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Definitions of grave

  1. causing fear or anxiety by threatening great harm; "a dangerous operation"; "a grave situation"; "a grave illness"; "grievous bodily harm"; "a serious wound"; "a serious turn of events"; "a severe case of pneumonia" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. write upon; engrave a pen, for example Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. shape (a material like stone or wood) by whittling away at it; "She is sculpting the block of marble into an image of her husband" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a place for the burial of a corpse (especially beneath the ground and marked by a tombstone); "he put flowers on his mother's grave" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a mark (`) placed above a vowel to indicate pronunciation Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. death of a person; "he went to his grave without forgiving me"; "from cradle to grave" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. of great gravity or crucial import; requiring serious thought; "grave responsibilities"; "faced a grave decision in a time of crisis"; "a grievous fault"; "heavy matters of state"; "the weighty matters to be discussed at the peace conference" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. dignified and somber in manner or character and committed to keeping promises; "a grave God-fearing man"; "a quiet sedate nature"; "as sober as a judge"; "a solemn promise"; "the judge was solemn as he pronounced sentence" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. carve, cut, or etch into a material or surface; "engrave a pen"; "engraved the winner's name onto the trophy cup" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. causing fear or anxiety by threatening great harm; "a dangerous operation"; "a grave situation"; "a grave illness"; "grievous bodily harm"; "a serious wound"; "a serious turn of events"; "a severe case of pneumonia"; "a life-threatening disease" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. Of great weight; heavy; ponderous. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Not light or gay; solemn; sober; plain; as, a grave color; a grave face. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Slow and solemn in movement. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To dig. [Obs.] Chaucer. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To carve or cut, as letters or figures, on some hard substance; to engrave. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To carve out or give shape to, by cutting with a chisel; to sculpture; as, to grave an image. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To impress deeply (on the mind); to fix indelibly. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To entomb; to bury. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To write or delineate on hard substances, by means of incised lines; to practice engraving. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. An excavation in the earth as a place of burial; also, any place of interment; a tomb; a sepulcher. Hence: Death; destruction. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To engrave. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. To clean, as a vessel's bottom, of barnacles, grass, etc., and pay it over with pitch; - so called because graves or greaves was formerly used for this purpose. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Not acute or sharp; low; deep; - said of sound; as, a grave note or key. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Serious; solemn; thoughtful; sedate; important. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. An excavation or hole in the earth for the reception of a dead body; place of burial. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. To shape or carve by cutting with a chisel; engrave. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. Gravely. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Graveness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Noting symptoms of a serious or dangerous character. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  30. To carve or cut, on a hard substance: to engrave. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. To engrave:-pa.p. graved or graven. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. A pit graved or dug out, esp. one in which to bury the dead: any place of burial: (fig.) death: destruction. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. To smear with graves or greaves, a mixture of tallow, rosin, etc., boiled together. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. (fig.) Weighty: of importance: serious: not gay: sober: solemn: not acute: low. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. A pit for the dead; death. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. Graved or graven. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. Heavy; important; serious; not acute. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To carve; engrave. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. Important; serious; sober. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. An excavation in the earth for the burial of a dead body; the abode of the dead. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Of weight; of importance; of a serious character; not gay or showy; solemn; sedate; low or depressed, as opposed to acute; heavy or long-sounding. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. A pit dug to bury a dead human body; any place of burial; a place of great slaughter or mortality; death or destruction. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To carve or cut on stone or other hard substance with a chisel or edged tool; to engrave; to form by cutting with a chisel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To clean a ship's bottom, and cover it with pitch. See Graves. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. To carve; to engrave. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. Of importance; momentous; weighty; influential; sedate; serious; - said of character, relations, etc.; as, grave deportment, character, influence, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. Serious; sedate; not gay, light, or trifling; weighty; momentous. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. The pit in which a dead body is laid; a tomb; a sepulchre. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. To carve or cut letters or figures on any hard substance, as stone or wood; to carve or form. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. To clean, as a vessel's bottom, of barnacles, grass, etc., and pay it over with pitch; -- so called because graves or greaves was formerly used for this purpose. mso.anu.edu.au
  51. Of importance; momentous; weighty; influential; sedate; serious; -- said of character, relations, etc.; as, grave deportment, character, influence, etc. mso.anu.edu.au
  52. Not acute or sharp; low; deep; -- said of sound; as, a grave note or key. mso.anu.edu.au
  53. Among the ancient Hebrews graves were outside of cities in the open field ( Luke 7:12 ; John 11:30 ). Kings ( 1 Kings 2:10 ) and prophets ( 1 Samuel 25:1 ) were generally buried within cities. Graves were generally grottoes or caves, natural or hewn out in rocks ( Isaiah 22:16 ; Matthew 27:60 ). There were family cemeteries ( Genesis 47:29 ; 50:5 ; 2 Sam 19:37 ). Public burial-places were assigned to the poor ( Jeremiah 26:23 ; 2 Kings 23:6 ). Graves were usually closed with stones, which were whitewashed, to warn strangers against contact with them ( Matthew 23:27 ), which caused ceremonial pollution ( Numbers 19:16 ). There were no graves in Jerusalem except those of the kings, and according to tradition that of the prophetess Huldah. biblestudytools.com
  54. A sepulcher. A place where a dead body Is Interred. thelawdictionary.org
  55. A place where a dead body is interred. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  56. The violation of the grave, by taking up the dead body, or stealing the coffin or grave clothes, is a misdemeanor at common law. 1 Russ. on. Cr. 414. A singular case, illustrative of this subject, occurred in Louisiana. A son, who inherited a large estate from his mother, buried her with all her jewels, worth $2000; he then made a sale of all he inherited from his mother, for $30,000. After this, a thief broke the grave and stole the jewels, which, after his conviction, were left with the clerk of the court, to be delivered to the owner. The son claimed them, and so did the purchaser of the inheritance; it was held that the jewels, although buried with the mother, belonged to the son, and, that they passed to the purchaser by a sale of the whole inheritance. 6 Robins. L. R. 488. See Dead Body. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  57. In New York, by statutory enactment, it is provided, that every person who shall open a grave, or other place of interment, with intent, 1. To remove the dead body of any human being, for the purpose of selling the same, or for the purpose of dissection; or, 2. To steal the coffin, or any part thereof, or the vestments or other articles interred with any dead body, shall, upon conviction, be punished by imprisonment, in a state prison, not exceeding two years, or in a county gaol, not exceeding six months, or by fine not, exceeding two hundred and fifty dollars, or by both such fine and imprisonment. Rev. Stat. part 4, tit. 5, art. 3, §15. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  58. gr[=a]v, v.t. to carve or cut on a hard substance: to engrave.--v.i. to engrave:--pa.p. graved or gr[=a]v'en.--n. a pit graved or dug out, esp. one in which to bury the dead: any place of burial: the abode of the dead: (fig.) death: destruction.--n.pl. GRAVE'-CLOTHES, the clothes in which the dead are buried.--n. GRAVE'-DIG'GER, one who digs graves.--adj. GRAVE'LESS (Shak.), without a grave, unburied.--ns. GRAVE'-MAK'ER (Shak.), a grave-digger; GRAVE'-STONE, a stone laid over, or placed at the head of, a grave as a memorial; GRAVE'YARD, a yard or enclosure used as a burial-ground.--WITH ONE FOOT IN THE GRAVE, on the very borders of death. [A.S. grafan; Dut. graven, Ger. graben; Gr. graphein, to scratch, L. scrib[)e]re, to write.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  59. gr[=a]v, v.t. to smear with graves or greaves, a mixture of tallow, rosin, &c. boiled together.--ns.pl. GRAVES, GREAVES, tallow-drippings. [See GREAVES.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  60. gr[=a]v, adj. of importance: serious: not gay or showy: sober: solemn; weighty: (mus.) not acute: low.--n. the grave accent, or its sign (`).--adv. GRAVE'LY.--n. GRAVE'NESS. [Fr.,--L. gravis.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  61. gr[=a]v, n. a count, prefect, a person holding office, as in landgrave, margrave, burgrave, &c. [Dut. graaf, Ger. graf.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  62. Serious-g. Plant, Datura sanguinea. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  63. [Latin] Serious; as a G. disease, G. prognosis, G. icterus. na
  64. [Latin] Of sounds, low-pitched. na
  65. Excavation to receive corpse, mound or monument over it, (secret as the g., quite; make one turn in his g., of act &c. that he would have been pained by while alive; some one walking on my g., said when one shivers unaccountably; one FOOT in g.), whence graveless a.; being dead, death, Hades, whence graveward adv. & a.; receptacle of or for what is dead (g. of reputations, place where many reputations have been lost); trench for earthing up potatoes &c.; g.-clothes, wrappings in which corpse is buried; g.-digger, lit., also kinds of insect that bury bodies of insects &c. as food for their larvae; gravestone, stone over g., inscribed stone at head or foot of g.; graveyard, burial ground. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  66. (p.p. -en, -ed, asstated). (Archaic) bury (-ed); (archaic) carve, sculpture, engrave, (material, representation, inscription; -en, -ed; graven image, idol); (fig.) fix indelibly (on, in, mind &c.; -en, -ed). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  67. Important, weighty, needing serious thought; (of faults, difficulties, responsibilities, symptoms) formidable, threatening, serious; dignified, solemn, slow-moving, not gay; sombre, plain, not showy; hence gravely adv. (Of accent) low-pitched, not acute, (g. ACCENT; n., g. accent). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. Clean (ship\'s bottom) by burning off accretions& tarring while aground or in graving-dock. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  69. Serious ; severe. American pocket medical dictionary.
  70. n. [Anglo-Saxon] An excavation in the earth as a place of burial; place of interment; tomb; sepulchre;—any place of great mortality or slaughter; field of death or destruction;—pl. Graves, the sediment of melted tallow. Cabinet Dictionary
  71. The place in which the dead are reposited. Complete Dictionary
  72. Solemn, serious, sober; of weight; not showy, not tawdry; not sharp of found, not acute. Complete Dictionary

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