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Definitions of interfere

  1. get involved, usually so as to hinder or halt an action; "Why did the U.S. not intervene earlier in WW II?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. come between so as to be hindrance or obstacle; "Your talking interferes with my work!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. get involved, so as to alter or hinder an action, or through force or threat of force; "Why did the U.S. not intervene earlier in WW II?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. To come in collision; to be in opposition; to clash; as, interfering claims, or commands. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To enter into, or take a part in, the concerns of others; to intermeddle; to interpose. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To cover the same ground; to claim the same invention. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To strike one foot against the opposite foot or ankle in using the legs; - sometimes said of a human being, but usually of a horse; as, the horse interferes. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To act reciprocally, so as to augment, diminish, or otherwise affect one another; - said of waves, rays of light, heat, etc. See Interference, 2. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To enter into or meddle in the affairs of others; come into collision; injure the fetlock by striking it with the opposite hoof; ordinarily said of a horse. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To come in collision: to intermeddle: to interpose: to act reciprocally-said of waves, rays of light, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. INTERFERER, INTERFERENCE. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. Interference. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. To clash; interpose; meddle. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. To take part in the concerns of others; interpose; intervene; also, to conflict; clash. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. To interpose; to intermeddle; to come in collision; to act reciprocally, so as to modify the result; in a horse, to strike the hoof against the opposite fetlock, and injure the flesh. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. To interpose; to intermeddle; to take part in the business or concerns of others. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. To strike one foot against the opposite foot or ankle in using the legs; -- sometimes said of a human being, but usually of a horse; as, the horse interferes. mso.anu.edu.au
  18. To act reciprocally, so as to augment, diminish, or otherwise affect one another; -- said of waves, rays of light, heat, etc. See Interference, 2. mso.anu.edu.au
  19. in-t[.e]r-f[=e]r', v.i. to come in collision: to intermeddle: to interpose: to act reciprocally--said of waves, rays of light, &c.--ns. INTERFER'ENCE; INTERFER'ER.--adv. INTERFER'INGLY. [Through O. Fr., from L. inter, between, fer[=i]re, to strike.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  20. (Of things) come into collision or opposition (with); (of person) meddle (with or abs.), whence interfering a.; intervene, take part, (in); (Physics, of waves of light &c.) strike against each other; (of horse) knock one leg against another. Hence interference n. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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