloth, such as linen, cambric, lawn, lace, &c.; the fibrous part of the plant when broken and cleaned. Flaxweed, a weed like flax. New Zealand flax or flax-lily, the phormium of naturalists, the leaves of which yield a very beautiful and strong fibre, used in the manufacture of ropes and other cordage. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. A plant; the prepared fibres or threads of the same which are made into linen cloth. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. a well-known plant with yellowish stem and bright-blue flowers. Its fibres are employed in the manufacture of linen. The root contains an oil, and after the oil is expressed is sued as a food for cattle. Egypt was celebrated for the culture of flax and the manufacture of linen. The spinning was anciently done by women of noble birth. It seems probable that the cultivation of flax for the purpose of the manufacture of linen was by no means confined to Egypt, but that, originating in India, it spread over Asia at a very early period of antiquity. That it was grown in Palestine even before the conquest of that country by the Israelites appears from ( Joshua 2:6 ) The various processes employed in preparing the flax for manufacture into cloth are indicated: 1. The drying process. 2. The peeling of the stalks and separation of the fibres. 3. The hackling. ( Isaiah 19:9 ) That flax was one of the most important crops in Palestine appears from ( Hosea 2:5 Hosea 2:9 ) biblestudytools.com
  15. (Heb. pishtah, i.e., "peeled", in allusion to the fact that the stalks of flax when dried were first split or peeled before being steeped in water for the purpose of destroying the pulp). This plant was cultivated from earliest times. The flax of Egypt was destroyed by the plague of hail when it "was bolled", i.e., was forming pods for seed ( Exodus 9:31 ). It was extensively cultivated both in Egypt and Palestine. Reference is made in Joshua 2:6 to the custom of drying flax-stalks by exposing them to the sun on the flat roofs of houses. It was much used in forming articles of clothing such as girdles, also cords and bands ( Leviticus 13:48 Leviticus 13:52 Leviticus 13:59 ; Deuteronomy 22:11 ). (See LINEN .) biblestudytools.com
  16. flax, n. the fibres of the plant Linum, which are woven into linen cloth: the flax-plant.--ns. FLAX'-COMB, a toothed instrument or heckle for cleaning the fibres of flax; FLAX'-DRESS'ER, one who prepares flax for the spinner by the successive processes of rippling, retting, grassing, breaking, and scutching.--adj. FLAX'EN, made of or resembling flax: fair, long, and flowing.--ns. FLAX'-MILL, a mill for working flax into linen; FLAX'-SEED, linseed; FLAX'-WENCH, a female who spins flax.--adj. FLAX'Y, like flax: of a light colour.--NEW ZEALAND FLAX, a valuable fibre, quite different from common flax, obtained from the leaf of Phormium tenax, the flax lily or flax bush. [A.S. fleax; Ger. flachs.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  17. Blue-flowered plant cultivated for its textile fibre& its seeds called linseed; (with qualifying word prefixed or suffixed) kinds of similar plant, as dwarf, toad,-f.,f.-lily,-dodder; fibres of f., dressed or undressed; cloth of f., linen; f.-seed, linseed. [West German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  18. n. [Anglo-Saxon, German] A plant having a single, slender stalk, about a foot and a half high, with blue flowers. The fibre of the bark is used for making thread and doth, called linen, cambric, lawn, lace, &c. Linseed oil is expressed from the seed;—the fibrous part of the flax plant, when broken and cleaned by hatcheling or combing. Cabinet Dictionary
  19. The fibrous plant of which the finest thread is made; the fibres of flax cleansed and combed from the spinner. Complete Dictionary

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