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Definitions of full

  1. being at a peak or culminating point; "broad day"; "full summer"; "high noon" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. constituting the full quantity or extent; complete; "an entire town devastated by an earthquake"; "gave full attention"; "a total failure" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. make (a garment) fuller by pleating or gathering Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. to the greatest degree or extent; completely or entirely; "fully grown"; "he didn't fully understand"; "knew full well"; (`full' is used as a combining form as in `full-grown' or `full-fledged') Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. having the normally expected amount; "gives full measure"; "gives good measure"; "a good mile from here" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. having ample fabric; "the current taste for wide trousers"; "a full skirt" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. not separated into parts or shares; constituting an undivided unit; "an undivided interest in the property"; "a full share" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. complete in extent or degree and in every particular; "a full game"; "a total eclipse"; "a total disaster" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. containing as much or as many as is possible or normal; "a full glass"; "a sky full of stars"; "a full life"; "the auditorium was full to overflowing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. (of sound) having marked depth and body; "full tones"; "a full voice" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. (informal) having consumed enough food or drink; "a full stomach" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. increase in phase; "the moon is waxing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. beat for the purpose of cleaning and thickening; "full the cloth" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. filled to satisfaction with food or drink; "a full stomach" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. to the greatest degree or extent; completely or entirely; (`full' in this sense is used as a combining form); "fully grown"; "he didn't fully understand"; "knew full well"; "full-grown"; "full-fledged" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. Abundantly furnished or provided; sufficient in. quantity, quality, or degree; copious; plenteous; ample; adequate; as, a full meal; a full supply; a full voice; a full compensation; a house full of furniture. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Not wanting in any essential quality; complete, entire; perfect; adequate; as, a full narrative; a person of full age; a full stop; a full face; the full moon. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Sated; surfeited. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it, as, to be full of some project. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Filled with emotions. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Impregnated; made pregnant. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Complete measure; utmost extent; the highest state or degree. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution; with the whole force or effect; thoroughly; completely; exactly; entirely. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To become full or wholly illuminated; as, the moon fulls at midnight. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To thicken by moistening, heating, and pressing, as cloth; to mill; to make compact; to scour, cleanse, and thicken in a mill. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To become fulled or thickened; as, this material fulls well. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To pucker. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. Filled up, having within its limits all that it can contain; supplied; not empty or vacant; - said primarily of hollow vessels, and hence of anything else; as, a cup full of water; a house full of people. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Filled; having no empty space; well supplied; saturated; satiated; copious; plump; expressing much; clear; distinct; sonorous; having the whole disk illuminated; as, a full moon. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. The highest state, extent, or measure. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. To scour and thicken, as cloth; to give fulness to. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. Completely; quite: used in composition to express full extent or degree; as, full-armed, full-fledged, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. Having all it can contain: having no empty space: abundantly supplied or furnished: abounding: containing the whole matter: complete: perfect: strong: clear. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. Complete measure: highest degree: the whole: time of full-moon. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. FULLNESS or FULNESS. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. Quite: to the same degree: with the whole effect: completely. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. (obs.) To bleach or whiten cloth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. To press or pound cloth in a mill: to scour and thicken in a mill. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. FULLER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. To become full. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. Complete measure. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  43. Fully. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Having all it can contain; occupied; complete. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. Quite; entirely. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. To scour and thicken, as cloth. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  47. To make or become full; show fulness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. To make (cloth) thicker, as in a fulling - mill. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. To thicken by shrinking, as cloth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. Containing all that the space will hold; filled; ample; complete. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. The highest state, point, or degree; the state of being full; fulness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. Without abatement; fully; quite. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. Having all it can contain; having no empty space; well supplied or furnished; abounding with; supplied; plump; sated; filled, as regards the imagination or memory; that fills, as a meal; complete; mature; perfect; strong; not faint; clear; exhibiting the whole disc or surface illuminated; copious; ample. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. Quite; to the same degree; with the whole effect; completely; directly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. Complete measure; the highest state or degree; the whole; the time when the moon presents to the spectator its whole face illuminated. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. To scour and thicken, as cloth in a mill. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. To become fulled. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  58. Well supplied; holding all that can be contained; stored; stuffed; sated; complete; clear; distinct; mature. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  59. State of being satiated, as, fed to the full. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  60. Without abatement; with the whole effect; completely; exactly, as, full in the face; placed before adj., ad., and other words, to strengthen their significations, as, full many a flower. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  61. To scour or cleanse; to make compact, or to thicken in a mill. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  62. Ample; complete; perfect; mature ; not wanting in any essential quality.Mobile School Com'rs v. Putnam, 44 Ala. 537; Reed v. Hazleton, 37 Kan. 321, 15 Pac.177; Quinn v. Donovan, 85 111. 195. thelawdictionary.org
  63. Filled up, having within its limits all that it can contain; supplied; not empty or vacant; -- said primarily of hollow vessels, and hence of anything else; as, a cup full of water; a house full of people. mso.anu.edu.au
  64. fool, adj. having all it can contain: having no empty space: abundantly supplied or furnished: abounding: containing the whole matter: complete: perfect: strong: clear: (coll.) drunk: at poker, consisting of three of a kind and a pair.--n. completest extent, as of the moon: highest degree: the whole: time of full-moon.--v.t. to draw up or pucker the cloth on one side more than on the other.--adv. quite: to the same degree: with the whole effect: completely.--adjs. FULL'-[=A]'CORNED (Shak.), full-fed with acorns; FULL'-AGED, having reached one's majority.--n. FULL'-BLOOD, an individual of pure blood.--adjs. FULL'-BLOOD'ED; FULL'-BLOOMED, in perfect bloom; FULL'-BLOWN, blown or fully expanded, as a flower; FULL'-BOTT'OMED, having a full or large bottom, as a wig.--n. FULL'-DRESS, the dress worn on occasions of state or ceremony.--adjs. FULL'-EYED, with large prominent eyes; FULL'-FACED, having a full or broad face; FULL'-FED, fed to plumpness; FULL'-FRAUGHT (Shak.), full-stored; FULL'-GROWN, grown to maturity; FULL'-HAND'ED, bearing something valuable, as a gift; FULL'-HEART'ED, full of heart or courage: elated; FULL'-HOT (Shak.), heated to the utmost; FULL'-LENGTH, extending the whole length (n. a portrait showing such); FULL-MANNED (Shak.), having a full crew.--ns. FULL'-MOON, the moon with its whole disc illuminated, when opposite the sun; FULL'NESS, FUL'NESS, the state of being filled so as to have no part vacant: the state of abounding in anything: completeness: satiety: largeness: force and volume, as of sound: (Shak.) plenty, wealth.--adjs. FULL'-ORBED, having the orb or disc fully illuminated, as the full-moon: round; FULL'-SAILED, unbounded, absolute: moving onwards under full sail; FULL-SPLIT (slang), with all one's might or speed; FULL'-SUMMED, complete in all its parts.--n. FULL'-SWING, the full extent or utmost limit.--adj. FULL'-WINGED (Shak.), having perfect or strong wings.--adv. FULL'Y, completely: entirely.--FULL BACK (football), see BACK.--AT THE FULL, at the height, as of one's good fortune, &c.; IN FULL, without reduction; IN THE FULLNESS OF TIME, at the proper or destined time.--TO THE FULL, in full measure, completely. [A.S. full; Goth. fulls, Ice. fullr, Ger. voll.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  65. fool, v.t. to press or pound cloth in a mill: to scour and thicken in a mill.--ns. FULL'AGE, the charge for fulling cloth; FULL'ER, a bleacher or cleanser of cloth; FULLER'S-EARTH, a soft earth or clay, capable of absorbing grease, used in fulling or bleaching cloth; FULLER'S-THISTLE, -WEED, the teasel; FULL'ERY, the place or works where fulling of cloth is carried on; FULL'ING-MILL, a mill in which woollen cloth is fulled. [O. Fr. fuler--Low L. full[=a]re--L. fullo, a cloth-fuller.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  66. Filled to utmost capacity, holding all (of, or abs.) its limits will allow, replete, (f. to the brim, to overflowing, & colloq. up), (of heart &c.) overcharged with emotion (f.-hearted, stirred with deep feeling, also zealous, confident, courageous); holding or having abundance of, crowded (in a f. house, with a good proportion of members present), showing marked signs of (f. of vitality); engrossed with the thought of (f. of himself, of his subject; f. of the news &c., unable to keep from talking of it); replete with food (archaic of persons; a f. stomach); (chiefly bibl.) having had one\'s fill of (f. of years& honours); abundant, sufficient, copious, satisfactory, (a f. meal; turned it to f. account; give f. details; he is very f. on this point); complete, entire, perfect, answering completely to its name, reaching the specified or usual limit, entirely visible, (f. point or stop, period in punctuation; f. daylight, membership; f. brother, sister, born of same father and mother; of the f. blood, of pure descent, not hybrid, so f.-blooded, & see below; f. pay, that allowed on active service; f. age, after minority; f. Dress, & so f.-dress rehearsal; f.-dress debate in Parliament, prearranged on important question, not arising casually; f. SWING n.; at f. length, lying stretched out, also=in f. below; f.-length portrait &c., of whole figure; f. moon, with whole disk illuminated, also the time when this comes; f. face, turned straight to spectator; waited a f. hour; it was f. summer); (of light) intense, (of colour) deep, (of motion &c.) vigorous (a f. pulse; f. gallop, speed, &c., used adv. with come &c.); swelling, plump, protuberant, (of dress) containing superfluous material arranged in folds &c. (vb, make f., gather, pleat); f. -back, football player stationed behind; f.-blooded, vigorous, hearty, sensual, & see above; f.-bodied, esp. of wine with much BODY; f.-bottomed of wig, long behind, opp. BOB; f.-mouthed, (of cattle) with f. complement of teeth, (of dogs) baying loudly. (of oratory, style, &c.) sonorous, vigorous; f.-timer, child who attends during all school-hours (opp. half-timer); (used abs. as n.) whole (cannot tell you the f. of it; in f., without abridgment; to the f., to the utmost extent, quite); height, acme, (season, moon, is past the f.); hence fullish (2) a. (Adv.) very (chiefly poet.; f. fain; f. many a; know it f. well); quite, fully, (f. six miles; f. as useful as; often in comb., as f.-blown, of flowers, quite open, also fig. as f.-b. dignity; f.-grown, having reached maturity); exactly (hit him f. on the nose). [German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  67. Cleanse& thicken (cloth). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. n. Complete, measure; utmost extent; highest state or degree;—whole; total; state of being satiated or satisfied;—time when the moon presents its whole orbit to the earth. Cabinet Dictionary
  69. adv. Quite; completely; exactly; entirely; directly. Cabinet Dictionary
  70. Replete, without any space void; abounding in any quality good or bad; stored with anything; well supplied with anything; plump, fat; saturated, sated; crouded in the imagination or memory; complete, such as that nothing further is wanted; containing the whole matter, expressing much; mature, perfect; applied to the moon, complete in its orb. Complete Dictionary
  71. Complete measure; the highest state or degree; the whole, the total ; the state of being full; applied to the moon, the time in which the moon makes a perfect orb. Complete Dictionary
  72. Without abatement; with the whole effect; quite; exactly; very sufficiently; directly. Complete Dictionary

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