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Definitions of harangue

  1. To address by an harangue. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To address by a noisy speech. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To address by harangue:-pr.p. haranguing; pa.p. harangued. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To address by a harangue. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  5. To deliver a loud, ranting speech. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To make a speech or to give an address to a large assembly. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  7. A speech addressed to a large public assembly; a popular oration; a loud address a multitude; in a bad sense, a noisy or pompous speech; declamation; ranting. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A noisy or pompous speech; ranting. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. A loud speech addressed to a multitude: a popular, pompous address. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. HARANGUER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. An oration; address. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. An oration; a vehement speech. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. A speech addressed to an assembly or an army, usually offhand and declamatory. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. A popular oration; a public address. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for harangue?

Usage examples for harangue

  1. She had not heard what the lad was saying to Isom, for the kitchen was large and the stove far away from the door, but she had the passing thought that there was a good deal of earnestness or passion in the harangue for a farm- hand to be laying on his early morning talk. – The Bondboy by George W. (George Washington) Ogden
  2. Villeroy commenced his harangue by an allusion to the current opinion, that Mendoza had arrived in France with a torch in his hand, to light the fires of civil war in that kingdom, as he had recently done in England. – Project Gutenberg History of The Netherlands, 1555-1623, Complete by John Lothrop Motley
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