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Definitions of hand

  1. a card player in a game of bridge; "we need a 4th hand for bridge" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the cards held in a card game by a given player at any given time; "I didn't hold a good hand all evening"; "he kept trying to see my hand" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. place into the hands or custody of; "Turn the files over to me, please"; "He turned over the prisoner to his lawyers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. physical assistance; "give me a hand with the chores" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. terminal part of the forelimb in certain vertebrates (e.g. apes or kangaroos); "the kangaroo's forearms seem undeveloped but the powerful five-fingered hands are skilled at feinting and clouting"- Springfield (Mass.) Union Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a rotating pointer on the face of a timepiece; "the big hand counts the minutes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the (prehensile) extremity of the superior limb; "he had the hands of a surgeon"; "he extended his mitt" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. ability; "he wanted to try his hand at singing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. one of two sides of an issue; "on the one hand..., but on the other hand..." Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. something written by hand; "she recognized his handwriting"; "his hand was illegible" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a round of applause to signify approval; "give the little lady a great big hand" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a hired laborer on a farm or ranch; "the hired hand fixed the railing"; "a ranch hand" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a position given by its location to the side of an object; "objections were voiced on every hand" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. a member of the crew of a ship; "all hands on deck" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. a unit of length equal to 4 inches; used in measuring horses; "the horse stood 20 hands" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. guide or conduct or usher somewhere; "hand the elderly lady into the taxi" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. place into the hands or custody of; "hand me the spoon, please"; "Turn the files over to me, please"; "He turned over the prisoner to his lawyers" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in man and monkeys, and the corresponding part in many other animals; manus; paw. See Manus. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. That which resembles, or to some extent performs the office of, a human hand Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A limb of certain animals, as the foot of a hawk, or any one of the four extremities of a monkey. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. An index or pointer on a dial; as, the hour or minute hand of a clock. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Side; part; direction, either right or left. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Power of performance; means of execution; ability; skill; dexterity. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Actual performance; deed; act; workmanship; agency; hence, manner of performance. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. An agent; a servant, or laborer; a workman, trained or competent for special service or duty; a performer more or less skillful; as, a deck hand; a farm hand; an old hand at speaking. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Handwriting; style of penmanship; as, a good, bad or running hand. Hence, a signature. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Agency in transmission from one person to another; as, to buy at first hand, that is, from the producer, or when new; at second hand, that is, when no longer in the producer's hand, or when not new. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Rate; price. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. That which is, or may be, held in a hand at once Webster Dictionary DB
  30. The quota of cards received from the dealer. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A bundle of tobacco leaves tied together. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. The small part of a gunstock near the lock, which is grasped by the hand in taking aim. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To give, pass, or transmit with the hand; as, he handed them the letter. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To lead, guide, or assist with the hand; to conduct; as, to hand a lady into a carriage. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To manage; as, I hand my oar. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To seize; to lay hands on. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To pledge by the hand; to handfast. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To cooperate. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A gambling game played by American Indians, consisting of guessing the whereabouts of bits of ivory or the like, which are passed rapidly from hand to hand. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. A measure equal to a hand's breadth, - four inches; a palm. Chiefly used in measuring the height of horses. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. Personal possession; ownership; hence, control; direction; management; - usually in the plural. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To furl; - said of a sail. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. The divided and lower part of the human arm connected with the wrist; a similar member terminating the fore-limb of certain animals; something resembling this member in appearance or use; a measure of four inches; ability or skill; right or left side; possession; style of writing; an employee who labors with his hands; a sailor; cards held; a game; pledge of betrothal; nearness; control; authority; agency of; index of any kind; turn of a player to serve the ball at tennis, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. To give or lead with the hand. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  45. Belonging to, or used by, the hand. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  46. Manus, the terminal portion of the upper extremity below the forearm, comprising the carpus, metacarpus, and phalanges. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  47. Extremity of arm, below the wrist. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  48. The extremity of the arm below the wrist: that which does the duty of a hand by pointing, as the hand of a clock: the fore-foot of a horse: a measure of four inches: an agent or workman: performance: power or manner of performing: skill: possession: style of handwriting: side: direction. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  49. To give with the hand: to lead or conduct: (naut.) to furl, as sails. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  50. HANDER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  51. The extremity of the arm below the wrist; anything which points; a workman; agency; handwriting. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  52. To give with the hand; conduct by the hand. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  53. To give, pass, deliver, lead, etc., with or as with the hand. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. The extremity of the arm below the wrist, or something like or acting like it. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. Dexterity; touch; performance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. An operative. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. Handwriting; signature. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. A measure; four inches. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. Possession; control. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. Side; direction. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. The extremity of the human arm, consisting of the palm and fingers; a measure of four inches; side part, right or left; performance; workmanship; power of performance; skill; manner of acting or performance; agency; possession; power; the cards held at a game; an index, or that which performs the office of the hand or of a finger in pointing; a man employed in a workshop or on board ship; style of penmanship. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  62. To give with the hand; to lead; to conduct; to furl, as a sail. To hand down, to transmit in succession. At hand, near; not distant. In hand, present payment; in a state of execution. On hand, in present possession; under one's care or management. Off hand, without delay or difficulty; dexterously; without previous preparation. Out of hand, ready payment, with regard to the payer; at once; directly. To his hand, to my hand, &c., in readiness; already prepared. Under his hand, under her hand, &c., with the proper writing or signature of the name. Hand over head, negligently; rashly. Hand over hand, by passing the bands alternately one before or above another. Hand to hand, in close fight, in close union. Hand in hand, in union; conjointly. From hand to mouth, without provision beforehand. To join hand in hand, to unite efforts and act in concert. To live from hand to mouth, to obtain food and other necessaries as want requires. To bear in hand, to keep in expectation. To bear a hand, to hasten. To lend a hand, to give assistance. To be hand in glove, to be intimate and familiar. To set the hand to, or to take in hand, to undertake. To take one in hand, to lay hold of or deal with. To have a hand in, to be concerned in. Clean hands, a blameless life. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  63. The broad extremity of the arm below the wrist; side; part; act; discipline; restraint; power; agency; style of writing; a workman; cards held in a game. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  64. To give or transmit with the hand; to guide or lead by the hand; to manage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  65. Pert. to or used by the hand-much used as the first element of a compound word. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  66. A measure equal to a hand's breadth, -- four inches; a palm. Chiefly used in measuring the height of horses. mso.anu.edu.au
  67. Personal possession; ownership; hence, control; direction; management; -- usually in the plural. mso.anu.edu.au
  68. To furl; -- said of a sail. mso.anu.edu.au
  69. Called by Galen "the instrument of instruments." It is the symbol of human action ( Psalms 9:16 ; Job 9:30 ; Isaiah 1:15 ; 1 Timothy 2:8 ). Washing the hands was a symbol of innocence ( Psalms 26:6 ; 73:13 ; Matthew 27:24 ), also of sanctification ( 1 Corinthians 6:11 ; Isaiah 51:16 ; Psalms 24:3 Psalms 24:4 ). In Psalms 77:2 the correct rendering is, as in the Revised Version, "My hand was stretched out," etc., instead of, as in the Authorized Version, "My sore ran in the night," etc. The right hand denoted the south, and the left the north ( Job 23:9 ; 1 Samuel 23:19 ). To give the right hand was a pledge of fidelity ( 2 Kings 10:15 ; Ezra 10:19 ); also of submission to the victors ( Ezekiel 17:18 ; Jeremiah 50:15 ). The right hand was lifted up in taking an oath ( Genesis 14:22 , etc.). The hand is frequently mentioned, particularly the right hand, as a symbol of power and strength ( Psalms 60:5 ; Isaiah 28:2 ). To kiss the hand is an act of homage ( 1 Kings 19:18 ; Job 31:27 ), and to pour water on one's hands is to serve him ( 2 Kings 3:11 ). The hand of God is the symbol of his power: its being upon one denotes favour ( Ezra 7:6 Ezra 7:28 ; Isaiah 1:25 ; Luke 1:66 , etc.) or punishment ( Exodus 9:3 ; Judges 2:15 ; Acts 13:11 , etc.). A position at the right hand was regarded as the chief place of honour and power ( Psalms 45:9 ; 80:17 ; 110:1 ; Matthew 26:64 ). biblestudytools.com
  70. A measure of length equal tp four inches, used in measuring the height ofhorses. A person's signature. In old English law. An oath.For the meaning of the terms "strong hand" aud "clean hands," see those titles. thelawdictionary.org
  71. That part of the human body at the end of the arm. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  72. Formerly the hand was considered as the symbol of good faith, and some contracts derive their names from the fact that the hand was used in making them; as handsale, (q. v.) mandatum, (q. v.) which comes from ä manu datä. The hand is still used for various legal or forensic purposes. When a person is accused of a crime and he is arraigned, and he is asked to hold up his right hand; and when one is sworn as a witness, he is required to lay his right hand on the Bible, or to hold it up. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  73. Hand is also the name of a measure of length used in ascertaining the height of horses. It is four inches long. See Measure: Ell. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  74. In a figurative sense, by hand is understood a particular form of writing; as if B writes a good hand. Various kinds of hand have been used, as, the secretary hand, the Roman hand, the court hand, &c. Wills and contracts may be written in any of these, or any other which is intelligible. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  75. hand, n. the extremity of the arm below the wrist: that which does the duty of a hand by pointing, as the hand of a clock: the fore-foot of a horse: a measure of four inches: an agent or workman: (pl.) work-people in a factory: performance, agency, co-operation: power or manner of performing: skill: possession: style of handwriting, sign-manual: side: direction: the set of cards held by a single player at whist, &c.: a single round at a game.--v.t. to give with the hand: to lead or conduct: (naut.) to furl, as sails.--ns. HAND'-BAG, a bag for small articles, carried in the hand; HAND'-BALL, the sport of throwing and catching a ball; HAND'-BARR'OW, a barrow without a wheel, carried by men: HAND'-BAS'KET, a small portable basket; HAND'-BELL, a small bell held by the hand when rung, a table-bell; HAND'BILL, a pruning-hook used in the hand: a bill or loose sheet with some announcement; HAND'BOOK, a manual or book of reference: a guide-book for travellers; HAND'BREADTH, the breadth of a hand: a palm; HAND'-CART, a small cart drawn by hand.--adj. HAND'ED (Milt.), with hands joined: (Shak.) having a hand of a certain sort.--ns. HAND'ER; HAND'FAST, a firm grip, handle: a contract, esp. a betrothal.--adj. bound, espoused: tight-fisted.--adj. HAND'FASTED, betrothed.--n. HAND'FASTING, betrothal: a private or even probationary form of marriage.--adj. Hand'-foot'ed, having feet like hands, chiropod.--ns. HAND'FUL, as much as fills the hand: a small number or quantity:--pl. HAND'FULS; HAND'-GALL'OP, an easy gallop, in which the speed of the horse is restrained by the bridle-hand; HAND'-GLASS, a glass or small glazed frame used to protect plants: a small mirror; HAND'-GRENADE', a grenade to be thrown by the hand; HAND'GRIP, grasp, grip, close struggle; HAND'ICUFFS, HAND'YCUFFS, fighting hand to hand.--adj. HAND'LESS, awkward.--ns. HAND-LINE, a fishing-line worked by hand without a rod; HAND'-LIST, a list for easy reference; HAND'-LOOM, a weaver's loom worked by hand, as distinguished from a power-loom.--adj. HAND'-MADE, manufactured by hand, not by a machine.--ns. HAND'MAID, HAND'MAIDEN, a female servant; HAND'-MILL, a mill worked by hand for coffee, pepper, &c., a quern; HAND'-OR'GAN, a portable organ, played by means of a crank turned by the hand; HAND'-P[=A]'PER, a particular make of paper, early in use at the Record Office, with the water-mark of a hand pointing; HAND'-POST, a finger-post, guide; HAND'-PROM'ISE, a form of betrothal amongst the Irish peasantry; HAND'RAIL, a rail supported by balusters, as in staircases, to hold by.--adv. phrase, HAND'-RUN'NING, straight on, continuously.--ns. HAND'-SAW, a saw manageable by the hand--also the same as HERN'SHAW, in the proverb, 'not to know a hawk from a handsaw;' HAND'-SCREEN, a small screen used to protect the face from the heat of the fire or sun; HAND'-SCREW, an appliance for raising heavy weights, a jack; HAND'SPIKE, a bar used with the hand as a lever.--n.pl. HAND'STAVES (B.), probably javelins.--ns. HANDS'-TURN, a helping hand, aid; HAND'WORK, work done by hand, as distinguished from machinery; HAND'WRITING, the style of writing peculiar to each person: writing.--adj. HAND'-WROUGHT, made with the hands, not by machinery.--HAND AND [IN] GLOVE (with), on very intimate terms; HAND DOWN, to transmit in succession; HAND IN HAND, in union, conjointly; HAND OF GOD, a term used for unforeseen unpreventable accidents, as lightning, tempest, &c.; HAND OVER HAND, by passing the hands alternately one before or above the other; HAND OVER HEAD, rashly; HANDS DOWN, with ease; HANDS OFF! keep off! refrain from blows! HANDS UP, a bushranger's call to surrender; HAND TO HAND, at close quarters; HAND TO MOUTH, without thought for the future, precariously.--A BIRD IN THE HAND, any advantage at present held; A COOL HAND, a person not easily abashed; AT ANY HAND, IN ANY HAND (Shak.), at any rate, in any case; AT FIRST HAND, from the producer or seller, or from the first source direct; AT HAND, near in place or time; AT SECOND HAND, from an intermediate purchaser or source; BEAR A HAND, make haste to help; BEAR IN HAND (Shak.), to keep in expectation; BE HAND AND GLOVE, to be very intimate and familiar; BELIEVED ON ALL HANDS, generally believed; BLOODY, or RED, HAND, granted to baronets of Great Britain and Ireland in 1611; BY THE STRONG HAND, by force; CAP IN HAND, humbly; CHANGE HANDS, to pass from one owner to another; COME TO ONE'S HAND, to be easy to do; DEAD MAN'S HAND, HAND-OF-GLORY, a charm to discover hidden treasure, &c., made from a mandrake root, or the hand of a man who has been executed, holding a candle; FOR ONE'S OWN HAND, on one's own account; FROM GOOD HANDS, from a reliable source; GAIN THE UPPER HAND, to obtain the mastery; GET ONE'S HAND IN, to become familiar with.--HANDWRITING ON THE WALL, any sign foreshadowing disaster (from Dan. v. 5).--HAVE A HAND IN, to be concerned in; HAVE CLEAN HANDS, to be honest and incorruptible; HAVE FULL HANDS, to be fully occupied; HOLD HAND (Shak.), to compete successfully; HOLD IN HAND, to restrain; IN HAND, as present payment: in preparation: under control; KISS THE HAND, in token of submission; LAY HANDS ON, to seize; LAYING ON OF HANDS, the laying on of the hands of a bishop or presbyters in ordination; LEND A HAND, to give assistance; OFF-HAND, OUT OF HAND, at once, immediately, without premeditation; OFF ONE'S HANDS, no longer under one's responsible charge; OLD HAND, one experienced, as opposed to Young hand; ON ALL HANDS, on all sides; ON HAND, ready, available: in one's possession; ON ONE'S HANDS, under one's care or responsibility; POOR HAND, an unskilful one; SECOND-HAND, inferior, not new; SET THE HAND TO, to engage in, undertake; SHOW ONE'S HAND, to expose one's purpose to any one; STAND ONE'S HAND (slang), to pay for a drink to another; STRIKE HANDS, to make a contract; TAKE IN HAND, to undertake; TAKE OFF ONE'S HANDS, to relieve of something troublesome; TO ONE'S HAND, in readiness; UNDER ONE'S HAND, with one's proper signature attached; WASH ONE'S HANDS (of), to disclaim the responsibility for anything (Matt. xxvii. 24); WITH A HEAVY HAND, oppressively; WITH A HIGH HAND, without taking other people into consideration, audaciously. [A.S. hand; in all Teut. tongues, perh. rel. to Goth. hinthan, to seize.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  76. Manus. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  77. [Latin] The terminal segment of the upper extremity. Electric h., the h. used as an electrode by being applied directly to the surface undergoing electrization. H. electrode, an electrode to be held in the h. na
  78. See Wrist and Hand. na
  79. Terminal part of human arm beyond wrist; similar member of all four limbs of monkey; forefoot of quadruped; authority, disposal, as in the hh. of; agency, as by the hh. of; share in action. as have a h. in it; pledge of marriage, as give one\'s h. to; person who does something with his hh., as a picture by the same h., all hh., the whole crew, a good h. (skilful) at singlestick; person, source, from which thing comes, as (first, SECOND, h.: COOL h.; skill, as a h. for pastry; style of workmanship; turn, innings, at cricket, billiards, &c.; style of writing. as a legible h.; signature, as witness the h. of A. B.; h.-like thing, esp. pointer of clock or watch; fixed quantity of various commodities, e.g., bundle of tobacco leaves: a lineal measure of horse\'s height.=4 in.; (Cards) cards dealt to a player, player holding these, as first, third, h.; at h., close by, about to happen soon; by h., by manual labour; for one\'s own h., on one\'s own account: (live) from h. to mouth, improvidently; in h., held in the hand, at one\'s disposal, under control; off h., without preparation, then& there; on h., in one\'s possession; on one\'s hh., resting on one as a responsibility; on all hh., to, from, all quarters; on the one h., on the other h., (of contrasted points of view &c.); out of h., at once, extempore, (also) out of control; to h., within reach; to one\'s h., ready for one without exertion on one\'s own part; bear a h., take part in: come to h., turn up. be received: have a h., be concerned in (action): lay hh. on. touch, seize; take in h., undertake; change hh., (of property) pass from one person to another; clean hh., (fig.) innocence; with a heavy h., oppressively; with a high h., boldly, arrogantly: have, keep, one\'s h. in, be in practice; his h. is out. he is out of practice: (win) hh. down, easily; hh. off!, do not touch; hh. up! (direction to persons to hold up their hands as a sign of assent &c., or to preclude resistance): h. in h., with hh. mutually clasped: go h. in h. with, keep step with, lit. & fig.: h. over h., with each h. successively passing over the other, as in climbing rope, (fig.) with steady or rapid progress (in overtaking &c.); h. to h., (of conflict &c.) at close quarters: serve (person) h. & foot (assiduously); be h. in (or&) glove (intimate) with: h.-bag (small, for carrying about); h.-ball. ball for throwing with h., game played with this between two goals; h.-barrow (carried by h.); handbell, bell rung by h., esp. one of a set for musical performance; handbill, printed notice circulated by h.; handbook, short treatise, manual, guide-book; h.-canter, gentle canter; h.-cart (pushed or drawn by h.); handcuff v.t., secure with handcuffs (pair of metal rings joined by short chain, for securing prisoner\'s hh.); h.-gallop, easy gallop; h.-glass, magnifying glass held in h., small mirror with handle; handgrip, grasp, seizure with the h. (friendly or hostile); handhold, something for the hh. to grip on (in climbing &c.); h.-line, fishing-line worked without rod; h.-made, made by h. (esp. opp. to machine-made); handmaid (en), female servant (archaic, exc. fig.); h.-organ, portable barrel-organ with crank turned by h.; h.-rail, railing along edge of stairs &c.; handshake, shake of person\'s h. with one\'s own, as greeting; handspike, wooden lever shod with iron, used on shipboard& by artillery; handwriting, writing with the h., esp. of particular person. Hence (-)handed, handless, aa. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  80. Help (person) with the hand (into, out of, carriage &c.); (Naut.) take in (sail); deliver, transfer, by hand or otherwise (over to person, down to succeeding generations, on, up, &c.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  81. The terminal part of the forelimb in quadrupeds, especially when prehensile. The carpus, metacarpus, and phalanges with the accompanying ligaments, tendons, nerves, muscles, connective tissue, fat, skin, and nails [Old Eng.] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  82. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Icelandic, Gothic] The outer extremity of the human arm, consisting of the palm and fingers;—a limb of certain animals; —an index or pointer of a dial;—a measure of the hand’s breadth; four inches; a palm;—side; part; direction;—act; deed;—power of making or producing; influence; agency;—manner of execution; skill dexterity;—transmission; conveyance;—reach; state; of nearness possession; property;—ministry; service;—form or cast of writing; style in artistic work;—an agent; a workman; a sailor;—prepared state; readiness;—catch, or take;—rate; price;—check; control;—cards held in a game; a share in a game at cards. Cabinet Dictionary
  83. That member of the body which reaches from the wrist to the fingers end; measure of four inches; side, right or left; part, quarter; ready payment; rate, price; workmanship, power or act of manufacturing or making; act of receiving any thing ready to one’s hand; reach, nearness, as at hand, within reach, state of being in preparation; cards held at a game; that which is used in opposition to another; transmission, conveyance; possession, power; pressure of the bridle; method of government, discipline, restraint; influence, management; that which performs the office of a hand in pointing; agent, person employed; giver and receiver; a workman, a sailor; form or cast of writing; Hand over head, negligently, rashly; Hand to hand, close fight; Hand in hand, in union, conjointly; Hand to mouth, as want requires; To bear in hand, to keep in expectation, to elude; To be hand and glove, to be intimate and familiar. Complete Dictionary

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