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Definitions of gap

  1. To notch, as a sword or knife. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To make an opening in; to breach. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To notch or jag: to cut into teeth like those of a saw. "A cut with a gap'd knife."-Sterne: to make a break or opening, as in a fence, wall, or the like. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To notch; make a breach in. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  5. To make a gap in. To stop a gap, to secure a weak point; to repair a defect. To stand in the gap, to expose one's self for the protection of something. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  6. a pass between mountain peaks Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a narrow opening; "he opened the window a crack" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a conspicuous disparity or difference as between two figures; "gap between income and outgo"; "the spread between lending and borrowing costs" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. An opening in anything made by breaking or parting; as, a gap in a fence; an opening for a passage or entrance; an opening which implies a breach or defect; a vacant space or time; a hiatus; a mountain pass. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The vertical distance between two superposed surfaces, esp. in a biplane. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. An opening made by rapture or parting: a cleft: a passage. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. An opening; cleft; vacancy. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. A passage or aperture; breach; ravine. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. An opening in anything made by breaking or parting; a cleft; a passage; a defect; a hiatus. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. An opening; a hiatus; a breach; a hole; any opening: to stop a gap, to patch up or make a shift for a time: to stand in the gap, to stand forward in the post of danger, as a defender. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for gap

  1. I help up my foot, and saw blood inside the gap – Hunger by Knut Hamsun
  2. There was a gap for a full minute. – In the Bishop's Carriage by Miriam Michelson
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