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Definitions of handle

  1. To touch; to feel with the hand; to use or hold with the hand. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To manage in using, as a spade or a musket; to wield; often, to manage skillfully. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To accustom to the hand; to work upon, or take care of, with the hands. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To receive and transfer; to have pass through one's hands; hence, to buy and sell; as, a merchant handles a variety of goods, or a large stock. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To deal with; to make a business of. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To treat; to use, well or ill. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To manage; to control; to practice skill upon. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To use or manage in writing or speaking; to treat, as a theme, an argument, or an objection. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To touch or feel with the hand; manage; manipulate; discourse on; treat; buy, sell, or invest in. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To touch, hold, or use with the hand: to make familiar by frequent touching: to manage: to discuss: to practice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. To touch or use with the hand; manage; treat. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. To use the hands. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. interact in a certain way; "Do right by her"; "Treat him with caution, please"; "Handle the press reporters gently" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. hold and move repeatedly Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. To touch, to feel, or wield with the hand; to discourse on; to discuss; to use well or ill. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. To feel, use, or hold with the hand; to make familiar by frequent touching; to treat or discourse on; to treat or use well or ill. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. the appendage to an object that is designed to be held in order to use or move it; "he grabbed the hammer by the handle"; "it was an old briefcase but it still had a good grip" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. touch, lift, or hold with the hands; "Don't handle the merchandise" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. show and train; "The prize-winning poodle was handled by Mrs. Priscilla Prescott" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. That part of vessels, instruments, etc., which is held in the hand when used or moved, as the haft of a sword, the knob of a door, the bail of a kettle, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. That of which use is made; the instrument for effecting a purpose; a tool. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. That part of a tool, vessel, etc., grasped by the hand; an instrument to gain an end. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. That part of anything held in the hand: (fig.) that of which use is made: a tool. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. The part by which anything is held; something to take hold of. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. That part of an object intended to be grasped with the hand. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. That part of a vessel or instrument which is held in the hand when used; that of which use is made; a tool. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. That part of anything held in the hand when used; that of which use is made; the instr. by which a purpose is effected. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for handle?

Usage examples for handle

  1. But most people have more than they know how to handle no matter where they are!" – Together by Robert Herrick (1868-1938)
  2. A hand tried the handle turned it- a slow step entered. – Harvest by Mrs. Humphry Ward
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