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Definitions of fool

  1. To trifle; to toy; to spend time in idleness, sport, or mirth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To make a fool of; impose upon; deceive; play the fool. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To infatuate; to make foolish. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To make a butt of; treat with contempt; disappoint; deceive. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To deceive; to treat with contempt. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to spend time in idle sport or mirth. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To play the fool; to trifle. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. To play the fool. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9. indulge in horseplay; "Enough horsing around--let's get back to work!"; "The bored children were fooling about" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. To treat with contempt; to disappoint; to deceive; to infatuate; to cheat. The feast of fools, a kind of festival in the middle ages, somewhat similar to the Saturnalia of the Romans. Abbot of fools, a sort of histrionic character or leading buffoon at the public festivals or mummeries of Christmas or Shrovetide. To play the fool, to act the buffoon; to act like one void of understanding. To put the fool on, to treat as foolish. To make a fool of; to frustrate; to defeat. To fool away, to spend in trifles, idleness, folly, or without advantage; to spend for things of no value or use; to expend improvidently. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To treat with contempt; to disappoint; to cheat; to trifle; to toy. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12. a person who lacks good judgment Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. A person deficient in intellect; one who acts absurdly, or pursues a course contrary to the dictates of wisdom; one without judgment; a simpleton; a dolt. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. One who acts contrary to moral and religious wisdom; a wicked person. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. One who counterfeits folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly kept to make sport, dressed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; - commonly called gooseberry fool. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A person lacking in reason or intelligence; idiot; in old times, a court jester; one who acts in an unwise manner; a victim or butt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. One who acts stupidly; a person of weak mind; a jester; (B.) a wicked person. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. Silly or stupid person; jester. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. A person lacking sense; a simpleton. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. An idiot; imbecile. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. A court jester. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. A person of weak intellect; a person who acts foolishly; a buffoon; a jester. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed with cream. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. One who acts absurdly; a person who is void of reason or understanding; a person of a weak intellect; a jester. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for fool

  1. I am sure before 'tis over I shall make A fool of myself! – The Love-Chase by James Sheridan Knowles
  2. " I don't want a fool – The Duke's Children by Anthony Trollope
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