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Definitions of gin

  1. To catch in a trap. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. To clear of seeds by a machine; as, to gin cotton. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To catch in a trap; to clear (cotton) of seeds by a machine. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To clear cotton of its seeds by means of the cotton-gin: to catch in a trap. "So, so, the woodcock's ginn'd."-Beau. & Fl. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To clear of seeds by a machine, as cotton. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. To remove the seeds from (cotton). The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To begin; - often followed by an infinitive without to; as, gan tell. See Gan. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. trap with a gin; "gin game" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. To clear cotton of its seed by a machine; to catch in a trap. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. To catch in a trap; to separate the seeds from the cotton by a machine. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. Ginning. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. a machine that separates the seeds from raw cotton fibers Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a form of rummy in which a player can go out if the cards remaining in their hand total less than 10 points Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a trap for birds or small mammals; often has a noose Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. trap with a snare; "gin game" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. Against; near by; towards; as, gin night. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Contrivance; artifice; a trap; a snare. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A machine for raising or moving heavy weights, consisting of a tripod formed of poles united at the top, with a windlass, pulleys, ropes, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A hoisting drum, usually vertical; a whim. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A machine for separating the seeds from cotton; a cotton gin. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A strong alcoholic liquor, distilled from rye and barley, and flavored with juniper berries; - also called Hollands and Holland gin, because originally, and still very extensively, manufactured in Holland. Common gin is usually flavored with turpentine. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A fragrant alcoholic liquor flavored with juniper berries; a trap or snare; a machine for clearing cotton fibers from the seeds; a portable hoisting machine; a pile-driving machine. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Same as GENEVA, of which it is a contraction. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. A trap; a snare: a machine or instrument by which the mechanical powers are employed in aid of human strength; especially, (a) a machine used instead of a crane, consisting essentially of three poles from 12 to 15 feet in length, often tapering from the lower extremity to the top, and united together at their upper extremities, whence a block and tackle is suspended, the lower extremities being planted in the ground about 8 or 9 feet asunder, and there being a kind of windlass attached to two of the legs; (b) a kind of whim or windlass worked by a horse which turns a cylinder and winds on it a rope, thus raising minerals or the like from a depth; (c) a machine for separating the seeds from cotton, called hence a cotton-gin, which was invented by Eli Whitney of Massachusetts, in 1794. The name is also given to a machine for driving piles, to an engine of torture, and to a pump moved by rotary sails. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. An engine; machine; trap. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. Spirit made from rye or barley, and flavored with juniper berries. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. One of various machines. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A snare or trap. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. An aromatic distilled liquor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. See Geneva. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. A machine of various kinds for driving piles, raising great weights, disentangling cotton fibers, &c.; a snare or trap. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. A well-known distilled spirit flavoured with juniper-berries; also called Geneva or Hollands. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. Contrivance; share; trap; a machine for driving piles, or for raising and moving heavy weights; a kind of machinery for raising coals or ore from mines. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. If. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. If; suppose (Scotch); by or against a certain time; as, I'll be there gin five o'clock. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. Ginned. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for gin?

Usage examples for gin

  1. Did they offer to gin ye a job? – Watch Yourself Go By by Al. G. Field
  2. Oy sawed the firing gin coming, and oy said to stoarp, and the firing gin didn't stoarpt, and it said whoy- whoy- whoy! – When Ghost Meets Ghost by William Frend De Morgan
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