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Definitions of hair

  1. filamentous hairlike growth on a plant; "peach fuzz" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a very small distance or space; "they escaped by a hair's-breadth"; "they lost by a hair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. any of the cylindrical filaments characteristically growing from the epidermis of a mammal; "there is a hair in my soup" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. dense growth of hairs covering the body or parts of it (as on the human head); helps prevent heat loss; "he combed his hair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a very small distance or space; "they escaped by a hair's-breadth"; "they lost the election by a whisker" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. The collection or mass of filaments growing from the skin of an animal, and forming a covering for a part of the head or for any part or the whole of the body. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. One the above-mentioned filaments, consisting, in invertebrate animals, of a long, tubular part which is free and flexible, and a bulbous root imbedded in the skin. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Hair (human or animal) used for various purposes; as, hair for stuffing cushions. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. A slender outgrowth from the chitinous cuticle of insects, spiders, crustaceans, and other invertebrates. Such hairs are totally unlike those of vertebrates in structure, composition, and mode of growth. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. An outgrowth of the epidermis, consisting of one or of several cells, whether pointed, hooked, knobbed, or stellated. Internal hairs occur in the flower stalk of the yellow frog lily (Nuphar). Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A spring device used in a hair-trigger firearm. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A haircloth. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Any very small distance, or degree; a hairbreadth. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. (human or animal) used for various purposes; as, hair for stuffing cushions. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. One of the small filaments growing out of the skin of any animal; the mass of such threadlike growth; minute fibers on the surface of plants. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. A filament growing from the skin of an animal: the whole mass of hairs which forms a covering for the head or the whole body: (bot.) minute hair-like processes on the cuticle of plants: anything very small and fine. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. Filament growing from the skin of an animal; the mass of hair; any fine filament. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. A filament growing from the skin of an animal; such filaments collectively; any similar outgrowth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. A small filament, with a bulbous root, growing from the skin of an animal; the mass of filaments growing from the skin of an animal, and forming an integument or covering; anything very small or fine; minute hair-like filaments on the surface of plants. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. Fibres or threads of different degrees of fineness which cover the bodies of many animals; anything very small and fine having length; a hair, a single hair; a fine slender thread or filament; the hair, the whole collection or body of threads or filaments growing upon an animal, or upon any distinct part. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. A threadlike or filamentous outgrowth of the epidermis of animals; any outgrowth of the epidermis consisting of one or more cells, and very varied in shape. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.

Usage examples for hair

  1. " My dear child," she said, " what lovely hair you have! – Elsie Dinsmore by Martha Finley
  2. She was older, and her hair was gray, but her eyes and her voice had not changed. – The Second Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
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