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Definitions of high

  1. standing above others in quality or position; "people in high places"; "the high priest"; "eminent members of the community" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. used of the smell of game beginning to taint Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a high place; "they stood on high and observed the coutryside" or"he doesn't like heights" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a forward gear with a gear ratio giving high vehicle velocity for a given engine speed Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a lofty level or position or degree; "summer temperatures reached an all-time high" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a public secondary school usually including grades 9 through 12; "he goes to the neighborhood highschool" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a state of altered consciousness induced by alcohol or narcotics; "they took drugs to get a high on" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a state of sustained elation; "I'm on a permanent high these days" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. an air mass of higher than normal pressure; "the east coast benefits from a Bermuda high" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. at a great altitude; "he climbed high on the ladder" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. far up toward the source; "he lives high up the river" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. in a rich manner; "he lives high" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. slightly and pleasantly intoxicated from alcohol or a drug (especially marijuana) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. used of sounds and voices; high in pitch or frequency Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. happy and excited and energetic Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. a high place; "they stood on high and observed the coutryside"; "he doesn't like heights" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. (literal meanings) being at or having a relatively great or specific elevation or upward extension (sometimes used in combinations like `knee-high'); "a high mountain"; "high ceilings"; "high buildings"; "a high forehead"; "a high incline"; "a foot high" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. greater than normal in degree or intensity or amount; "a high temperature"; "a high price"; "the high point of his career"; "high risks"; "has high hopes"; "the river is high"; "he has a high opinion of himself" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. in or to a high position, amount, or degree; "prices have gone up far too high" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. To hie. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Elevated above any starting point of measurement, as a line, or surface; having altitude; lifted up; raised or extended in the direction of the zenith; lofty; tall; as, a high mountain, tower, tree; the sun is high. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Elevated in character or quality, whether moral or intellectual; preeminent; honorable; as, high aims, or motives. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Exalted in social standing or general estimation, or in rank, reputation, office, and the like; dignified; as, she was welcomed in the highest circles. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Of great strength, force, importance, and the like; strong; mighty; powerful; violent; sometimes, triumphant; victorious; majestic, etc.; as, a high wind; high passions. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Very abstract; difficult to comprehend or surmount; grand; noble. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Costly; dear in price; extravagant; as, to hold goods at a high price. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Possessing a characteristic quality in a supreme or superior degree; as, high (i. e., intense) heat; high (i. e., full or quite) noon; high (i. e., rich or spicy) seasoning; high (i. e., complete) pleasure; high (i. e., deep or vivid) color; high (i. e., extensive, thorough) scholarship, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Strong-scented; slightly tainted; as, epicures do not cook game before it is high. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. In a high manner; in a high place; to a great altitude; to a great degree; largely; in a superior manner; eminently; powerfully. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. An elevated place; a superior region; a height; the sky; heaven. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. People of rank or high station; as, high and low. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. The highest card dealt or drawn. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To rise; as, the sun higheth. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. Regarded as raised up or elevated; distinguished; remarkable; conspicuous; superior; - used indefinitely or relatively, and often in figurative senses, which are understood from the connection Webster Dictionary DB
  35. Arrogant; lofty; boastful; proud; ostentatious; - used in a bad sense. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. Acute or sharp; - opposed to grave or low; as, a high note. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. Made with a high position of some part of the tongue in relation to the palate, as (ve), (fd). See Guide to Pronunciation, 10, 11. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. Elevated in place; lofty; exalted in degree or quality; chief; head; honorable; noble; of large amount or quantity; strong; powerful; intense; tempestuous; full or complete; near to the wind; tainted; shrill; acute. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. To a great altitude; eminently; luxuriously. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  40. Elevated: lofty: tall: eminent in anything: exalted in rank: dignified: chief: noble: ostentatious: arrogant: proud: strong: powerful: angry: loud: violent: tempestuous: excellent: far advanced: difficult: dear: remote in time. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. Aloft; eminently. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. Lofty; eminent; chief; arrogant; strong; dear. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  43. Greatly elevated; lofty; chief; exalted; intense. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. In a high manner; to a great altitude; also, at a high rate; luxuriously. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. Elevated; lofty; tall; elevated in rank, condition, or office; exalted in character or excellence; difficult; boastful; ostentations; arrogant; loud; threatening or angry; violent; powerful; luxurious; strong; remote from the equator; intense; faradvanced; noble; honourable; possessed of supreme power; of great price; remote in past time; acute; sharp. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. Aloft; to a great altitude; eminently; greatly; powerfully. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. An elevated place. High and dry, applied to the situation of a vessel when aground above water-mark. High day, high noon, the time when the sun is in the meridian. On high, aloft. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. Of noble birth; illustrious; as, of high family. Webster Dictionary DB
  49. Far upwards; elevated; lofty; noble; honourable; violent; boastful; principal or chief; strong or powerful; dear in price; full or complete-applied to time; acute, as applied to music. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. Aloft; greatly; with deep thought. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  51. Having a more complex and more highly differentiated structure. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  52. Regarded as raised up or elevated; distinguished; remarkable; conspicuous; superior; -- used indefinitely or relatively, and often in figurative senses, which are understood from the connection mso.anu.edu.au
  53. Arrogant; lofty; boastful; proud; ostentatious; -- used in a bad sense. mso.anu.edu.au
  54. Acute or sharp; -- opposed to grave or low; as, a high note. mso.anu.edu.au
  55. Made with a high position of some part of the tongue in relation to the palate, as / /ve, / f/d. See Guide to Pronunciation, // 10, 11. mso.anu.edu.au
  56. This term, as used in variouscompound legal phrases, is sometimes merely an addition of dignity, not importing acomparison; but more generally it means exalted, either in rank or location, oroccupying a position of superiority, and in a few instances it implies superiority inrespect to importance, size, or frequency or publicity of use. c. g., "high seas," "highway."As to high "Bailiff," "Constable," "Crimes," "Justice," "Justiciar," "School," "Sea,""Sheriff," "Treason," and "Water-Mark," see those titles. thelawdictionary.org
  57. This word has various signifcations: 1. Principal or chief, as high constable, high sheriff. 2. Prominent, in a bad sense, as high treason. 3. Open, not confined, as high seas. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  58. h[=i], adj. elevated: lofty: tall: elevated relatively to something, as upward from a base, in position from the mouth of a river, &c.: eminent in anything: exalted in rank: dignified: chief: noble: ostentatious: arrogant: proud: strong, intensified: extreme in opinion: powerful: angry: loud: violent: tempestuous: shrill: excellent: far advanced: difficult: dear: remote in time: slightly tainted (of game, &c.).--adv. aloft: eminently: powerfully: profoundly: of flesh, on the point of beginning to decay.--ns. HIGH'-AD'MIRAL, a high or chief admiral of a fleet; HIGH'-AL'TAR, the principal altar in a church; HIGH'-BAIL'IFF, an officer who serves writs, &c., in certain franchises, exempt from the ordinary supervision of the sheriff; HIGH'-BIND'ER (U.S.), a rowdy, ruffian, blackmailer.--adjs. HIGH'-BLEST (Milt.), supremely blest or happy; HIGH'-BLOOD'ED, of noble lineage; HIGH'-BLOWN, swelled with wind: (Shak.) inflated, as with pride; HIGH'-BORN, of high or noble birth; HIGH'-BRED, of high or noble breed, training, or family.--ns. HIGH'-CHURCH, applied to a party within the Church of England, which exalts the authority of the Episcopate and the priesthood, the saving grace of sacraments, &c. (also adj.); HIGH'-CHURCH'ISM; HIGH'-CHURCH'MAN.--adj. HIGH'-COL'OURED, having a strong or glaring colour.--ns. HIGH'-COURT, a supreme court; HIGH'-CROSS, a market cross; HIGH'-DAY, a holiday or festival: (B.) broad daylight.--adj. befitting a festival.--v.t. HIGH'ER, to raise higher: to lift.--v.i. to ascend.--n. HIGH'-FAL[=U]'TIN, bombastic discourse.--adj. bombastic: pompous.--adj. HIGH'-FED, fed highly or luxuriously: pampered.--ns. HIGH'-FEED'ING; HIGH'-FLIER, a bird that flies high: one who runs into extravagance of opinion or action.--adjs. HIGH'-FLOWN, extravagant: elevated: turgid; HIGH'-FLY'ING, extravagant in conduct or opinion; HIGH'-GROWN (Shak.), covered with a high growth; HIGH'-HAND'ED, overbearing: violent: arbitrary.--n. HIGH'-HAND'EDNESS.--adjs. HIGH'-HEART'ED, with the heart full of courage; HIGH'-HEELED, wearing high heels--of shoes.--n. HIGH'-JINKS, boisterous play or jollity: an old Scotch pastime in which persons played various parts under penalty of a forfeit.--adj. HIGH'-KILT'ED, wearing the kilt or petticoat high: indecorous.--n. and adj. HIGH'LAND, a mountainous district, esp. in pl. that portion of Scotland lying north and west of a line drawn diagonally from Nairn to Dumbarton.--ns. HIGH'LANDER, HIGH'LANDMAN, an inhabitant of a mountainous region; HIGH'-LOW, a high shoe fastened with a leather thong in front.--adv. HIGH'LY.--n. HIGH'-MASS (see MASS).--adjs. HIGH'-METT'LED, high-spirited, courageous; HIGH'-MIND'ED, having a high, proud, or arrogant mind: having honourable pride: magnanimous.--n. HIGH'-MIND'EDNESS.--adjs. HIGH'MOST, highest; HIGH'-NECKED, of a dress, cut so as to cover the shoulders and neck.--n. HIGH'NESS, the state of being high: dignity of rank: a title of honour given to princes.--adj. HIGH'-PITCHED, high-strung: haughty.--n. HIGH'-PLACE (B.), an eminence on which idolatrous rites were performed by the Jews--hence the idols, &c., themselves.--adjs. HIGH'-PRESS'URE, applied to a steam-engine in which the steam is raised to a high temperature, so that the pressure may exceed that of the atmosphere; HIGH'-PRICED, costly.--ns. HIGH'-PRIEST (see PRIEST); HIGH'-PRIEST'ESS; HIGH'-PRIEST'HOOD.--adjs. HIGH'-PRIN'CIPLED, of high, noble, or strict principle; HIGH'-PROOF, proved to contain much alcohol: highly rectified; HIGH'-RAISED, raised aloft: elevated; HIGH'-REACH'ING, reaching upwards: ambitious.--n. HIGH'-ROAD, one of the public or chief roads: a road for general traffic.--adjs. HIGH'-SEA'SONED, made rich or piquant with spices or other seasoning; HIGH'-SIGHT'ED (Shak.), always looking upwards; HIGH'-SOULED, having a high or lofty soul or spirit; HIGH'-SOUND'ING, pompous: ostentatious; HIGH'-SPIR'ITED, having a high spirit or natural fire: bold: daring: irascible.--n. HIGH'-STEP'PER, a horse that lifts its feet high from the ground.--adjs. HIGH'-STEP'PING, having a proud or conceited carriage or walk; HIGH'-STOM'ACHED (Shak.), proud-spirited, lofty, obstinate; HIGH'-STRUNG, high-spirited: sensitive.--n. HIGHT (Milt.), obsolete form of height.--adj. HIGH'-TAST'ED, having a strong, piquant taste or relish.--n. HIGH'-TIDE (rare), a great festival.--adj. HIGH'-TONED, high in pitch: dignified.--ns. HIGH'-TOP (Shak.), a mast-head; HIGH'-TREA'SON, treason against the sovereign or state.--adj. HIGH'-VICED (Shak.), enormously wicked.--ns. HIGH'-WA'TER, the time at which the tide is highest: the greatest elevation of the tide; HIGH'-WA'TER-MARK, the highest line so reached; HIGH'WAY, a public road on which all have right to go: the main or usual way or course; HIGH'WAYMAN, a robber who attacks people on the public way.--adj. HIGH'-WROUGHT, wrought with exquisite skill: highly finished: agitated.--HIGH AND DRY, of a ship, up out of the water: disabled; HIGH AND LOW, rich and poor, people of every condition; HIGH AND MIGHTY, exalted: arrogant; HIGH CELEBRATION (see CELEBRATION); HIGH LIFE, the life of fashionable society: the people of this society; HIGH LIVING, over-indulgence in the pleasures of the table; HIGH SEAS, the open sea, including the whole extent of sea so far as it is not the exclusive property of any particular country; HIGH TABLE, the table in the dining-hall of a college where the dons sit; HIGH TEA, a tea with hot meat, &c., as opposed to a plain tea.--A HIGH HAND, OR ARM, might: power: audacity; A HIGH TIME, A HIGH OLD TIME (coll.), a time of special jollity or enthusiasm; BE HIGH TIME, to be fully time something was done that should have been done well before; BE ON ONE'S HIGH HORSE, to assume an attitude of fancied superiority: to be arrogant.--HIGHLAND COSTUME, the fillibeg or kilt, shoulder-plaid, sporran, &c.; HIGHLAND REGIMENTS, a number of regiments in the British army, wearing the Highland dress and feather-bonnet, or tartan trews and shakos.--IN HIGH FEATHER, in high spirits: happy; ON HIGH, in or to a height; ON THE HIGH ROPES (coll.), in an elated or highly excited mood; WITH A HIGH HAND, arrogantly. [A.S. héah; Goth. hauhs, Ice. hár, Ger. hoch.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  59. (n.), adv. Of great or specified upward extent, as a h. hill, one inch h.; situated far above ground, sea level, &c.; upper, inland, as H. Asia, H. Dutch, German; (of physical actions) extending to or from, performed at, a height, as h. jump, h. flying; of exalted rank; the Most H., God; of exalted quality, as h. art, h. minds; a h. (very favourable) opinion of; h. life, that of the upper classes; h. (luxurious) feeding; (of meat or game) slightly tainted; great, intense, extreme, as in h. favour, h. pressure, h. temperature; h. latitude (far from equator); expensive, as corn is h.; (of time) far advanced, as h. noon, it is h. time to go; (of sounds) acute in pitch, shrill; h. (angry) words; extreme in opinion, as a h. tory; h. (elated, hilarious) spirits; h. & dry, (of ship) out of the water, (fig.) out of the current of events; (of officers &c.) chief, as H. Admiral, Chancellor; with a h. HAND; on the h. HORSE; h. & low, (people) of all conditions; h. & mighty, arrogant; on the h. ropes, (colloq.) elated, disdainful, enraged; on h., in, to, heaven; from on h., from heaven or a high place; (adv.) far up, aloft; in, to, a h. degree; at a h. price; (of sounds) at, to, a h. pitch; play h., play for h. stakes, play card of h. value; run h., (of sea) have strong current with h. tide (also fig. of feelings); h. (chief) altar; h.-blower, horse that flaps nostrils noisily; h.-born, of noble birth; H. Church, n. & a., (party, principles) giving a h. place to authority of Episcopate and priesthood, saving grace of sacraments. &c.; H.-Churchman, holder of these principles; H. Court, supreme court (usu. =H. Court of Justice); h. day, festal day; h. falutin (g) a. & n. [etym. dub.], bombast (ic); h.-flown, extravagant, bombastic; h.-flyer, -flier, (fig.) ambitious person, one who has high-flown notions; h.-handed, overbearing, arbitrary; h. JINKS; highlands, mountainous or elevated country, esp. (Scotch pron. helants) N. part of Scotland; Highlander, inhabitant of (esp. the Scotch) highlands; h.-lows (archaic), bootsreach-ingoverankles; h. MASS; h.-minded, of morally lofty character; h.-mindedness, this quality; h.- pitched, (of sound) acute in pitch, (of roof &c.) steep, (fig.) of lofty character; h.-priest, chief priest, esp. of the Jews; h. road, main road; h. SEAS; h.-spirited, of lofty or courageous spirit; h.-stepper, horse that lifts its feet high in walking& trotting (also fig.); H. Street (often proper name of principal street in town, at Oxford usu. the H.); h.-strung, in h. state of vigour or sensitiveness; h. table (for the fellows of college, colloq. the h.): h. tea, tea at which meat is served; h. TIDE; h. TREASON; h. water, state of tide when water is highest, time when tide is at the full; (the king\'s) highway, public (esp. main) road, main route by land or water, (fig.) ordinary direct course (of action &c.); highwayman, man (usu. mounted, cf. FOOTpad) who robs passengers on highway. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. how is that for h.? (colloq. formula inviting admiration &c.). h.-minded, (also, archaic) proud, overweening, (Lord, I am not h.-m.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  61. adv. In a high manner; to a great altitude; eminently; profoundly; powerfully; greatly. Cabinet Dictionary
  62. n. An elevated place; superior region. Cabinet Dictionary
  63. A great way upwards, rising above; elevated in place, raised aloft; exalted in nature; elevated in rank or condition; exalted in sentiment; difficult, abstruse; boastful, ostentatious; arrogant, proud, lofty; noble, illustrious; violent, tempestuous, applied to the wind; tumultuous, turbulent, ungovernable; full, complete; strong tasted; at the most perfect state, in the meridian; far advanced into antiquity; dear, exorbitant in price; capital, great, opposed to little, as high treason. Complete Dictionary
  64. High place, elevation, superior region. Complete Dictionary

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