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Definitions of full

  1. To become fulled. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To make or become full; show fulness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To scour and thicken, as cloth; to give fulness to. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. (obs.) To bleach or whiten cloth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To press or pound cloth in a mill: to scour and thicken in a mill. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To scour and thicken, as cloth. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. To make (cloth) thicker, as in a fulling - mill. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. To become full or wholly illuminated; as, the moon fulls at midnight. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To become fulled or thickened; as, this material fulls well. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To become full. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. make (a garment) fuller by pleating or gathering Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. increase in phase; "the moon is waxing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. To thicken by shrinking, as cloth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To scour and thicken, as cloth in a mill. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. To scour or cleanse; to make compact, or to thicken in a mill. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. To thicken by moistening, heating, and pressing, as cloth; to mill; to make compact; to scour, cleanse, and thicken in a mill. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The highest state, extent, or measure. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. Complete measure: highest degree: the whole: time of full-moon. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. FULLNESS or FULNESS. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. FULLER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Complete measure. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. The highest state, point, or degree; the state of being full; fulness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Complete measure; the highest state or degree; the whole; the time when the moon presents to the spectator its whole face illuminated. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. State of being satiated, as, fed to the full. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. Abundantly furnished or provided; sufficient in. quantity, quality, or degree; copious; plenteous; ample; adequate; as, a full meal; a full supply; a full voice; a full compensation; a house full of furniture. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Not wanting in any essential quality; complete, entire; perfect; adequate; as, a full narrative; a person of full age; a full stop; a full face; the full moon. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Sated; surfeited. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it, as, to be full of some project. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Filled with emotions. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Impregnated; made pregnant. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Filled up, having within its limits all that it can contain; supplied; not empty or vacant; - said primarily of hollow vessels, and hence of anything else; as, a cup full of water; a house full of people. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. to the greatest degree or extent; completely or entirely; "fully grown"; "he didn't fully understand"; "knew full well"; (`full' is used as a combining form as in `full-grown' or `full-fledged') Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution; with the whole force or effect; thoroughly; completely; exactly; entirely. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. Completely; quite: used in composition to express full extent or degree; as, full-armed, full-fledged, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. Quite: to the same degree: with the whole effect: completely. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. Without abatement; fully; quite. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Quite; to the same degree; with the whole effect; completely; directly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. Without abatement; with the whole effect; completely; exactly, as, full in the face; placed before adj., ad., and other words, to strengthen their significations, as, full many a flower. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  40. constituting the full quantity or extent; complete; "an entire town devastated by an earthquake"; "gave full attention"; "a total failure" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  41. having the normally expected amount; "gives full measure"; "gives good measure"; "a good mile from here" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  42. having ample fabric; "the current taste for wide trousers"; "a full skirt" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  43. not separated into parts or shares; constituting an undivided unit; "an undivided interest in the property"; "a full share" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  44. complete in extent or degree and in every particular; "a full game"; "a total eclipse"; "a total disaster" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  45. containing as much or as many as is possible or normal; "a full glass"; "a sky full of stars"; "a full life"; "the auditorium was full to overflowing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  46. (of sound) having marked depth and body; "full tones"; "a full voice" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  47. beat for the purpose of cleaning and thickening; "full the cloth" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  48. filled to satisfaction with food or drink; "a full stomach" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  49. to the greatest degree or extent; completely or entirely; (`full' in this sense is used as a combining form); "fully grown"; "he didn't fully understand"; "knew full well"; "full-grown"; "full-fledged" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  50. Filled; having no empty space; well supplied; saturated; satiated; copious; plump; expressing much; clear; distinct; sonorous; having the whole disk illuminated; as, a full moon. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  51. Having all it can contain: having no empty space: abundantly supplied or furnished: abounding: containing the whole matter: complete: perfect: strong: clear. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  52. Fully. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. Having all it can contain; occupied; complete. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  54. Quite; entirely. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  55. Containing all that the space will hold; filled; ample; complete. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. Having all it can contain; having no empty space; well supplied or furnished; abounding with; supplied; plump; sated; filled, as regards the imagination or memory; that fills, as a meal; complete; mature; perfect; strong; not faint; clear; exhibiting the whole disc or surface illuminated; copious; ample. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. Well supplied; holding all that can be contained; stored; stuffed; sated; complete; clear; distinct; mature. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for full

  1. Our house will be full to- night. – The Chief Legatee by Anna Katharine Green
  2. The room was very full – Tip Lewis and His Lamp by Pansy
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