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Definitions of hop

  1. move quickly from one place to another Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an informal dance where popular music is played Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. informal: travel by means of an aircraft, bus, etc.; "She hopped a train to Chicago"; "He hopped rides all over the country" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. jump lightly Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. make a jump forward or upward Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. jump across; "He hopped the bush" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. make a quick trip esp. by air; "Hop the Pacific Ocean" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the act of hopping; jumping upward or forward (especially on one foot) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. twining perennials having cordate leaves and flowers arranged in conelike spikes; the dried flowers of this plant are used in brewing to add the characteristic bitter taste to beer Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. make a quick trip especially by air; "Hop the Pacific Ocean" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. To move by successive leaps, as toads do; to spring or jump on one foot; to skip, as birds do. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To walk lame; to limp; to halt. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To dance. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A leap on one leg, as of a boy; a leap, as of a toad; a jump; a spring. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A dance; esp., an informal dance of ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A climbing plant (Humulus Lupulus), having a long, twining, annual stalk. It is cultivated for its fruit (hops). Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The catkin or strobilaceous fruit of the hop, much used in brewing to give a bitter taste. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The fruit of the dog-rose. See Hip. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To impregnate with hops. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. To gather hops. [Perhaps only in the form Hopping, vb. n.] Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To leap over; add, or fill with, the bitter flowers of the hop vine; as, to hop beer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To proceed by short leaps on one leg; skip with both legs; limp. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. A jump on one leg; a dance; a plant, the flowers of which are used in brewing malt liquors. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Hopped. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Hopping. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. To leap on one leg: to spring: to walk lame: to limp:-pr.p. hopping; pa.t. and pa.p. hopped'. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. A leap on one leg: a jump: a spring. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. A plant with a long twining stalk, the bitter cones of which are much used in brewing and in medicine. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To mix with hops. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To gather hops:-pr.p. hopping; pa.t. and pa.p. hopped'. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. To leap over. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. A leap on one leg; short jump. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. Climbing plant with bitter flowers, used in brewing, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To jump on one leg; jump. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To move by short leaps, especially on one leg. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. The act of hopping; a dance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A perennial climbing herb with opposite lobed leaves and scaly fruit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The fruit of this plant. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A leap on one leg; a jump; a spring; a dance. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. A twining-stemmed plant, the ripened cones of which are used in brewing, and impart a bitter flavour to the liquor. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To leap or spring on one leg; to skip; to limp; to dance. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To pick hops. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To proceed by short leaps; to skip lightly; to walk lamely; to limp. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. A short leap or spring, as on one leg; a light leap. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. A climbing plant whose seeds or flowers give bitterness to beer and ale. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. Pert. to hops. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. hop, v.i. to leap on one leg: to spring: to walk lame: to limp:--pr.p. hop'ping; pa.t. and pa.p. hopped.--n. a leap on one leg: a jump: a spring: a dance, dancing-party.--ns. HOP'-O'-MY-THUMB, the diminutive hero of one of Madame D'Aulnoy's famous nursery tales--'le petit pouce,' not to be confounded with the English Tom Thumb; HOP'PER, one who hops: a shaking or conveying receiver, funnel, or trough in which something is placed to be passed or fed, as to a mill: a boat having a movable part in its bottom for emptying a dredging-machine: a vessel in which seed-corn is carried for sowing; HOP'PING, the act of one who hops or leaps on one leg; HOP'-SCOTCH, a game in which children hop over lines scotched or traced on the ground.--HOP, SKIP, AND JUMP, a leap on one leg, a skip, and a jump with both legs; HOP THE TWIG (slang), to escape one's creditors: to die. [A.S. hoppian, to dance; Ger. hüpfen.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. hop, n. a plant with a long twining stalk, the bitter cones of which are much used in brewing and in medicine.--v.t. to mix with hops.--v.i. to gather hops:--pr.p. hop'ping; pa.t. and pa.p. hopped.--ns. HOP'BIND (corrupted into Hopbine), the stalk of the hop; HOP'-FLEA, a small coleopterous insect, very destructive to hop plantations in spring; HOP'-FLY, a species of Aphis, or plant-louse, injurious to hop plantations; HOP'-OAST, a kiln for drying hops.--adj. HOPPED, impregnated with hops.--ns. HOP'PER, HOP'-PICK'ER, one who picks hops; a mechanical contrivance for stripping hops from the vines; HOP'PING, the act of gathering hops: the time of the hop harvest; HOP'-POCK'ET, a coarse sack for hops--as a measure, aboutcwt. of hops; HOP'-POLE, a slender pole supporting a hop-vine.--adj. HOP'PY, tasting of hops.--ns. HOP'-TREE, an American shrub, with bitter fruit, a poor substitute for hops; HOP'-VINE, the stock or stem of the hop; HOP'-YARD, a field where hops are grown. [Dut. hop; Ger. hopfen.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  49. Humulus lupulus-h. Pillow, see Humulus lupulus-h. Plant, Humulus lupulus. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  50. Climbing perennial plant, cultivated for the cones borne by the female; (pl.) ripe cones of this, used for giving bitter flavour to malt liquor &c.; h.-bind, -bine, climbing stem of h.; h.-fly, aphis destructive to hh.; h.garden, field for cultivation of hh.; h.-picker, labourer, machine, employed to pick hh.; h.-pillow (stuffed with hh., to produce sleep); h.-POCKET; h.-pole (on which h. plant is trained); (v.t.) flavour with, bear, hh.; (v.i.) gather hh. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  51. Spring (of person) on one foot, (of animals) with all feet at once; (trans.) h. over (ditch &c.); (slang) h. (the twig), depart suddenly, die; hop-o\'-my-thumb, dwarf, pigmy; hopscotch, child\'s game of hopping on one foot& with it pushing flat stone &c., over scotches (lines) marked on ground. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  52. Hopping; spring; (colloq.) dance; h., skip (or step), & jump, exercise consisting of these three movements in sequence. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  53. See Humulus. American pocket medical dictionary.
  54. See Humulus Lupulus, under Humulus. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  55. n. A leap on one leg; a skip; a jump; a spring;—a dance. Cabinet Dictionary
  56. n. [Dutch, German] A well-known climbing, bitter plant having a long, twining stalk—the aromatic flower-scales and fruit are largely used in brewing and in medicine. Cabinet Dictionary
  57. A jump, a light leap; a jump on one leg; a place where meaner people dance. Complete Dictionary
  58. A plant, the flowers of which are used in brewing. Complete Dictionary

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