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Definitions of insect

  1. has a nasty or unethical character undeserving of respect Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. small air-breathing arthropod Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a person who has a nasty or unethical character undeserving of respect Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. One of the Insecta; esp., one of the Hexapoda. See Insecta. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Any air-breathing arthropod, as a spider or scorpion. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Any small crustacean. In a wider sense, the word is often loosely applied to various small invertebrates. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Fig.: Any small, trivial, or contemptible person or thing. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Of or pertaining to an insect or insects. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Like an insect; small; mean; ephemeral. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Insects are a class, Insecta, of Arthropoda whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth, several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. They have lived on earth for about 350 million years, as compared with less than 2 million for man. While insects are often commercially valuable and useful as scavengers, many species are harmful, causing enormous losses in agriculture and storage. Three orders, HEMIPTERA, DIPTERA, and Siphonaptera, are of medical interest in that they cause disease in man and animal. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1) Medical Dictionary DB
  11. One of a numerous class of animals, the Insecta, having no skeletons, including bugs, bees, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. An invertebrate creature, with many legs, and usually with fully developed or rudimentary wings, the body of which is divided into segments comprising head, thorax, and abdomen; the term is loosely applied to legged terrestrial invertebrates of many kinds, whether segmented or not. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  13. A small animal, as a wasp or fly, with a body as if cut in the middle, or divided into sections: anything small or contemptible. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. Like an insect: small: mean. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. Small animal with six legs, and no internal skeleton. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. A small six legged animal, having the body divided into segments, as a bee, fly, wasp, or the like. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Loosely, any small invertebrate; bug. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. Pertaining to or like an insect; small; mean; contemptible. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. A small animal, being one of a class of articulated animals, with a body composed of three distinct parts, the head, the thorax, and the abdomen; anything small or contemptible. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. A small creeping or flying animal, such as the fly, bee, &c., whose body appears cut or almost divided into parts. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. in'sekt, n. a word loosely used for a small creature, as a wasp or fly, with a body as if cut in the middle, or divided into sections: (zool.) an arthropod, usually winged in adult life, breathing air by means of tracheæ, and having frequently a metamorphosis in the life-history.--adj. like an insect: small: mean.--ns. INSECT[=A]R'IUM, a place where a collection of living insects is kept; INSEC'TICIDE, act of killing insects.--adjs. INSEC'TIFORM, INSEC'TILE, having the nature of an insect.--ns. INSEC'TIFUGE, a substance which protects against insects; INSEC'TION, an incision; IN'SECT-NET, a light hand-net for catching insects; IN'SECT-POW'DER, a dry powder used for stupefying and killing fleas and other insects, an insecticide or insectifuge. [Fr.,--L. insectum, pa.p. of insec[=a]re--in, into, sec[=a]re, to cut.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  22. Small invertebrate animal, usu. with body divided into segments& several pairs of legs, esp. (Zool.) one with body divided into three regions (head, thorax, abdomen), six legs upon thorax, & (usu.) two or four wings; (fig.) insignificant person or creature; i. -powder (for killing or driving away ii.). Hence insectivora n. pl., insectivore n., insectivorous a. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  23. The common name for any of the class Insecta, of the phylum Arthropoda, such as flies, mosquitoes, and ticks. [Lat.] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  24. n. [Latin] An articulate animal that, in its mature state, has the body divided into three distinct parts, the head, the thorax, and the abdomen, has six legs, never more than four wings, and that breathes air through the body in tubes opening externally by spiracles;- ny thing small or contemptible. Cabinet Dictionary
  25. Infects are so called from a separation in the middle of their bodies, whereby they are cut into two parts, which are joined together by a small ligature, as we see in wasps and common flies ; any thing small or contemptible. Complete Dictionary

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