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Definitions of floor

  1. To cover with a floor; to furnish with a floor; as, to floor a house with pine boards. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To strike down or lay level with the floor; to knock down; hence, to silence by a conclusive answer or retort; as, to floor an opponent. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To finish or make an end of; as, to floor a college examination. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To cover with a floor; strike down; hence, put to silence. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To cover with a floor; to furnish with a floor; as, to floor a house with pine boards; to strike down or lay level with the floor; to beat; to conquer; as, to floor an antagonist; (fig.) to put to silence by some decisive argument, retort, etc.; to overcome in any way; to overthrow; “One question floored successively almost every witness in favor of abolition to whom it was addressed."-Sat. Rev.; “The express object of his visit was to know how he could knock religion over and floor the Established Church."-Dickens: to go through; to make an end of; to finish; “I've floored my little-go work.”-Hughes; “I have a few bottles of old wine left, we may as well floor them.”-Macmillan's Mag. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To furnish with a floor. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. To provide with a floor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. To throw to the floor; overthrow; vanquish. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. knock down with force; "He decked his opponent" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. To furnish with a floor; to strike down; to beat; to put down or silence by some decisive argument; to finish. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To lay with a floor; to knock down; to silence an opponent. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12. structure consisting of a room or set of rooms comprising a single level of a multilevel building; "what level is the office on?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a large room in a stock exchange where the trading is done; "he is a floor trader" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. the legislative hall where members debate and vote and conduct other business; "there was a motion from the floor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. the parliamentary right to address an assembly; "the chairman granted him the floor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. the occupants of a floor; "the whole floor complained about the lack of heat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. the bottom surface of any a cave or lake etc. Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. the ground on which people and animals move about; "the fire spared the forest floor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. The bottom or lower part of any room; the part upon which we stand and upon which the movables in the room are supported. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The structure formed of beams, girders, etc., with proper covering, which divides a building horizontally into stories. Floor in sense 1 is, then, the upper surface of floor in sense 2. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. The surface, or the platform, of a structure on which we walk or travel; as, the floor of a bridge. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A story of a building. See Story. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The part of the house assigned to the members. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The right to speak. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The rock underlying a stratified or nearly horizontal deposit. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A horizontal, flat ore body. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The bottom surface of a room or house on which one treads; story of a house; a level suite or set of rooms; any smooth or level area; pavement; the part of a legislative or lawmaking chamber occupied by the members. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. That part of a building or room on which we walk; the bottom or lower part, consisting in modern houses of boards, planks, pavement, asphalte, etc.; a platform of boards or planks laid on timbers, as in a bridge; any similar platform; a story in a building; a suite of rooms on a level; as, the first or second floor; (naut.) that part of the bottom of a vessel on each side of the keelson which is most nearly horizontal; in legislative assemblies, the part of the house assigned to the members. (U.S.)-TO HAVE OR GET THE FLOOR, in the United States Congress. to have or obtain an opportunity of taking part in a debate; equivalent to the English phrase, to be in possession of the house. "Mr. T. claimed that he had the floor."-New York Herald. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Bottom of a room; platform; story of a house. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. The bottom surface in a room or building; also, a story. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Space appropriated to members; the right to speak. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. That part of a building or room on which we walk; a platform, as of boards or planks laid on timbers; a story in a building; the bottom of a vessel on each side of the keelson, nearly horizontal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. That part of a house or room on which we walk; a story; a series of rooms on the same level. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for floor?

Usage examples for floor

  1. Thee must not expect thy floor to keep just so, Sukey, when there is so much company. – Peggy Owen and Liberty by Lucy Foster Madison
  2. I shall certainly go through the floor if papa says anything more. – Entire PG Edition of The Works of William Dean Howells by William Dean Howells
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