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Definitions of game

  1. place a bet on; "Which horse are you backing?"; "I'm betting on the new horse" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. (informal) your occupation or line of work; "he's in the plumbing game"; "she's in show biz" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. disabled in the feet or legs; "a crippled soldier"; "a game leg" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a contest with rules to determine a winner; "you need four people to play this game" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a single play of a game; "the game lasted 2 hours" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. an amusement or pastime; "they played word games"; "he thought of his painting as a game that filled his empty time"; "his life was all fun and games" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. animal hunted for food or sport Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the game equipment needed to play a game; "the child received several games for his birthday" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the flesh of wild animals that is used for food Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the score at a particular point or the score needed to win; "the game is 6 all"; "he is serving for the game" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. willing to face danger Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. frivolous or trifling behavior; "for actors, memorizing lines is no game"; "for him, life is all fun and games" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. your occupation or line of work; "he's in the plumbing game"; "she's in show biz" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. a secret scheme to do something (especially something underhand or illegal); "they concocted a plot to discredit the governor"; "I saw through his little game from the start" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. (games) the score at a particular point or the score needed to win; "the game is 6 all"; "he is serving for the game" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. Crooked; lame; as, a game leg. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Sport of any kind; jest, frolic. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A contest, physical or mental, according to certain rules, for amusement, recreation, or for winning a stake; as, a game of chance; games of skill; field games, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The use or practice of such a game; a single match at play; a single contest; as, a game at cards. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. That which is gained, as the stake in a game; also, the number of points necessary to be scored in order to win a game; as, in short whist five points are game. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. In some games, a point credited on the score to the player whose cards counts up the highest. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A scheme or art employed in the pursuit of an object or purpose; method of procedure; projected line of operations; plan; project. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Animals pursued and taken by sportsmen; wild meats designed for, or served at, table. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Having a resolute, unyielding spirit, like the gamecock; ready to fight to the last; plucky. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To play at any sport or diversion. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To play for a stake or prize; to use cards, dice, billiards, or other instruments, according to certain rules, with a view to win money or other thing waged upon the issue of the contest; to gamble. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To rejoice; to be pleased; - often used, in Old English, impersonally with dative. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A sport or amusement; fun; frolic; a single match at play; wild animals pursued and killed by shooting or hunting; any object of pursuit. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. Play for a stake or prize. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Pertaining to animals or birds hunted or taken for sport; ready; plucky. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. Sport of any kind: an exercise for amusement: the stake in a game: wild animals protected by law and hunted by sportsmen. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To play at any game: to play for money, to gamble. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. Sport; play; animals hunted. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To play; gamble. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To play a game for a stake. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Of or pertaining to game. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. Ready to fight; unflinching. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A contest for recreation or amusement; a jest; joke; sport. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A scheme; plot. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. Wild animals collectively, or their flesh; any object of pursuit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Pertaining to game; plucky; keeping up one's pluck. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. Public diversions or contests exhibited as spectacles. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. Sport of any kind; diversion; an exercise or play for amusement, winning a stake, &c; a single match at play; advantage in play; conquest in play; field sports, as the chase, falconry, &c.; animals pursued or taken in the chase or in the sports of the field; sport. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To play at any sport or diversion; to play for a stake or prize; to practise gambling. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. Wild animals pursued or taken by hunting; sport or diversion of any kind; contest for amusement; a single match at play; sportive insult or mockery. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. To play at any sport; to gamble. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. Of or pertaining to such animals as are hunted for game, or to the act or practice of hunting. mso.anu.edu.au
  48. To rejoice; to be pleased; -- often used, in Old English, impersonally with dative. mso.anu.edu.au
  49. 1. Birds and beasts of a wild nature, obtained by fowling and hunting. Bacon,Abr. See Coolidge v. Choate, 11 Mete. (Mass.) 79. The term is said to include (inEngland) hares, pheasants, partridges, grouse, heath or moor game, black game, andbustards. Brown. See 1 & 2 Wm. IV. c. 32. thelawdictionary.org
  50. Birds and beasts of a wild-nature, obtained by fowling and hunting. Bac. Ab. h. t.; Animals; Ferae natural. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  51. g[=a]m, n. sport of any kind: an exercise or contest for recreation or amusement, esp. athletic contests: the stake in a game: the manner of playing a game: the requisite number of points to be gained to win a game: jest, sport, trick, artifice: any object of pursuit or desire: (Shak.) gallantry: the spoil of the chase: wild animals protected by law and hunted by sportsmen, the flesh of such--hares, pheasants, partridges, grouse, blackcock.--adj. of or belonging to such animals as are hunted as game: plucky, courageous: (slang) having the spirit to do something.--v.i. to gamble.--ns. GAME'-BAG, a bag for holding a sportsman's game, also the whole amount of game taken at one time; GAME'COCK, a cock trained to fight; GAME'KEEPER, one who has the care of game.--n.pl. GAME'-LAWS, laws relating to the protection of certain animals called game.--adv. GAMELY.--ns. GAME'NESS; GAME'-PRESERV'ER, one who preserves game on his property for his own sport or profit.--adj. GAME'SOME, playful.--ns. GAME'SOMENESS, sportiveness: merriment; GAME'STER, one viciously addicted to gambling: a gambler; GAME'-TEN'ANT, one who rents the privilege of shooting or fishing over a particular estate or district; GAM'ING, gambling; GAM'ING-HOUSE, a gambling-house, a hell; GAM'ING-T[=A]'BLE, a table used for gambling.--adj. GAM'Y, having the flavour of dead game kept till tainted: (coll.) spirited, plucky.--BIG GAME, the larger animals hunted; DIE GAME, to keep up courage to the last; MAKE A GAME OF, to play with real energy or skill; MAKE GAME OF, to make sport of, to ridicule; RED GAME, the Scotch ptarmigan; ROUND GAME, a game, as at cards, in which the number of players is not fixed; THE GAME IS NOT WORTH THE CANDLE (see CANDLE); THE GAME IS UP, the game is started: the scheme has failed. [A.S. gamen, play; Ice. gaman, Dan. gammen.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  52. g[=a]m, adj. (slang) crooked, lame. [Most prob. not the Celt. cam, crooked.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  53. Jest (make g. of, ridicule); diversion; amusing incident (what a g.!); contest played according to rules& decided by skill, strength, or luck (ROUND, SQUARE, g.; have the g. in your hands, be sure to win or able to direct it; play the g. lit. & fig., observe the rules, behave honourably; play a good, poor, g., be skilful or not); (Greek& Rom. Ant.; pl.) athletic, dramatic, & musical contests, gladiatorial &c. shows; scheme, undertaking, &c., followed up like a g. (was playing a deep, double, winning, losing, &c., g.; the g. is up, success now impossible; so that\'s your little g.; spoilt my g.; play one\'s g., advance his schemes unintentionally; g. not worth CANDLE); (pl.) dodges, tricks, (none of your gg.!); single round in some contests, e.g. whist or tennis (g. & g., one g. scored to each side); (Commerc.) apparatus for a g.; winning score in g.; state of g. (the g. is four all, love three, &c.); hunted animal, quarry, object of pursuit, (fair g., legitimately to be pursued or attacked; so forbidden g.); (collect.) wild animals, birds, &c., hunted for sport or food, flesh of these; kept flock of swans; g.-act, -law (usu. pl.), regulating the killing& preservation of g.; g.-bag, for holding g. killed by sportsman; g.-ball, state of g. in tennis &c. at which one point may win; g.-chicken, -cock, -egg, -fowl, of kind bred for cockfighting; gamekeeper, man employed to breed g., prevent poaching, &c.; g.-licence, to kill or deal in g.; g.-preserver, landowner &c. who breeds g. & applies g.-laws strictly; g.-tenant, lessee of shooting or fishing. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. Like a game-cock, spirited, (DIE g.); having the spirit to do, for. Hence gamely adv., gameness n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. Play at gg. of chance for money, gamble; throw away in gambling; gaming-house, -table, frequented for gambling. Hence gamester n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. (Of leg, arm, &c.) lame, crippled. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  57. [A.S.] In England (1 and 2 William IV., c. 32), includes " hares, pheasants, partridges, grouse, heath or moor game, black-game, and bustards;" and (25 and 26 Vict., c. 114) also "the eggs of game, woodcocks, snipes, rabbits." In Scotland, G. is not so clearly defined ; but the difference is trifling, mainly of importance in dealing with each separate Act. In Ireland, G. includes " deer, hares, pheasants, partridges, grouse, landrails, quails, moor-game, heath-game, wild turkeys, or bustards."- Stonehenge's Brit. Rural Sports. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  58. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Icelandic, German] Sport of any kind; jest; frolic;—mockery; derision;—hence, object of ridicule; butt;—an exercise or play for amusement or for stakes; trial of strength, skill, or hazard;—a single match at play;—advantage in playing;—a scheme pursued; measure planned;—field sport; chase; falconry, &c.;—animals pursued or shot at, as deer, limes, grouse, &c.;—pl. Public contests or diversions for the gratification of the people. Cabinet Dictionary
  59. Sport of any kind; jest, opposed to earnest; insolent merriment, sportive insult; a single match at play; field sports, as the chafe; animals pursued in the field; solemn contests exhibited as spectacles to the people. Complete Dictionary

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