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Definitions of heave

  1. rise and move, as in waves or billows; "The army surged forward" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. bend out of shape, as under pressure or from heat; "The highway buckled during the heatwave" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. make an unsuccessful effort to vomit; strain to vomit Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. breathe noisily, as when one is exhausted; "The runners reached the finish line, panting heavily" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. nautical: to move or cause to move in a specified way, direction, or position; "The vessel hove into sight" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. throwing something heavy (with great effort); "he gave it a mighty heave"; "he was not good at heaving passes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the act of raising something; "he responded with a lift of his eyebrow"; "fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an involuntary spasm of ineffectual vomiting; "a bad case of the heaves" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the act of lifting something with great effort Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. (geology) a horizontal dislocation Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. an upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling); "the heaving of waves on a rough sea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. lift or elevate Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. utter a sound, as with obvious effort; "She heaved a deep sigh when she saw the list of things to do" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. throw with great effort Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. To raise or force from the breast; to utter with effort; as, to heave a sigh. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To cause to swell or rise, as the breast or bosom. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To rise and fall with alternate motions, as the lungs in heavy breathing, as waves in a heavy sea, as ships on the billows, as the earth when broken up by frost, etc.; to swell; to dilate; to expand; to distend; hence, to labor; to struggle. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To make an effort to vomit; to retch; to vomit. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. An effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To cause to move upward or onward by a lifting effort; to lift; to raise; to hoist; - often with up; as, the wave heaved the boat on land. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To throw; to cast; - obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; - mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To hoist or lift up; force from the breast, as a sigh; cause to swell; throw. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To be lifted up; swell; rise and fall alternately; struggle or toil; pant; vomit. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. An effort or exertion upwards; lift; the act of throwing; swell. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To lift up: to throw: to cause to swell: to force from the breast. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. To be raised: to rise and fall: to try to vomit:-pr.p. heaving; pa.t. and pa.p. heaved' or (naut.) hove. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. An effort upward: a throw: a swelling: an effort to vomit:-pl. a disease of horses characterized by difficult and laborious breathing. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. A lifting; swelling. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. Heaved or hove. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To be raised; rise and fall; pull. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. To lift; throw; utter, as a sign. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To raise with effort; throw with difficulty. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. To rise or swell up; pant; strain; labor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A heaving; throw; swell, as of waves. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. An effort upward; a rising swell or distention; a throw; an effort to vomit. To heave down, to throw or lay down on one side; to careen. To heare out, to throw out. To heave to, to bring the ship's head to the wind, and stop her motion. To heave in sight, to appear. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To lift up; to raise; to cause to swell; to force from the breast; to throw; to hoist. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To swell, distend, or dilate; to pant; to make an effort to vomit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To raise or force from the breast, as a sigh; to throw or cast with strong effort; to cause to swell; to pant; to rise with pain; to swell and fall; to have an inclination to vomit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. A rising or swell; exertion or effort upwards; in mining, the displacement of a vein or bed when thrown upwards by the intersection of another vein or fault. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. To cause to move upward or onward by a lifting effort; to lift; to raise; to hoist; -- often with up; as, the wave heaved the boat on land. mso.anu.edu.au
  46. To throw; to cast; -- obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log. mso.anu.edu.au
  47. To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; -- mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead. mso.anu.edu.au
  48. h[=e]v, v.t. to lift up: to throw upward: to draw in any direction, as by a windlass: to cause to swell: to force from the breast: (geol.) to move away or displace (a vein or stratum).--v.i. to be raised: to rise and fall: to try to vomit:--pr.p. heav'ing; pa.t. and pa.p. heaved or (naut.) h[=o]ve.--n. an effort upward: a throw: a swelling: an effort to vomit: broken wind in horses.--ns. HEAVE'-OFF'ERING, a voluntary Jewish offering lifted up before the Lord by the priest; HEAV'ER, one who, or that which, heaves; HEAVES, a disease in horses; HEAVE'-SHOUL'DER, the shoulder of an animal elevated in sacrifice; HEAV'ING, a rising: swell: (Shak.) panting.--HEAVE HO! an exclamation used by sailors in putting forth exertion, as in heaving the anchor; HEAVE IN SIGHT, to come into view; HEAVE TO, to bring a vessel to a stand-still, to make her lie to. [A.S. hebban, pa.t. hóf, pa.p. hafen; Ger. heben.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  49. (past& p.p. heaved or hove). Lift (heavy thing); (of vein or stratum) displace (another); utter (groan, sigh) with effort; (Naut. & colloq.) throw; (Naut.) haul up, haul, by rope; rise, swell up; rise with alternate falls, as waves; pant; retch; pull (at rope, &c.); h. down, turn (ship) over on one side for cleaning &c.; h. to, bring (ship), bring ship, to a standstill; h. in sight, become visible; h. ho (cry of sailors in heaving anchor up).[old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  50. Heaving; h. of the sea, force exerted by swell of sea on ship\'s course; horizontal displacement of vein or stratum; (pl.) disease of horses, broken wind. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  51. n. An upward motion; swell or distension, as of the breast, of the waves, and the like; an effort to raise up something, as the contents of the stomach, &c. Cabinet Dictionary
  52. Lift, exertion or effort upwards; rising of the breast; effort to vomit; struggle to rife. Complete Dictionary

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