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Definitions of follow

  1. To come after another; to result. To follow on, to continue pursuit or endeavour. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To go or come after; to move behind in the same path or direction; hence, to go with (a leader, guide, etc.); to accompany; to attend. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To accept as authority; to adopt the opinions of; to obey; to yield to; to take as a rule of action; as, to follow good advice. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To copy after; to take as an example. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To succeed in order of time, rank, or office. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To result from, as an effect from a cause, or an inference from a premise. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To walk in, as a road or course; to attend upon closely, as a profession or calling. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To go or come after; pursue; succeed in order; accompany; attend; support the opinions or cause of; imitate or conform to; watch or attend to closely; to practice; as, to follow a profession. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To go after or behind; to pursue; to attend; to imitate; to obey; to adopt, as an opinion; to keep the eye or mind fixed on; to pursue, as an object of desire; to result from; (B.) to strive to obtain. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To go after; pursue; succeed; imitate; obey; result from. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. To go after; result. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. To go or come after; accompany; attend; pursue; engage in; obey. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. To go or come after; - used in the various senses of the transitive verb: To pursue; to attend; to accompany; to be a result; to imitate. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To go or come after another; result. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To come after another; to result. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. perform an accompaniment to; "The orchestra could barely follow the frequent pitch changes of the soprano" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. to be the product or result; "Melons come from a vine"; "Understanding comes from experience" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. come after in time, as a result; "A terrible tsunami followed the earthquake" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. behave in accordance or in agreement with; "Follow a pattern"; "Follow my example" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. to bring something about at a later time than; "She followed dinner with a brandy"; "He followed his lecture with a question and answer period" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. keep informed; "He kept up on his country's foreign policies" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. keep to; "Stick to your principles"; "stick to the diet" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. grasp the meaning; "Can you follow her argument?"; "When he lectures, I cannot follow" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. follow, discover, or ascertain the course of development of something; "We must follow closely the economic development is Cuba" ; "trace the student's progress" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. imitate in behavior; take as a model; "Teenagers follow their friends in everything" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. travel along a certain course; "follow the road"; "follow the trail" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. follow in or as if in pursuit; "The police car pursued the suspected attacker"; "Her bad deed followed her and haunted her dreams all her life" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. follow with the eyes or the mind; "Keep an eye on the baby, please!"; "The world is watching Sarajevo"; "She followed the men with the binoculars" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. keep under surveillance; "The police had been following him for weeks but they could not prove his involvement in the bombing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. to travel behind, go after, come after; "The ducklings followed their mother around the pond"; "Please follow the guide through the museum" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  31. adhere to or practice; "These people still follow the laws of their ancient religion" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  32. accept and follow the leadership or command or guidance of; "Let's follow our great helmsman!"; "She followed a guru for years" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  33. be later in time; "Tuesday always follows Monday" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. come as a logical consequence; follow logically; "It follows that your assertion is false"; "the theorem falls out nicely" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. be next; "Mary plays best, with John and Sue following" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. To watch, as a receding object; to keep the eyes fixed upon while in motion; to keep the mind upon while in progress, as a speech, musical performance, etc.; also, to keep up with; to understand the meaning, connection, or force of, as of a course of thought or argument. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. SUCCEED, ENSUE. Follow and succeed are applied to persons or things; ensue, in modern literature, to things only. Follow denotes the mere going in order in a track or line, but tells nothing of the relative positions, in respect of either place or time, of the individuals; succeed, implying a regular series, denotes the being in the same place which another has held immediately before; as, a crowd may follow, but only one person or event can succeed to another. Ensue is to follow close upon, to follow as the effect of, or on some settled principle of order; as, nothing but suffering can ensue from such a course. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. To be a natural consequence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. To go or come after, or behind; to pursue in order to overtake or obtain; to accompany; to adhere to, and go along with; to result from; to pursue with the eye; to imitate; to pay close attention to; to attend to closely; to obey. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. To go after or behind; to come after; to attend; to pursue; to result from or ensue; to adopt. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. The art or process of following; specif., in some games, as billiards, a stroke causing a ball to follow another ball after hitting it. Also used adjectively; as, follow shot. Webster Dictionary DB

What are the misspellings for follow?

Usage examples for follow

  1. Oh, perhaps they will follow us! – On the Banks of the Amazon by W.H.G. Kingston
  2. Let each follow his own. – The Second Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
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