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Definitions of hull

  1. United States diplomat who did the groundwork for creating the United Nations (1871-1955) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. remove the hulls from, as of fruit Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the frame or body of ship Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a large fishing port in northeastern England Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. United States naval officer who commanded the `Constitution' during the War of 1812 and won a series of brilliant victories against the British (1773-1843) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. persistent enlarged calyx at base of e.g. a strawberry or raspberry Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. dry outer covering of a fruit or seed or nut Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. remove the hulls from; "hull the berries" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. The outer covering of anything, particularly of a nut or of grain; the outer skin of a kernel; the husk. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The frame or body of a vessel, exclusive of her masts, yards, sails, and rigging. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To strip off or separate the hull or hulls of; to free from integument; as, to hull corn. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To pierce the hull of, as a ship, with a cannon ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To toss or drive on the water, like the hull of a ship without sails. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Outer covering, especially of grain or nuts; the body or frame of a vessel. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To peel off the husk of; strike or pierce (the hull of a vessel) with a shot. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. The husk or outer covering of anything. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To strip off the hull: to husk. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. The frame or body of a ship. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To pierce the hull (as with a cannon-ball). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To float or drive on the water, as a mere hull. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Husk or outer covering; body of a ship. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To deprive of the hull; to pierce the hull. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To free from the hull. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. The outer covering, as of a nut; husk. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. To strike or pierce the hull of. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. The body of a vessel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. The outer covering of anything, particularly of a nut or of grain; the frame or body of a ship. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To strip off the hull; to pierce the hull of a ship with a cannon-ball. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To float or drive on the water, like a mere hull. Hull down, said of a ship when her hull is concealed by the convexity of the sea. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. The outer covering of anything, as of a nut or grain. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. To husk or shell. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. The body of a ship. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. To pierce the body of a ship with shot. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. hul, n. the husk or outer covering of anything.--v.t. to strip off the hull: to husk. [A.S. hulu, a husk, as of corn--helan, to cover; Ger. hülle, a covering, hehlen, to cover.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. hul, n. the frame or body of a ship.--v.t. to pierce the hull (as with a cannon-ball).--v.i. to float or drive on the water, as a mere hull. [Same word as above, perh. modified in meaning by confusion with Dut. hol, a ship's hold, or with hulk.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. Outer covering of fruit, esp.pod of peas& beans; (fig.) covering; (v.t.) remove h. of. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. Frame of ship; h. down, far away, so that h. is invisible; (v.t.) strike (ship) in h. with cannon shot. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. [A.S.] (Naut.) The body of a ship, without masts, etc. To H., (1) to hit with shot; (2) to drift without rudder, sail, or oar. To strike H. to take in all sails, and lash the helm a-lee; called also To lie a-hull. Hull to, situation of a ship lying a-hull. Hull-down, said of a ship when only masts and sails are above the horizon. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  39. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Gothic] The outer covering of any thing, particularly of a nut or of grain; the husk;—the frame or body of a vessel. Cabinet Dictionary
  40. The husk or integument of anything, the outer covering; the body of a ship, the hulk. Complete Dictionary

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