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Definitions of herd

  1. cause to herd, drive, or crowd together; "We herded the children into a spare classroom" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. keep, move, or drive animals; "Who will be herding the cattle when the cowboy dies?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a group of cattle or sheep or other domestic mammals all of the same kind that are herded by humans Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a group of wild animals of one species that remain together: antelope or elephants or seals or whales or zebra Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a crowd especially of ordinary or undistinguished persons or things; "his brilliance raised him above the ruck"; "the children resembled a fairy herd" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. move together, like a herd Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. Haired. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A number of beasts assembled together; as, a herd of horses, oxen, cattle, camels, elephants, deer, or swine; a particular stock or family of cattle. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A crowd of low people; a rabble. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To unite or associate in a herd; to feed or run together, or in company; as, sheep herd on many hills. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To associate; to ally one's self with, or place one's self among, a group or company. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To act as a herdsman or a shepherd. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To form or put into a herd. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A herdsman. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. One who herds or assembles domestic animals; a herdsman; - much used in composition; as, a shepherd; a goatherd, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A collection of beasts or cattle feeding or driven together; crowd; a keeper of cattle. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To unite or associate, as beasts; crowd together. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. A number of beasts feeding together, and watched or tended: any collection of beasts, as distinguished from a flock: a company of people, in contempt: the rabble. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To run in herds. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To tend, as a herdsman. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. One who tends a herd. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. A collection of beasts; rabble. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To associate, as cattle. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To tend, as cattle. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To bring together; congregate; flock together. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A number of animals feeding together. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A crowd; rabble. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A collection of beasts feeding or driven together; a company of people, in contempt; a rabble; a keeper of cattle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To form into a herd; to tend. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To associate; to associate as beasts. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. A collection or assemblage, as cattle or beasts; the rabble; one employed to attend cattle. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. To unite or associate, as beasts; to form into a herd. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. One who herds or assembles domestic animals; a herdsman; -- much used in composition; as, a shepherd; a goatherd, and the like. mso.anu.edu.au
  34. Genesis 13:5 ; Deuteronomy 7:14 . (See CATTLE .) biblestudytools.com
  35. (a collection of cattle), Herdsmen. The herd was greatly regarded in both the patriarchal and the Mosaic period. The ox was the most precious stock next to horse and mule. The herd yielded the most esteemed sacrifice, ( Numbers 7:3 ; Psalms 69:31 ; Isaiah 66:3 ) also flesh meat, and milk, chiefly converted probably, into butter and cheese. ( 32:14 ; 2 Samuel 17:29 ) The agricultural and general usefulness of the ox in ploughing, threshing, and as a beast of burden, ( 1 Chronicles 12:40 ; Isaiah 46:1 ) made a slaughtering of him seem wasteful. Herdsmen, etc., in Egypt were a low, perhaps the lowest, caste; but of the abundance of cattle in Egypt, and of the care there bestowed on them, there is no doubt. ( Genesis 47:6 Genesis 47:17 ; Exodus 9:4 Exodus 9:20 ) So the plague of hail was sent to smite especially the cattle, ( Psalms 78:48 ) the firstborn of which also were smitten. ( Exodus 12:29 ) The Israelites departing stipulated for, ( Exodus 10:26 ) and took "much cattle" with them. ch. ( Exodus 12:38 ) Cattle formed thus one of the traditions of the Israelitish nation in its greatest period, and became almost a part of that greatness. The occupation of herdsman was honorable in early times. ( Genesis 47:6 ; 1 Samuel 11:5 ; 1 Chronicles 27:29 ; 28:1 ) Saul himself resumed it in the interval of his cares as king, also Doeg was certainly high in his confidence ( 1 Samuel 21:7 ) Pharaoh made some of Josephs brethren "rulers over his cattle." Davids herd-masters were among his chief officers of state. The prophet Amos at first followed this occupation. [E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary biblestudytools.com
  36. n. An indefinite number, more than a few, of cattle, sheep, horses, or otheranimals of the larger sorts, assembled and kept together as one drove and under onecare and management. Brim v. Jones, 13 Utah, 440, 45 Pac. 352. thelawdictionary.org
  37. h[.e]rd, n. a number of beasts feeding together, and watched or tended: any collection of beasts, as distinguished from a flock: a company of people, the rabble.--v.i. to run in herds.--v.t. to tend, as a herdsman.--ns. HERD, one who tends a herd; HERD'GROOM (Spens.), a shepherd-lad; HERDS'-GRASS, timothy-grass; HERDS'MAN, a man employed to herd or tend cattle-- (B.) HERD'MAN. [A.S. hirde, hierde; Ger. heerde, Sw. hjord.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  38. Company of animals, esp. cattle, feeding or travelling together; large number of people (contempt.), esp. the, the common, the vulgar, h.; h.-book, pedigree-book of cattle or pigs; herdsman, keeper of hh. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. Keeper of herds, herdsman, esp. w. word prefixed, as cowh., swineh. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  40. Go in a herd (together, with others; esp. fig. of persons); tend (sheep, cattle). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. n. [Anglo-Saxon, German, Gothic] A collection or assemblage;—a drove of cattle going to market; a number of beasts grazing in the field;—a company of men or people; a crowd; a rabble;—one who tends or drives cattle; a herdsman. Cabinet Dictionary
  42. A number of beasts together; a company of men, incontempt or detestation; it anciently signified a keeper of cattle, a sense still retained in composition, as goatherd. Complete Dictionary

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