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Definitions of indicative

  1. a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. The indicative mood. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. Indicatively. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. (usually followed by `of') pointing out or revealing clearly; "actions indicative of fear" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. relating to the mood of verbs that is used simple declarative statements; "indicative mood" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. Pointing out; bringing to notice; giving intimation or knowledge of something not visible or obvious. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Suggestive; representing the whole by a part, as a fleet by a ship, a forest by a tree, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Pointing out; as, cold hands are indicative of poor circulation of the blood; bringing to notice; naming that mood of the verb which affirms. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. Giving intimation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. Pointing out, as a sign or intimation. The indicative mood, the form of the verb that affirms, or denies, or interrogates, as regards matter of fact. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. Serving to show or make known; the form of the verb which simply affirms or denies. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for indicative

  1. In Virginia we boarded for some time in a family consisting of a widow and her four daughters, and I there witnessed a scene strongly indicative of the effect I have mentioned. – Domestic Manners of the Americans by Fanny Trollope
  2. Nose, mouth and chin were clean- cut and indicative of power, while his brow was broad and smooth, with a surface so serene that it might have belonged to a woman. – The Prince of Graustark by George Barr McCutcheon
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