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Definitions of grass

  1. give away information about somebody; "He told on his classmate who had cheated on the exam" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a soft drug consisting of the dried leaves of the hemp plant; smoked or chewed for euphoric effect Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a strong-smelling plant from whose dried leaves a number of euphoriant and hallucinogenic drugs are prepared Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. animal food for browsing or grazing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. German writer of novels and poetry and plays (born 1927) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. shoot down, of birds Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. feed with grass Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. cover with grass Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. street names for marijuana Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. narrow-leaved green herbage: grown as lawns; used as pasture for grazing animals; cut and dried as hay Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. spread out clothes on the grass to let it dry and bleach Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. cover with grass; "The owners decided to grass their property" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. Popularly: Herbage; the plants which constitute the food of cattle and other beasts; pasture. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. An endogenous plant having simple leaves, a stem generally jointed and tubular, the husks or glumes in pairs, and the seed single. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The season of fresh grass; spring. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Metaphorically used for what is transitory. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To cover with grass or with turf. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To expose, as flax, on the grass for bleaching, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To bring to the grass or ground; to land; as, to grass a fish. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To produce grass. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (CEREALS) come from members of this family. Medical Dictionary DB
  22. Herbage having hollow, jointed stalks, narrow leaves called blades, and seeds similar to those of grain. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Common herbage: an order of plants with long, narrow leaves, and tubular stem, including wheat, rye, oats, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To cover with grass. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. Grassy. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. Herbage; order of plants with narrow leaves and tubular stems. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. The green plants on which cattle feed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Any plant with hollow, jointed stems and sheathing leaves. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. The herbage which forms the food of cattle and other beasts; an order of plants, with simple leaves, a stem generally jointed and tubular, a husky calyx, and the seed single. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To cover with grass or turf; to bleach. Grass of Parnassus, a herb growing in wet ground. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. Field or hill pasture; the plants having simple leaves, jointed and tubular stems, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. To cover with turf or herbage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. Heb. hatsir, ripe grass fit for mowing ( 1 Kings 18:5 ; Job 40:15 ; Psalms 104:14 ). As the herbage rapidly fades under the scorching sun, it is used as an image of the brevity of human life ( Isaiah 40:6 Isaiah 40:7 ; Psalms 90:5 ). In Numbers 11:5 this word is rendered "leeks." biblestudytools.com
  34. Heb. deshe', green grass ( Genesis 1:11 Genesis 1:12 ; Isaiah 66:14 ; Deuteronomy 32:2 ). "The sickly and forced blades of grass which spring up on the flat plastered roofs of houses in the East are used as an emblem of speedy destruction, because they are small and weak, and because, under the scorching rays of the sun, they soon wither away" ( 2 Kings 19:26 ; Psalms 129:6 ; Isaiah 37:27 ). The dry stalks of grass were often used as fuel for the oven ( Matthew 6:30 ; 13:30 ; Luke 12:28 ). These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible[T] indicates this entry was also found in Torrey's Topical TextbookBibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for Grass". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  35. gras, n. common herbage: an order of plants (Gramineæ), the most important in the whole vegetable kingdom, with long, narrow leaves and tubular stem, including wheat, rye, oats, rice, millet, and all those which supply food for nearly all graminivorous animals: short for asparagus--sparrow-grass: time of grass, spring or summer: the surface of a mine.--v.t. to cover with grass: to feed with grass: to bring to the grass or ground, as a bird or a fish-- (various perennial fodder grasses are timothy, fox-tail, cock's-foot, and the fescue grasses, Italian rye-grass, &c.).--ns. GRASS'-CLOTH, a name applied to different kinds of coarse cloth, the fibre of which is rarely that of a grass, esp. to the Chinese summer-cloth made from Boehmeria nivea, which is really a nettle; GRASS'-CUT'TER, one of the attendants on an Indian army, whose work is to provide provender for the baggage-cattle; GRASS'ER, an extra or temporary worker in a printing-office.--adjs. GRASS'-GREEN, green with grass: green as grass; GRASS'-GROWN, grown over with grass.--ns. GRASS'HOPPER, a saltatorial, orthopterous insect, nearly allied to locusts and crickets, keeping quiet during the day among vegetation, but noisy at night; GRASS'INESS; GRASS'ING, the exposing of linen in fields to air and light for bleaching purposes; GRASS'-LAND, permanent pasture; GRASS'-OIL, a name under which several volatile oils derived from widely different plants are grouped; GRASS'-PLOT, a plot of grassy ground; GRASS'-TREE, a genus of Australian plants, with shrubby stems, tufts of long wiry foliage at the summit, and a tall flower-stalk, with a dense cylindrical spike of small flowers; GRASS'-WID'OW, a wife temporarily separated from her husband, often also a divorced woman, or one deserted by her husband; GRASS'-WRACK, the eel-grass growing abundantly on the sea-coast.--adj. GRASS'Y, covered with or resembling grass, green.--GO TO GRASS, to be turned out to pasture, esp. of a horse too old to work: to go into retirement, to rusticate: to fall violently (of a pugilist); LET THE GRASS GROW UNDER ONE'S FEET, to loiter, linger.--SPANISH GRASS (see ESPARTO). [A.S. gærs, græs; Ice., Ger., Dut., and Goth. gras; prob. allied to green and grow.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. Asparagus g. Bear's, Yucca filamentosa-g. Bermuda, Cynodon dactylon-g. Bitter, Aletris farinosa-g. Blue-eyed, Sisyrinchium Bermudianum-g. Brome, Bromus ciliatus-g. Brome, soft, Bromus ciliatus-g. Canary, cultivated, Phalaris Canariensis-g. Couch, Triticum repens-g. Dog, Triticum repens-g. Egyptian cock's foot, Gramen crucis cyperioides-g. Goat's, Scorzonera-g. Knot, Polygonum aviculare-g. Lily, Sisyrinchium Bermudianum. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  37. Herbage of which blades or leaves& stalks are eaten by cattle, horses, sheep, &c. (not let g. grow, g. does not grow, under one\'s feet, of person who wastes no time in doing something); any species of this (including in bot. use, excluding in pop. use, the cereals, reeds, & bamboos; usu. with defining words, as bunch, spear, -g., g. of Parnassus); grazing, pasture, (be at, go, put, send, turn out, to, g.; at g. fig., out of work, making holiday, &c.; so perh. g. widow, wife whose husband is absent); pasture land; grass-covered ground (keep off the g.); (Mining) earth\'s surface, pit-head; send, go, to g., knock (person), be knocked or fall, down; grasshopper, kinds of jumping& chirping insect (grasshopper-beam, working-beam in engine pivoted at end instead of in middle); g.-snake, common ringed snake; g.-tree, kinds of Australasian tree; hence grassless, grassy, aa. (Vb) cover with turf; lay (flax &c.) on g. to bleach; knock down, fell, (opponent); bring (fish) to bank, (bird by shot) to ground; (p.p., of golf-club) with face slightly sloped backward. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Gothic, Icelandic, Latin, Greek] Herbage; the plants which constitute the food of cattle and other beasts;—an endogenous plant having simple leaves, a stem generally jointed and tubular, a husky calyx, called glume, and the seed single. Cabinet Dictionary
  39. The common herb age of fields on which cattle feed. Complete Dictionary

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