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Definitions of force

  1. To stuff; to lard; to farce. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To compel; overpower by strength; impel; push; press; strain; cause to grow or ripen by artificial means. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To draw or push by main strength; to compel; to constrain; to compel by strength of evidence; to take by violence; to ravish; (hort.) to cause to grow or ripen rapidly. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. (cookery) To stuff, as a fowl. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To use force upon; compel; take or effect by force. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. To compel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To stimulate artificially. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. To use violence; to make violent effort; to strive; to endeavor. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To make a difficult matter of anything; to labor; to hesitate; hence, to force of, to make much account of; to regard. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To be of force, importance, or weight; to matter. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. cause to move along the ground by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. force into or from an action or state, either physically or metaphorically; "She rammed her mind into focus"; "He drives me mad" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. squeeze like a wedge into a tight space; "I squeezed myself into the corner" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. take by force; "Storm the fort" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. impose or thrust urgently, importunately, or inexorably; "She forced her diet fads on him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. To constrain to door to forbear by the exertion of a power not resistible; to overpower by strength; to draw or push by main strength: to compel by strength of evidence: to take by force; to violate: to overstrain; to distort; to cause to ripen prematurely. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To stuff. See Farce. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. To compel; to obtain by force; to coerce; to draw or push by main strength; to ravish. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. (of a law) having legal validity; "the law is still in effect" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. a powerful effect or influence; "the force of his eloquence easily persuaded them" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. a group of people having the power of effective action; "he joined forces with a band of adventurers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. one possessing or exercising power or influence or authority; "the mysterious presence of an evil power"; "may the force be with you"; "the forces of evil" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. (physics) the physical influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. do forcibly; exert force; "Don't force it!" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. A waterfall; a cascade. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or energy; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; especially, power to persuade, or convince, or impose obligation; pertinency; validity; special signification; as, the force of an appeal, an argument, a contract, or a term. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Strength or power for war; hence, a body of land or naval combatants, with their appurtenances, ready for action; -- an armament; troops; warlike array; -- often in the plural; hence, a body of men prepared for action in other ways; as, the laboring force of a plantation. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Strength or power exercised without law, or contrary to law, upon persons or things; violence. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Validity; efficacy. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Any action between two bodies which changes, or tends to change, their relative condition as to rest or motion; or, more generally, which changes, or tends to change, any physical relation between them, whether mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, magnetic, or of any other kind; as, the force of gravity; cohesive force; centrifugal force. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To constrain to do or to forbear, by the exertion of a power not resistible; to compel by physical, moral, or intellectual means; to coerce; as, masters force slaves to labor. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To compel, as by strength of evidence; as, to force conviction on the mind. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To do violence to; to overpower, or to compel by violence to one;s will; especially, to ravish; to violate; to commit rape upon. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To exert to the utmost; to urge; hence, to strain; to urge to excessive, unnatural, or untimely action; to produce by unnatural effort; as, to force a consient or metaphor; to force a laugh; to force fruits. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit of which he has none. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To provide with forces; to reenforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To allow the force of; to value; to care for. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To impel, drive, wrest, extort, get, etc., by main strength or violence; - with a following adverb, as along, away, from, into, through, out, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. Active power; strength; energy; violence; power to persuade or convince; meaning; troops; armament; a trained or organized body; any cause that produces motion, or a change of motion, in a body. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. Strength, power, energy; efficacy; validity; influence; vehemence; violence; coercion or compulsion; military or naval strength (often in plural); an armament; (mech.) that which produces or tends to produce a change in a body's state of rest or motion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. Strength; power; energy; influence; violence; military strength; body of soldiers. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. Any operating energy; constraint; compulsion; coercion; cogency; efficacy; import. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. An organized body, as of troops; an army. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Power, or a power that produces or tends to produce change; energy; active power; momentum; compulsory power; moral power to convince the mind; validity; power to bind or hold; troops: an army or navy; a body organized for action; necessity; any unlawful violence to person or property. Physical force, the force of physical constraint. External forces, those forces which act upon bodies of matter at sensible distances, as gravitation. Moral force, the power of acting on the reason in judging and determining. Mechanical force, any cause which tends to alter a body's state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line. Correlation of forces, the convertibility of one mode of force into another, as of heat into motion, and vice versa. Conservation of force. See Energy. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. Active power; vigour; quantity of power produced by motion; violence; troops; a body of land or naval combatants; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; power to persuade or convince. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. Forcefully. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. Forceful. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for force?

Usage examples for force

  1. Phil was being raised straight up into the air by some strange force the secret of which he did not understand. – The-Circus-Boys-on-the-Flying-Rings-or-Making-the-Start-in-the-Sawdust-Life by Darlington, Edgar B. P.
  2. My father was trying to force me to marry him and is still trying to do so. – The Eight Strokes of the Clock by Maurice Le Blanc
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