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Definitions of frame

  1. To contrive. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To originate; to plan; to devise; to contrive; to compose; in a bad sense, to invent or fabricate, as something false. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To fit to something else, or for some specific end; to adjust; to regulate; to shape; to conform. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To cause; to bring about; to produce. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To support. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To provide with a frame, as a picture. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To fit (one thing) into another; shape or form; adjust or regulate; invent; adapt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To form: to shape: to construct by fitting the parts to each other: to plan: to constitute: to put a border on: (B.) to contrive. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. To construct; adjust; contrive; put a frame on. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. To put together; contrive; arrange; shape; surround with a frame. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. To shape; to arrange, as the organs of speech. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To proceed; to go. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. draw up the plans or basic details for; "frame a policy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. take or catch as if in a snare or trap; "I was set up!"; "The innocent man was framed by the police" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. enclose in a frame, as of a picture Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. To construct by fitting parts together; to fit one thing to another; to make; to compose, as laws; to conform; to form and digest by thought; to plan; to fabricate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To form or shape; to fit one thing to another; to compose; to draw up. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. To contrive; to effect; to manage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. one of a series of still transparent photographs on a strip of film used in making movies Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. the internal supporting structure that gives an artifact its shape; "the building has a steel skeleton" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. the hard structure (bones and cartilages) that provides a frame for the body of an animal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. Anything composed of parts fitted and united together; a fabric; a structure; esp., the constructional system, whether of timber or metal, that gives to a building, vessel, etc., its model and strength; the skeleton of a structure. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The bodily structure; physical constitution; make or build of a person. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A kind of open case or structure made for admitting, inclosing, or supporting things, as that which incloses or contains a window, door, picture, etc.; that on which anything is held or stretched Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The skeleton structure which supports the boiler and machinery of a locomotive upon its wheels. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A molding box or flask, which being filled with sand serves as a mold for castings. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The ribs and stretchers of an umbrella or other structure with a fabric covering. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A structure of four bars, adjustable in size, on which cloth, etc., is stretched for quilting, embroidery, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A glazed portable structure for protecting young plants from frost. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A term applied, especially in England, to certain machines built upon or within framework; as, a stocking frame; lace frame; spinning frame, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Form; shape; proportion; scheme; structure; constitution; system; as, a frameof government. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Particular state or disposition, as of the mind; humor; temper; mood; as, to be always in a happy frame. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. Contrivance; the act of devising or scheming. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. In games: (a) In pool, the triangular form used in setting up the balls; also, the balls as set up, or the round of playing required to pocket them all; as, to play six frames in a game of 50 points. (b) In bowling, as in tenpins, one of the several innings forming a game. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. Something constructed or made of parts fitted and joined together; that on which anything is held or stretched; as, a quilting frame; any contrivance for inclosing, admitting, or supporting something; as, a window frame; shape; temper; state; as, of the mind. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. The form: a putting together of parts: a case made to inclose or support anything: the skeleton: state of mind. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. Fabric; structure; contrivance to inclose or support; state of mind. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. Something composed of parts united in a system; arrangement; constitution; framework; case. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A mental state or condition. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. Fabric or structure composed of parts fitted and united; any kind of case or structure made for admitting, enclosing, or supporting things; a framework; form; system; shape; contrivance; temper or disposition of mind; a sort of loom an which linen, silk, &c, is stretched for quilting or embroidering; a stand to support the cases in which the types are distributed; a kind of ledge, enclosing a board, which being filled with wet sand, serves as a mould for castings. Frame timbers, those timbers which constitute the frame of a vessel. Lace-frame, a frame or machine for making lace. Stocking-frame, a loom or machine for making stockings. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. A structure formed of united parts; anything made to enclose or surround something else; that on which anything is held or stretched; order; particular state, as of the mind. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for frame?

Usage examples for frame

  1. You are in a bad frame of mind, Marguerite, and you do not understand anything. – Marguerite de Valois by Alexandre Dumas
  2. What do you mean, frame up, Nadine? – Frigid Fracas by Dallas McCord Reynolds
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