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Definitions of gorge

  1. a narrow pass (especially one between mountains) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the passage between the pharynx and the stomach Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a deep ravine (usually with a river running through it) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. overeat or eat immodestly; make a pig of oneself; "She stuffed herself at the dinner"; "The kids binged on icecream" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. The throat. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To eat greedily. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  7. The throat; the gullet; the canal by which food passes to the stomach. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A narrow passage or entrance Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A defile between mountains. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. That which is gorged or swallowed, especially by a hawk or other fowl. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A filling or choking of a passage or channel by an obstruction; as, an ice gorge in a river. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A concave molding; a cavetto. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The groove of a pulley. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To swallow; especially, to swallow with greediness, or in large mouthfuls or quantities. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To glut; to fill up to the throat; to satiate. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To eat greedily and to satiety. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A primitive device used instead of a fishhook, consisting of an object easy to be swallowed but difficult to be ejected or loosened, as a piece of bone or stone pointed at each end and attached in the middle to a line. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The entrance into a bastion or other outwork of a fort; - usually synonymous with rear. See Illust. of Bastion. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The throat; gullet; that which is swallowed; a filling or choking of a channel by an obstruction; as, an ice gorge in a river; a narrow passage between mountains or hills. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To swallow greedily or in large mouthfuls; satiate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Throat, guttur, gullet. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  22. A ravine. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. The throat: a narrow pass among hills: (fort.) the entrance to an outwork. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To swallow greedily: to glut. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. To feed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. The throat; narrow ravine. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. To devour greedily; glut. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. To eat greedily; glut. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. The throat; the gullet; a narrow pass between hills or mountains, or its entrance; a concave moulding or cavetto; the entrance into a bastion or other outwork; that which is gorged or swallowed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To swallow with greediness; to glut. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To feed greedily. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. The throat; the gullet; the entrance into the outwork of a fort; that which is swallowed; a narrow passage between hills or mountains. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. To swallow greedily; to feed to satiety; to glut. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. The entrance into a bastion or other outwork of a fort; -- usually synonymous with rear. See Illust. of Bastion. mso.anu.edu.au
  35. gorj, n. the throat: a narrow pass among hills: (fort.) the entrance to an outwork.--v.t. to swallow greedily: to glut.--v.i. to feed.--adj. GORGED, having a gorge or throat: glutted: (her.) having a crown or coronet about the neck.--n. GORG'ET, a piece of armour for the throat: a military ornament round the neck (see ARMOUR).--HAVE ONE'S GORGE RISE, to be disgusted or irritated; HEAVE THE GORGE, to retch. [O. Fr.,--L. gurges, a whirlpool.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. Ingluvies, Pharynx, Throat-g. Grosse, Bronchocele-g. Mal de, Cynanche. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  37. (Rhet.) internal throat; what has been swallowed, contents of stomach, (cast the g. at, reject with loathing; one\'s g. rises at, one is sickened or disgusted by); (Fortif.) neck of bastion or other outwork, rear entrance to a work; narrow opening, usu. with stream, between hills: solid object meant to be swallowed as bait for fish. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. Feed greedily; satiate, glut; swallow, devour greedily; fill full, distend, choke up; (n.) act of gorging, surfeit. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. [Fr.] (Mil.) The contracted space between the interior extremities of the faces or flanks of a fortification. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  40. [Fr.] A narrow passage between two hills. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  41. n. [Latin] The throat; the gullet;—a narrow passage or defile between mountains;—the entrance into a bastion or other outwork of a fort;—that which is swallowed, especially by a hawk. Cabinet Dictionary
  42. The throat, the swallow ; that which is gorged or swallowed. Complete Dictionary

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