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Definitions of intermission

  1. a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. The act or the state of intermitting; the state of being neglected or disused; disuse; discontinuance. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. Cessation for a time; an intervening period of time; an interval; a temporary pause; as, to labor without intermission; an intermission of ten minutes. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. The temporary cessation or subsidence of a fever; the space of time between the paroxysms of a disease. Intermission is an entire cessation, as distinguished from remission, or abatement of fever. Newage Dictionary DB
  5. The temporary cessation or subsidence of a fever; the space of time between the paroxysms of a disease. is an entire cessation, as distinguished from remission, or abatement of fever. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Interruption; short break. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. Act of intermitting: interval: pause. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. Cessation for a time; interval; pause; the temporary cessation or subsidence of a fever. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. Cessation for a time; pause; temporary interruption. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  10. Intermissive. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

Usage examples for intermission

  1. At intermission I said, " How about a drink, John? – The Holes and John Smith by Edward W. Ludwig
  2. And, indeed, there is an intermission of the pulse, that is of a far longer continuance as that with which Lancisi says he had been troubled " for the space of six years"; yet if this intermission should be, as it was in him, " from a consent with the hypochondria," it may be entirely and perfectly taken away, by perfectly restoring those parts. – Psychotherapy by James J. Walsh
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