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Definitions of heat

  1. To grow hot. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To make or become hot; excite. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To make hot; to communicate heat to, or cause to grow warm; as, to heat an oven or furnace, an iron, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To excite or make hot by action or emotion; to make feverish. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To excite ardor in; to rouse to action; to excite to excess; to inflame, as the passions. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To make hot; warm; excite with passion or desire; make feverish; animate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To make hot: to agitate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. To make hot. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9. To grow warm or hot by the action of fire or friction, etc., or the communication of heat; as, the iron or the water heats slowly. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To grow warm or hot by fermentation, or the development of heat by chemical action; as, green hay heats in a mow, and manure in the dunghill. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To become hot. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. To become hot:-pr.p. heating; pa.p. heated. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. arouse or excite feelings and passions; "The ostentatious way of living of the rich ignites the hatred of the poor"; "The refugees' fate stirred up compassion around the world"; "Wake old feelings of hatred" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. make hot or hotter; "heat the soup" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. gain heat or get hot; "The room heated up quickly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. To make hot; to make feverish; to agitate; to excite. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To make hot; to become warm; to warm with passion or desire; to excite. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. applies to nonhuman mammals: a state or period of heightened sexual arousal and activity Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. utility to warm a building; "the heating system wasn't working"; "they have radiant heating" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. the sensation caused by heat energy Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. a form of energy that is transferred by a difference in temperature Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. a preliminary race in which the winner advances to a more important race Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. A force in nature which is recognized in various effects, but especially in the phenomena of fusion and evaporation, and which, as manifested in fire, the sun's rays, mechanical action, chemical combination, etc., becomes directly known to us through the sense of feeling. In its nature heat is a mode if motion, being in general a form of molecular disturbance or vibration. It was formerly supposed to be a subtile, imponderable fluid, to which was given the name caloric. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The sensation caused by the force or influence of heat when excessive, or above that which is normal to the human body; the bodily feeling experienced on exposure to fire, the sun's rays, etc.; the reverse of cold. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. High temperature, as distinguished from low temperature, or cold; as, the heat of summer and the cold of winter; heat of the skin or body in fever, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Indication of high temperature; appearance, condition, or color of a body, as indicating its temperature; redness; high color; flush; degree of temperature to which something is heated, as indicated by appearance, condition, or otherwise. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A single complete operation of heating, as at a forge or in a furnace; as, to make a horseshoe in a certain number of heats. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A violent action unintermitted; a single effort; a single course in a race that consists of two or more courses; as, he won two heats out of three. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Utmost violence; rage; vehemence; as, the heat of battle or party. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Agitation of mind; inflammation or excitement; exasperation. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Animation, as in discourse; ardor; fervency. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Sexual excitement in animals. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A physical form of energy, due to vibration, or motion, of the molecules, or minute particles, of which a body is composed; the sensation produced by a hot body; high temperature; opposite to cold; as, the heat of summer; the state of being hot; effervescence or bubbling; agitation of sudden or violent passion; ardor; vehemence; redness or flush of the face; a course at a race; hot weather. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. That which excites the sensation of warmth: sensation of warmth: a warm temperature: the warmest period, as the heat of the day: indication of warmth, flush, redness: excitement: a single course in a race: animation. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. That which causes warmth; warmth; glow; excitement; one course in a race. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. A form of energy manifested by burning subastances; the state of being hot; intensity; vehemence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A single course of a race. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Heater. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. The sensation produced by a hot body; that in the body which causes the sensation; warm temperature; warmest time; the state of being once heated; a single effort, as in a race; flush in the face; animal excitement; almost violence; ardour; exasperation. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. The sensation experienced on approaching or touching a hot body; caloric; strong excitement or agitation; ardour; fervency; a single effort, as in a race; a course. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. A kind of energy manifested in various ways; the sensation of warmth produced by stimulation of special organs; the period of sexual desire. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  42. Heated; as, the iron though heat red-hot. Webster Dictionary DB

What are the misspellings for heat?

Usage examples for heat

  1. He that feareth not to be burned in the fire, how will he fear the heat of weather? – The Works of John Bunyan Volume 3 by John Bunyan
  2. She goes along to draw the heat to Manon." – Legacy by James H Schmitz
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