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Definitions of gather

  1. To collect; to increase; to generate pus or matter; to ripen. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To bring together; to collect, as a number of separate things, into one place, or into one aggregate body; to assemble; to muster; to congregate. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To pick out and bring together from among what is of less value; to collect, as a harvest; to harvest; to cull; to pick off; to pluck. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To accumulate by collecting and saving little by little; to amass; to gain; to heap up. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To bring closely together the parts or particles of; to contract; to compress; to bring together in folds or plaits, as a garment; also, to draw together, as a piece of cloth by a thread; to pucker; to plait; as, to gather a ruffle. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To derive, or deduce, as an inference; to collect, as a conclusion, from circumstances that suggest, or arguments that prove; to infer; to conclude. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To gain; to win. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To bring together, or nearer together, in masonry, as where the width of a fireplace is rapidly diminished to the width of the flue, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To haul in; to take up; as, to gather the slack of a rope. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To assemble or bring together; collect; bring into one place; pick up; glean; pluck; accumulate; pucker or plait; infer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To collect: to acquire: to plait: to learn by inference. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. To collect; infer; plait. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. To deduce; infer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To draw into folds. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. To come together; to collect; to unite; to become assembled; to congregate. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To grow larger by accretion; to increase. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To concentrate; to come to a head, as a sore, and generate pus; as, a boil has gathered. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To collect or bring things together. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To congregate; generate pus; increase; ripen. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To assemble or muster: to increase: to suppurate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To assemble; increase; suppurate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. get people together; "assemble your colleagues"; "get together all those who are interested in the project"; "gather the close family members" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. collect in one place; "We assembled in the church basement"; "Let's gather in the dining room" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. conclude from evidence; "I gather you have not done your homework" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. look for (food) in nature; "Our ancestors gathered nuts in the Fall" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. draw fabric together and sew it tightly Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. To congregate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To increase; accumulate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. To come to a head; concentrate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. To bring together; to collect; to pluck; to acquire; to accumulate; to contract; to pucker; to plait; to deduce by inference. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To bring together; to collect; to accumulate; to assemble; to infer; to pick, as fruit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. sewing consisting of small folds or puckers made by pulling tight a thread in a line of stitching Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing a thread through it; a pucker. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. The inclination forward of the axle journals to keep the wheels from working outward. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. The soffit or under surface of the masonry required in gathering. See Gather, v. t., 7. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing the thread through. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. A plait; fold. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. A plait or fold in cloth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing. To gather breath, to have respite. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. A fold in sewing; a pucker. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for gather?

Usage examples for gather

  1. " From Lansing's remarks I gather that he is convinced that our enemies will agree to a conference and that then the American Government will have an opportunity to speak in favor of peace. – My Three Years in America by Johann Heinrich Andreas Hermann Albrecht Graf von Bernstorff
  2. Again his face twisted, but he seemed to gather hold of himself. – Counsel for the Defense by Leroy Scott
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