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Definitions of grind

  1. To be rubbed together; to perform the operation of grinding; to be pulverized, polished, or sharpened by grinding; to study for an examination. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To reduce to powder by friction, as in a mill, or with the teeth; to crush into small fragments; to produce as by the action of millstones. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To wear down, polish, or sharpen, by friction; to make smooth, sharp, or pointed; to whet, as a knife or drill; to rub against one another, as teeth, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To oppress by severe exactions; to harass. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To study hard for examination. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To reduce to powder by friction: to wear down or sharpen by rubbing: to rub together: to oppress or harass. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To rub to powder; wear down by rubbing; oppress. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To wear down or pulverize by friction; sharpen; chafe; oppress; harass. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. To perform the operation of grinding something; to turn the millstones. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To become ground or pulverized by friction; as, this corn grinds well. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To become polished or sharpened by friction; as, glass grinds smooth; steel grinds to a sharp edge. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To move with much difficulty or friction; to grate. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To perform hard aud distasteful service; to drudge; to study hard, as for an examination. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To sharpen or polish something, or to make something into powder, by friction; be grated or rubbed together; college slang, to study hard. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To be moved or rubbed together:-pr.p. grinding; pa.t. and pa.p. ground. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. reduce to small pieces or particles by pounding or abrading; "grind the spices in a mortar"; "mash the garlic" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. make a grating or grinding sound by rubbing together; "grate one's teeth in anger" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. To be chafed, polished, or sharpened by rubbing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. To toil mechanically. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. To reduce to small pieces or powder by friction; to wear down, sharpen, or smooth by friction; to grate; to oppress; to harass; to teach or study in preparation for an examination. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. To break and reduce to powder by friction or rubbing, as between stones; to sharpen or polish; to oppress by severe exactions; in familiar language, to prepare a student for examination, and to prepare one's self; to perform the operation of grinding. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. hard monotonous routine work Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. an insignificant student who is ridiculed as being affected or studying excessively Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. The act of reducing to powder, or of sharpening, by friction. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Any severe continuous work or occupation; esp., hard and uninteresting study. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A hard student; a dig. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The act of sharpening, polishing, etc.; laborious and tedious work; wearisome routine; as, the daily grind; college slang, a student who studies laboriously. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Study for an examination, considered as irksome. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. Ground. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

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Usage examples for grind

  1. Billy Roberts was there, and he greeted Andy commiseratingly, as one speaks to the sick or to one in mourning; the tone made Andy grind his teeth, though he knew in his heart that Billy Roberts wished him well- up to the point of losing the contest to him, which was beyond human nature. – The Happy Family by Bertha Muzzy Bower
  2. Sisters, believe me, the way those men were enjoying themselves was enough to make a genuine woman grind her teeth. – Phemie Frost's Experiences by Ann S. Stephens
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