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Definitions of fly

  1. pass away rapidly; "Time flies like an arrow"; "Time fleeing beneath him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. display in the air or cause to float; "fly a kite"; "All nations fly their flags in front of the U.N." Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (baseball) a hit that flies high in the air Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. two-winged insects characterized by active flight Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an opening in a garment that is closed by a zipper or buttons concealed by a fold of cloth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. fisherman's lure consisting of a fishhook decorated to look like an insect Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. flap consisting of a piece of canvas that can be drawn back to provide entrance to a tent Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. (British informal) not to be deceived or hoodwinked Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. decrease rapidly, as of money Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. change quickly from one emotional state to another; "fly into a rage" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. transport by aeroplane; "We fly flowers from the Caribbean to North America" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. be dispersed or disseminated; "Rumors and accusations are flying" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. move quickly or suddenly; "He flew about the place" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. travel through the air; be airborne; "Man cannot fly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. (baseball) a hit that flies up in the air Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. decrease rapidly and disappear; "the money vanished in las Vegas"; "all my stock assets have vaporized" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. hit a fly Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. travel in an airplane; "she is flying to Cincinnati tonight"; "Are we driving or flying?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. travel over (an area of land or sea) in an aircraft; "Lindbergh was the first to fly the Atlantic" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. cause to fly or float; "fly a kite" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. run away quickly; "He threw down his gun and fled" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. To move in or pass thorugh the air with wings, as a bird. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To move through the air or before the wind; esp., to pass or be driven rapidly through the air by any impulse. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To float, wave, or rise in the air, as sparks or a flag. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To move or pass swiftly; to hasten away; to circulate rapidly; as, a ship flies on the deep; a top flies around; rumor flies. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To run from danger; to attempt to escape; to flee; as, an enemy or a coward flies. See Note under Flee. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To cause to fly or to float in the air, as a bird, a kite, a flag, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To fly or flee from; to shun; to avoid. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To hunt with a hawk. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Any winged insect; esp., one with transparent wings; as, the Spanish fly; firefly; gall fly; dragon fly. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Any dipterous insect; as, the house fly; flesh fly; black fly. See Diptera, and Illust. in Append. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A familiar spirit; a witch's attendant. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A parasite. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A kind of light carriage for rapid transit, plying for hire and usually drawn by one horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. The part of a vane pointing the direction from which the wind blows. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. That part of a compass on which the points are marked; the compass card. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. Two or more vanes set on a revolving axis, to act as a fanner, or to equalize or impede the motion of machinery by the resistance of the air, as in the striking part of a clock. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A heavy wheel, or cross arms with weights at the ends on a revolving axis, to regulate or equalize the motion of machinery by means of its inertia, where the power communicated, or the resistance to be overcome, is variable, as in the steam engine or the coining press. See Fly wheel (below). Webster Dictionary DB
  39. The piece hinged to the needle, which holds the engaged loop in position while the needle is penetrating another loop; a latch. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. The pair of arms revolving around the bobbin, in a spinning wheel or spinning frame, to twist the yarn. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. A shuttle driven through the shed by a blow or jerk. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. Formerly, the person who took the printed sheets from the press. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. A vibrating frame with fingers, attached to a power to a power printing press for doing the same work. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. The outer canvas of a tent with double top, usually drawn over the ridgepole, but so extended as to touch the roof of the tent at no other place. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. One of the upper screens of a stage in a theater. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. The fore flap of a bootee; also, a lap on trousers, overcoats, etc., to conceal a row of buttons. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. A batted ball that flies to a considerable distance, usually high in the air; also, the flight of a ball so struck; as, it was caught on the fly. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. Knowing; wide awake; fully understanding another's meaning. Webster Dictionary DB
  49. To manage (an aircraft) in flight; as, to fly an aeroplane. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. Waste cotton. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. To move suddenly, or with violence; to do an act suddenly or swiftly; - usually with a qualifying word; as, a door flies open; a bomb flies apart. Webster Dictionary DB
  52. A hook dressed in imitation of a fly, - used for fishing. Webster Dictionary DB
  53. The length of an extended flag from its staff; sometimes, the length from the union to the extreme end. Webster Dictionary DB
  54. An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, Sarcophagidae, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. Medical Dictionary DB
  55. To move through, or rise in, the air with wings; to go quickly through the air as from some driving source; to float in the air, as a flag; move rapidly; run away; part with violence; as, the bottle flew into a thousand pieces. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  56. To avoid; cause to float in the air. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  57. A two-winged insect of many kinds, as the common house fly; a fishhook dressed in imitation of a fly; the outer canvas of a double tent; a lap on a garment to cover a fastening; a hackney carriage. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  58. Flown. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  59. Flying. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  60. A dipterous, or two-winged, insect of the family Muscidae. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  61. To move through the air on wings; to move swiftly; to pass away; to flee; to burst: to flutter. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  62. To avoid, flee from; to cause, to fly, as a kite:-pr.p. flying; pa.t. flew; pa.p. flown. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  63. A small insect with two transparent wings, esp. the common house-fly; a fish-hook dressed with silk, etc., in imitation of a fly; a light double-seated carriage; (mech.) a fly-wheel. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  64. A small two-winged insect. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  65. To flee from; cause to fly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  66. To move through the air; soar; move or pass swiftly; flee; burst. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  67. To cause to take flight. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  68. To flee from; shun. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  69. To move in the air, as by wings. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  70. To move quickly; hasten; dart; flee. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  71. To float in air or water; wave. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  72. To be violently impelled; explode; burst. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  73. One of various small two winged insects. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  74. A light carriage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  75. One of various rapidly moving objects or devices; as, the fly of a printing press. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  76. A flap. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  77. The act of flying. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  78. A dipterous insect, of which there are various species; the common house-fly; a fly-wheel: a flying pinion; that part of a vane which points and shows which way the wind blows; the extent of an ensign, flag, or pendant from the staff to the end that flutters loose in the wind; a light carriage; a hook dressed like a fly; one who or that which takes the sheets from the press or machine. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  79. To avoid; to quit by flight; to cause to float in the air; to flutter, as a flag in the wind. To fly at, to rush or fall on suddenly. To fly in the face, to insult; to assail; to set at defiance. To fly off, to separate or depart suddenly; to revolt. To fly open, to open suddenly or with violence. To fly out, to rush out; to burst into a passion; to break out into licence; to issue with violence. To let fly, to discharge. To let fly the sheets, to let go suddenly and entirely. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  80. To move through the air on wings, like birds; to rise in air; to move swiftly; to pass away; to burst; to flee. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  81. A small well-known insect; anything light or swift; a light carriage let on hire. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  82. To move through the air on wings, as a bird or insect; to pass on or away swiftly; to run or retreat rapidly, as an army; to break or part suddenly; to rush at or attack suddenly; to shun; to avoid. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  83. To move suddenly, or with violence; to do an act suddenly or swiftly; -- usually with a qualifying word; as, a door flies open; a bomb flies apart. mso.anu.edu.au
  84. A hook dressed in imitation of a fly, -- used for fishing. mso.anu.edu.au
  85. Heb. zebub, (Eccl 10:1 ; Isaiah 7:18 ). This fly was so grievous a pest that the Phoenicians invoked against it the aid of their god Baal-zebub (q.v.). The prophet ( Isaiah 7:18 ) alludes to some poisonous fly which was believed to be found on the confines of Egypt, and which would be called by the Lord. Poisonous flies exist in many parts of Africa, for instance, the different kinds of tsetse. Heb. 'arob, the name given to the insects sent as a plague on the land of Egypt ( Exodus 8:21-31 ; Psalms 78:45 ; 105:31 ). The LXX. render this by a word which means the "dog-fly," the cynomuia. The Jewish commentators regarded the Hebrew word here as connected with the word 'arab , which means "mingled;" and they accordingly supposed the plague to consist of a mixed multitude of animals, beasts, reptiles, and insects. But there is no doubt that "the 'arab " denotes a single definite species. Some interpreters regard it as the Blatta orientalis, the cockroach, a species of beetle. These insects "inflict very painful bites with their jaws; gnaw and destroy clothes, household furniture, leather, and articles of every kind, and either consume or render unavailable all eatables." biblestudytools.com
  86. fl[=i], v.i. to move through the air on wings: to move swiftly: to pass away: to flee: to burst quickly or suddenly: to flutter.--v.t. to avoid, flee from: to cause to fly, as a kite:--pr.p. fly'ing; pa.t. flew (fl[=oo]); pa.p. flown (fl[=o]n).--n. a popular name best restricted in its simplicity to the insects forming the order Diptera, but often so widely used with a prefix--e.g. butterfly, dragon-fly, May-fly--as to be virtually equivalent to insect: a fish-hook dressed with silk, &c., in imitation of a fly: a light double-seated carriage, a hackney-coach: (mech.) a flywheel: (pl.) the large space above the proscenium in a theatre, from which the scenes, &c., are controlled.--adj. wide-awake: (slang) knowing.--adjs. FLY'AWAY, flighty; FLY'-BIT'TEN, marked by the bite of flies.--n. FLY'BLOW, the egg of a fly.--adj. FLY'BLOWN, tainted with the eggs which produce maggots.--ns. FLY'BOAT, a long, narrow, swift boat used on canals; FLY'BOOK, a case like a book for holding fishing-flies; FLY'-CATCH'ER, a small bird, so called from its catching flies while on the wing; FLY'-FISH'ER, one who fishes with artificial flies as bait; FLY'-FISH'ING, the art of so fishing; FLY'-FLAP'PER, one who drives away flies with a fly-flap; FLY'ING-BRIDGE, a kind of ferry-boat which is moved across a river by the action of the combined forces of the stream and the resistance of a long rope or chain made fast to a fixed buoy in the middle of the river; FLY'ING-BUTT'RESS, an arch-formed prop which connects the walls of the upper and central portions of an aisled structure with the vertical buttresses of the outer walls; FLY'ING-CAMP, a body of troops for rapid motion from one place to another; FLY'ING-DUTCH'MAN, a Dutch black spectral ship, whose captain is condemned for his impieties to sweep the seas around the Cape of Storms unceasingly, without ever being able to reach a haven; FLY'ING-FISH, a fish which can leap from the water and sustain itself in the air for a short time, by its long pectoral fins, as if flying; FLY'ING-FOX, a large frugivorous bat; FLY'ING-L[=E]'MUR, a galeopithecoid insectivore whose fore and hind limbs are connected by a fold of skin, enabling it to make flying leaps from tree to tree; FLY'ING-PAR'TY, a small body of soldiers, equipped for rapid movements, used to harass an enemy; FLY'ING-PHALAN'GER, a general popular name for the petaurists; FLY'ING-SHOT, a shot fired at something in motion; FLY'ING-SQUID, a squid having broad lateral fins by means of which it can spring high out of the water; FLY'ING-SQUIRR'EL, a name given to two genera of squirrels, which have a fold of skin between the fore and hind legs, by means of which they can take great leaps in the air; FLY'LEAF, a blank leaf at the beginning and end of a book; FLY'-LINE, a line for angling with an artificial fly; FLY'-MAK'ER, one who ties artificial flies for angling; FLY'MAN, one who works the ropes in the flies of a theatre; FLY'P[=A]PER, a porous paper impregnated with poison for destroying flies; FLY'-POW'DER, a poisonous powder used for killing flies; FLY'-RAIL, that part of a table which turns out to support the leaf.--adj. (Shak.) moving slow as a fly on its feet.--ns. FLY'-ROD, a light flexible rod used in fly-fishing, usually in three pieces--butt, second-joint, and tip; FLY'-TRAP, a trap to catch flies: (bot.) the spreading dog-bane, also the Venus's fly-trap; FLY'WHEEL, a large wheel with a heavy rim applied to machinery to equalise the effect of the driving effort.--FLY AT, to attack suddenly; FLY IN THE FACE OF, to insult: to oppose; FLY OPEN, to open suddenly or violently; FLY OUT, to break out in a rage; FLY THE KITE, to obtain money as by accommodation bills, the endorser himself having no money; FLY UPON, to seize: to attack.--A FLY IN THE OINTMENT, some slight flaw which corrupts a thing of value (Eccles. x. i.); BREAK A FLY ON THE WHEEL, to subject to a punishment out of all proportion to the gravity of the offence; LET FLY, to attack: to throw or send off; MAKE THE FEATHERS FLY (see FEATHERS). [A.S. fléogan, pa.t. fleáh; Ger. fliegen.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  87. Two-winged insect (f. in amber, curious relic; f. on wheel, person who overestimates his own influence; break f. on wheel, expend disproportionate energy; hessian, Spanish, tsetse, f.); kinds of plant-disease caused by various ff. (a good deal off. exists); natural or artificial f. used as fishing-bait; f.- bane, kinds of plant, esp. catch -f. & Ploughman\'s spikenard; f.-blow, (n.) f.\'s egg in meat &c, (v.t.) deposit eggs in, taint, (f.-blown, tainted, lit. & fig.); f.-book, case for keeping fishing-ff. in; f. -catcher, trap for ff., kinds of bird; f.-fish (v.i.), fish with f.; f.-flap, for driving away ff.; f.-net, net or fringe protecting horse from ff.; f.-paper, for catching or poisoning ff.; f.-trap, for catching ff., also kinds of plant esp. Venus\'s f.-t., Dionaea; f. -whisk, for driving away ff. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  88. (fiew, flown pr. -on; is, has flown, see -ed; fly is preferred in talk& ordinary prose for flee, but not flew or flown for fled). love through air with wings (f. high, be ambitious; high-flown, exalted, turgid, bombastic; as the crow flies; the bird is flown, person wanted has escaped; often about, away, forth, off, out) or in airship; make (pigeon, hawk) f.; (Hawk.) soar by way of attack at (fig., f, at higher game, have nobler ambitions); pass or rise quickly through air; jump clear over or over fence &c.; make (kite) rise& stay aloft (f. a kite, raise money by accommodation bill, also try how the wind blows, feel one\'s way by ballon d\'essai); (of flag, hair, garment, Sec.) flutter, wave; set or keep (flag) flying; travel swiftly, rush along, pass rapidly; spring, start, hasten, (f. to arms, take up arms eagerly; f. in the FACE of; f. at, upon, attack violently; f. into a passion, raptures, &c.; f. out, burst into violent language or action); be driven or forced off suddenly (made sparks f.; send flying; make the money f., spend quickly; door flew open; glass &c. flies, breaks in pieces); let f., discharge (missile), (abs.) shoot, hit, or use strong language, at; run away, flee, flee from (must f. the country); f.-away (of garments) streaming, loose, neglige. (of persons) flighty; f.-by-night, one who makes night excursions or decamps by night; f.-the-garter, kind of leapfrog. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  89. Flying, distance flown, (on the f., on the wing, in motion); one-horse hackney-carriage; lap on garment to contain or cover buttonholes, flap at entrance of tent; part of flag furthest from staff, also its breadth from staff to end; (Theat.; pi.) space over proscenium; speed-regulating device in clockwork& machinery; f.-leaf, blank leaf at beginning or end of book, blank leaf of circular &c.; flyman, driver of f. =carriage, man stationed in ff. of theatre to work ropes &c; f. -wheel, heavy-rimmed on revolving shaft to regulate machinery or accumulate power. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  90. (slang). Knowing, wide-awake. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  91. a f. in the ointment, trifling circumstance that mars enjoyment. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  92. n. A winged insect of various species, especially, the house fly;—a hook dressed with silk, woollen, &c., in imitation of a fly, used for fishing;—a kind of light carriage;—that part of a flag which extends from the union to the extreme end;—that part of a compass on which the points are marked;—a contrivance to equalize motion or accumulate power in a machine. Cabinet Dictionary
  93. A small winged insect; that part of a machine which, being put into a quick motion, regulates the rest; Fly in a compass, that which points how the wind blows. Complete Dictionary

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