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Definitions of habit

  1. excessive use of drugs Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. put a habit on Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a pattern of behavior acquired through frequent repetition; "she had a habit twirling the ends of her hair"; "long use had hardened him to it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a distinctive attire (as the costume of a religious order) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an established custom; "it was their habit to dine at 7 every evening" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (religion) a distinctive attire (as the costume of a religious order) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. To inhabit. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. The usual condition or state of a person or thing, either natural or acquired, regarded as something had, possessed, and firmly retained; as, a religious habit; his habit is morose; elms have a spreading habit; esp., physical temperament or constitution; as, a full habit of body. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The general appearance and manner of life of a living organism. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Fixed or established custom; ordinary course of conduct; practice; usage; hence, prominently, the involuntary tendency or aptitude to perform certain actions which is acquired by their frequent repetition; as, habit is second nature; also, peculiar ways of acting; characteristic forms of behavior. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Outward appearance; attire; dress; hence, a garment; esp., a closely fitting garment or dress worn by ladies; as, a riding habit. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To dress; to clothe; to array. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Acquired or learned responses which are regularly manifested. Medical Dictionary DB
  14. The ordinary course of conduct; general condition or tendency; disposition; established custom; dress; a woman's riding dress; the distinctive dress worn by members of a religious order. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To dress; furnish with a garb. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. 1. A practice or custom established by frequent repetition of the same act. 2. Habitus. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  17. Accustomed practice; constitution; condition. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  18. Ordinary course of conduct: tendency to perform certain actions: general condition or tendency, as of the body: pracitce: custom: outward appearance, dress: a garment, esp. a tight-fitting dress, with a skirt, worn by ladies on horseback. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To dress:-pr.p. habiting; pa.p. habited. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To dress; to array. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. Ordinary state; acquired tendency; custom; dress; a garment. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To dress. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. An acquired tendency toward the repetition of an act or thought; habitual course of action or conduct. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. Habitual condition; temperament. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. An outer garment; costume; a woman's dress for horse backriding. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Ordinary condition or state; a tendency or aptitude acquired by custom or frequent repetition; practice; custom; ordinary manner; dress; lady's riding-dress; general appearance. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To accustom; to habituate. [Obs.] Chapman. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Dress; the particular state of the body; a coat with a long skirt worn by ladies on horseback; the tendency to any action or practice occasioned by custom or frequent repetition; manner; way; in bot., the general external appearance of a plant. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. A disposition or condition of the body or mind acquired by custom or a usualrepetition of the same act or function. Knickerbocker L. Ins. Co. v. Foley, 105 U. S. 354,26 L. Ed. 1055 ; Conner v. Citizens' St. R. Co., 146 Ind. 430, 45 N. E. 662; State v. Skillicorn,104 Iowa, 97, 73 N. W. 503; State v. Robinson, 111 Ala. 4S2, 20 South. 30. thelawdictionary.org
  30. A disposition or condition of the body or mind acquired by custom or a frequent repetition of the same act. See 2 Mart. Lo. Rep. N. S. 622. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  31. The habit of dealing has always an important bearing upon the construction of commercial contracts. A ratification will be inferred from the mere habit of dealing between the parties; as, if a broker has been accustomed to settle losses on policies in a particular manner, without any objection being made, or with the silent approbation of his principal, and he should afterward settle other policies in the same manner, to which no objection should be made within a reasonable time, a just presumption would arise of an implied ratification; for if the principal did not agree to such settlement he should have declared his dissent. 2 Bouv. Inst. 1313-14. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  32. hab'it, n. ordinary course of conduct: tendency to perform certain actions: general condition or tendency, as of the body: practice: custom: outward appearance: dress, esp. any official or customary costume: a garment, esp. a tight-fitting dress, with a skirt, worn by ladies on horseback.--v.t. to dress:--pr.p. hab'iting; pa.p. hab'ited.--adj. HAB'ITED, clothed, dressed.--ns. HAB'IT-MAK'ER, one who makes women's riding-habits; HAB'IT-SHIRT, a thin muslin or lace under-garment worn by women on the neck and shoulders, under the dress.--adj. HABIT'[=U]AL, formed or acquired by frequent use: customary.--adv. HABIT'[=U]ALLY.--v.t. HABIT'[=U][=A]TE, to cause to acquire a habit: to accustom.--ns. HABIT[=U][=A]'TION; HAB'IT[=U]DE, tendency from acquiring a habit: usual manner; HABITUÉ (hab-it'[=u]-[=a]), a habitual frequenter of any place of entertainment, &c.--HABIT AND REPUTE, a phrase in Scotch law to denote something so notorious that it affords strong and generally conclusive evidence of the facts to which it refers; HABIT OF BODY, the general condition of the body as outwardly apparent: any constitutional tendency or weakness. [Fr.,--L. habitus, state, dress--hab[=e]re, to have.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  33. Habit is the aptitude for repeating certain acts: - or, a facility, which results from the frequent repetition of the same act. It is, according to vulgar expression, 'a second nature. Habit may predispose to certain diseases, or it may protect against them. It ought not to be lost sight of, in attending to the progress of disease, or of its treatment. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  34. [Latin] The general set of appearances indicative of a special state of the body as a whole or of one of its organs. Full h. (Apoplectic h.), a condition of plethora, indicated by engorgement of the visible blood-vessels, flushed face, and a tendency to fleshiness. Glaucomatous h., see Glaucomatous. na
  35. [Latin] A fixed practice; especially, a practice established by constant repetition until it has become involuntary. In a restricted sense, the practice of taking a harmful drug; as Cocaine h., Morphine h., Opium h. H. chorea, H. spasm, spasmodic uncontrollable movements of certain voluntary muscles occurring habitually; especially, involuntary movements (h. movements) that one habitually makes whenever performing a certain act, such as thinking or talking. na
  36. Settled tendency or practice, as he is in, has (fallen into), the or a h. of contradiction; mental constitution, esp. h. of mind; bodily constitution, as a man of corpulent h.; (Bot., Zool.) mode of growth; (archaic) dress, esp. of religious order; (also riding-h.) lady\'s riding-dress. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. Clothe; (archaic) inhabit. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. A fixed or constant practice, established by frequent repetition. American pocket medical dictionary.
  39. Predisposition ; bodily temperament. American pocket medical dictionary.
  40. n. [Latin] Dress; garment; clothes in general;—an upper coat or cloak worn by ladies; a coat with a long skirt worn in riding;—usual state or condition; custom; practice; usage;—particular state or condition of the body; bodily temperament;—mental condition acquired by custom or practice; tendency to repeat an action or act in the same way;—mode; manner; way; style. Cabinet Dictionary
  41. State of any thing, as habit of body; dress, accoutrement; habit is a power or ability in man of doing any thing by frequent doing; custom, inveterate use. Complete Dictionary

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