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Definitions of ground

  1. fix firmly and stably; "anchor the lamppost in concrete" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the part of a scene (or picture) that lies behind objects in the foreground; "he posed her against a background of rolling hills" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. broken or pounded into small fragments; used of e.g. ore or stone; "paved with crushed bluestone"; "ground glass is used as an abrasive" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a connection between an electrical device and the earth (which is a zero voltage) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the loose soft material that makes up a large part of the land surface; "they dug into the earth outside the church" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. use as a basis for; found on; "base a claim on some observation" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the first or preliminary coat of paint or size applied to a surface Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. bring to the ground, as of vessels Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. (art) the surface (as a wall or canvas) prepared to take the paint for a painting Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a relatively homogeneous percept extending back of the figure on which attention is focused Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a position to be won or defended in battle (or as if in battle); "they gained ground step by step"; "they fought to regain the lost ground" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a rational motive for a belief or action; "the reason that war was declared"; "the grounds for their declaration" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. material in the top layer of the surface of the earth in which plants can grow (especially with reference to its quality or use); "the land had never been plowed"; "good agricultural soil" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. cover with a primer; apply a primer to Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. hit or reach the ground Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. a relation that provides the foundation for something; "they were on a friendly footing"; "he worked on an interim basis" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. instruct someone in the fundamentals of a subject Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. connect to a ground; "ground the electrical connections for safety reasons" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. hit onto the ground Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. hit a groundball; "he grounded to the second baseman" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. throw to the ground in order to stop play and avoid being tackled behind the line of scrimmage Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. place or put on the ground Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. confine or restrict to the ground; "After the accident, they grounded the plane and the pilot" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. bring to the ground; "the storm grounded the ship" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. The softer inorganic matter composing part of the surface of the globe, in distinction from the firm rock; soil of all kinds, including gravel, clay, loam, and the like; sometimes, soil favorable to the growth of plants; the visible surface of the globe; the ground; as, loose earth; rich earth. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The surface of the earth; the outer crust of the globe, or some indefinite portion of it. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A floor or pavement supposed to rest upon the earth. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Any definite portion of the earth's surface; region; territory; country. Hence: A territory appropriated to, or resorted to, for a particular purpose; the field or place of action; as, a hunting or fishing ground; a play ground. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Land; estate; possession; field; esp. (pl.), the gardens, lawns, fields, etc., belonging to a homestead; as, the grounds of the estate are well kept. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. The basis on which anything rests; foundation. Hence: The foundation of knowledge, belief, or conviction; a premise, reason, or datum; ultimate or first principle; cause of existence or occurrence; originating force or agency; as, the ground of my hope. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. That surface upon which the figures of a composition are set, and which relieves them by its plainness, being either of one tint or of tints but slightly contrasted with one another; as, crimson Bowers on a white ground. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. In sculpture, a flat surface upon which figures are raised in relief. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. In point lace, the net of small meshes upon which the embroidered pattern is applied; as, Brussels ground. See Brussels lace, under Brussels. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A gummy composition spread over the surface of a metal to be etched, to prevent the acid from eating except where an opening is made by the needle. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. A composition in which the bass, consisting of a few bars of independent notes, is continually repeated to a varying melody. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. The tune on which descants are raised; the plain song. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. A conducting connection with the earth, whereby the earth is made part of an electrical circuit. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. Sediment at the bottom of liquors or liquids; dregs; lees; feces; as, coffee grounds. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. The pit of a theater. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To lay, set, or run, on the ground. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To found; to fix or set, as on a foundation, reason, or principle; to furnish a ground for; to fix firmly. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To instruct in elements or first principles. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. To connect with the ground so as to make the earth a part of an electrical circuit. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. To cover with a ground, as a copper plate for etching (see Ground, n., 5); or as paper or other materials with a uniform tint as a preparation for ornament. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. To run aground; to strike the bottom and remain fixed; as, the ship grounded on the bar. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. imp. & p. p. of Grind. Newage Dictionary DB
  47. One of the pieces of wood, flush with the plastering, to which moldings, etc., are attached; - usually in the plural. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. imp. & p. p. of Grind. Webster Dictionary DB
  49. Of grind. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  50. The earth or soil; surface of a floor or pavement; land; territory; country; estate; usually in plural; foundation; cause or reason; origin; original principle. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  51. To place or set on or in the earth; teach the first principles to. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  52. To run on to land; said of vessels. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  53. Pa.t. and pa.p. of GRIND. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  54. The surface of the earth: a portion of the earth's surface: land: field: the floor, etc.: position: field or place of action: (lit. or fig.) that on which something is raised: foundation: reason: (art.) the surface on which the figures are represented. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  55. To fix on a foundation or principle: to instruct in first principles. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  56. To strike the bottom and remain fixed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  57. To run aground. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  58. Of to grind. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  59. Surface of the earth; soil; land; foundation. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  60. To fix as a foundation; instruct in principles. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  61. To strike the bottom, as a ship. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  62. To found; establish; train in first principles. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. To fix in the ground; run aground. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. To run aground; fall to the ground. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  65. Imp & pp. of GRIND, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  66. The surface of the earth; land. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  67. A base; starting point; reason. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  68. Dregs. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  69. On the ground; radical; fundamental. To break ground, to be the first to open up. To gain ground, to advance; to proceed forward; to gain credit; to prevail. To lose ground, to retire; to retreat; to lose credit; to decline. To give ground, to recede; to yield advantage. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  70. The surface of the earth; territory; land; the surface of a floor or pavement; foundation; cause or reason; first principle; that which is first put on the surface on which a figure or object is represented; the principal colour, to which others are considered as ornamental; composition spread over the surface of the metal to be etched; field or place of action; the name given to a composition in which the base, consisting of a few bars of independent notes, is continually repeated to a continually varying melody. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  71. To lay or set on the ground; to base; to instruct in first principles; to run aground. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  72. Did grind. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  73. The earth or soil, as distinguished from air or water; the surface or upper part of the earth; soil; territory or region; estate or possession; that which supports anything; fundamental cause; primary reason; in a painting, the primary or principal colour; fundamental substance. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  74. To lay or place on the ground; to settle in first principles; to fasten or strike on the bottom, as a ship in too shallow water. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  75. One of the pieces of wood, flush with the plastering, to which moldings, etc., are attached; -- usually in the plural. mso.anu.edu.au
  76. 1. Soil; earth; a portion of the earth's surface appropriated to private useand under cultivation or susceptible of cultivation.Though this term is sometimes used in conveyances and in statutes as equivalent to"land." it is properly of a more limited signification, because it applies strictly only to tiiesurface, while "land" includes everything beneath the surface, and because "ground"always means dry land, whereas "land" may and often does include the beds of lakesand streams and other surfaces under water. See Wood v. Carter, 70 III. App. 218;State v. Jersey City, 25 N. J. Law, 520; Com. v. Roxbury, 9 Gray (Mass.) 491. thelawdictionary.org
  77. grownd, pa.t. and pa.p. of grind. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  78. grownd, n. the surface of the earth: a portion of the earth's surface: land, field, soil: the floor, &c.: position: field or place of action: (lit. or fig.) that on which something is raised: foundation: sufficient reason: (art) the surface on which the figures are represented.--v.t. to fix on a foundation or principle: to instruct in first principles: to cover with a layer of plaster, &c., as a basis for painting: to coat with a composition, as a surface to be etched.--v.i. to strike the bottom and remain fixed.--ns. GROUND'AGE, the tax paid by a ship for the space occupied while in port; GROUND'-ANG'LING, fishing without a float, with a weight placed a few inches from the hook--called also Bottom-fishing; GROUND'-ASH, a sapling of ash; GROUND'-BAIT, bait dropped to the bottom of the water.--adv. GROUND'EDLY (Browning), on good grounds.--ns. GROUND'ER, at baseball, &c., a ball thrown low rather than rising into the air; GROUND'-FLOOR, the floor of a house on a level with the street or exterior ground; GROUND'-GAME, hares, rabbits, as distinguished from winged game; GROUND'-HOG, the American marmot, or woodchuck: the aardvark of Africa; GROUND'-HOLD (Spens.), ground-tackle; GROUND-ICE, the ice formed at the bottom of a water first--also AN'CHOR-ICE; GROUND'ING, the background of embroidery, &c.; GROUND'-[=I]'VY, a common British creeping-plant whose leaves were once used for flavouring ale (gill-ale or gell-ale).--adj. GROUND'LESS, without ground, foundation, or reason.--adv. GROUND'LESSLY.--ns. GROUND'LESSNESS; GROUND'LING, a fish which keeps near the bottom of the water, esp. the spinous loach: a spectator in the pit of a theatre---hence one of the common herd: (pl.) the vulgar.--adj. (Lamb) base.--ns. GROUND'-NUT, ground-bean, or pea-nut, the fruit of the annual leguminous plant Arachis hypogæa; GROUND'-OAK, a sapling of oak; GROUND'-PLAN, plan of the horizontal section of the lowest or ground story of a building: GROUND'-PLOT, the plot of ground on which a building stands; GROUND'-RENT, rent paid to a landlord for the use of the ground for a specified term, usually in England ninety-nine years.--n.pl. GROUNDS, dregs of drink: sediment at the bottom of liquors (explained by Skeat as Celtic--Gael. grunndas, lees, grunnd, bottom, Ir. gruntas, grunnt, bottom).--ns. GROUND'SELL, GROUND'SILL, the timber of a building which lies next to the ground; GROUND-SQUIRR'EL, the chipmuck or hackee; GROUND'-SWELL, a broad, deep undulation of the ocean, proceeding from a distant storm; GROUND'-TACK'LE, the tackle necessary for securing a vessel at anchor; GROUND'WORK, that which forms the ground or foundation of anything: the basis: the essential part: the first principle.--GROUND ANNUAL, in the law of Scotland, an annual payment, sometimes called a rent-charge, made for land--a substitute for feu-duty.--BE ON ONE'S OWN GROUND, to be dealing with a matter in which one is specially versed; BREAK GROUND, to take the first step in any project; FALL TO THE GROUND, to come to nothing; GAIN GROUND, to advance, to obtain an advantage; GIVE GROUND, to yield advantage; LOSE GROUND, to retire, to lose advantage; SLIPPERY GROUND, an insecure footing; STAND, or HOLD, ONE'S GROUND, to stand firm. [A.S. grund; most prob. grund-en, pa.p. of grindan, and orig. meaning 'earth ground small;' cog. with Ger. grund, Ice. grunnr.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  79. Bottom of sea (now chiefly fig., as touch g., come to something solid after vague talk &c.; of ship, take g., strand), (pl.) dregs, esp. of coffee, whence groundy a.; base, foundation, motive, valid reason, (on the g. of, by reason or under pretext of; on public &c. gg.), whence groundless a., groundlessly adv., groundlessness n.; substratum, underlying part, surface worked upon in embroidery, painting, &c., undecorated part, prevailing colour or tone, (Etching) composition spread on metal& cut through with needle where acid is to act; surface of earth (fall, be dashed, to the g., be abandoned, fail, of scheme, hope; BREAK g.; down to the g. colloq., in all respects, thoroughly; above g., alive; cut the g. from under one\'s feet, anticipate& stultify his arguments or plans); (pl.) enclosed land for ornament or recreation attached to house; position, area, or distance, on earth\'s surface (cover much g., of inquiry, report, &c., be far-reaching; stand, shift, one\'s g., maintain, change, one\'s argument or intention; gain g., advance; lose, give, g., retreat, decline); area of special kind or use (fishing-gg.; forbidden g., subject that must be avoided; classic g., historic place; cricket &c. -g.); person\'s property in land; (Cricket) his &c. g., behind popping-crease (in, out of, his g.), paid staff of players attached to club; (in names of birds) terrestrial, (of beasts) burrowing or lying on g., (of plants) dwarfish or trailing; g.-ash, ash sapling, walking-stick of this; g.-bait n. & v.t., (prepare with) bait thrown to bottom of intended fishing-g. to attract fish; g.-box, small BOX used to edge garden beds; g.-colour, first coat of paint, prevailing colour on which design is done; g.-fish, living at bottom; g.-fishing, with bait near bottom; g.-floor, rooms &c. on level of outside g. (get in on the g.-f., be admitted to company &c. on same terms as promoters); g. game, hares, rabbits, &c.; g.-gudgeon, loach; g.-hog, Amer. marmot; g.-ice, formed at bottom of water, anchor-ice; g.-ivy, ale-hoof, creeping herb with bluish-purple flower& kidney-shaped leaf; g.-landlord, owner of g. leased for building; g.-note, on which a common chord is built, fundamental bass; g.-nut, (edible tuber of) N.-Amer. wild bean, also W.-Ind. & W.-Afr. pea with pod ripening under g.; g.-pine, herb with resinous smell, also clubmoss; g.-plan, plane drawing of divisions of building at g. level, also outline or general design of anything; g.-rent, that paid to g.-landlord; g.-sea, heavy sea without apparent cause; g.-swell, heavy sea caused by distant or past storm or earthquake; g.-torpedo, fixed to bottom of sea; groundwork, foundation or basis (usu. fig.), chief ingredient, general surface of thing showing where not overlaid with embroidery or other ornament. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  80. Base, establish, (institution, principle, belief) on some fact or authority (in pass. also in; p.p., well, ill, &c., founded, also abs. =well founded, whence groundedly adv.); instruct thoroughly (inelements), whence grounding n.; prepare g. of (embroidery &c.); lay (esp. arms) on g., (Electr.) connect with earth as conductor; alight on g.; run (t. & i.) ashore, strand. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  81. GRIND. German glass, made nontransparent by grinding. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  82. n. [Anglo-Saxon, German, Gothic] The surface of the earth; dry land;—region; territory;—land; estate; possession;—floor; pavement;—basis; foundation; hence, first principle; reason; cause; origin;—the surface on which an object or figure is represented;—the primary colour on which others are wrought;—a plain tune or air; a tune on which variations are made;—a place or field of action;—a foil or set-off;—credit; advantage;—pl. Sediment; dregs; lees. Cabinet Dictionary
  83. The earth, considered as solid or as low; the earth as distinguished from air or water; land, country; region, territory; farm, estate, possession; the floor or level of the place; dregs,lees, faeces; the first stratum of paint upon which the figures are afterwards painted; the fundamental substance, that by which the additional or accidental parts are supported; first hint, first traces of an invention; the first principles of knowledge; the fundamental cause; the field or place of action; the space occupied by an army as they fight, advance, or retire; the state in which one is with respect to opponents or competitors; the foil to set a thing off. Complete Dictionary
  84. The preterite and part. past of GRIND. Complete Dictionary

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