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Definitions of interrogation

  1. The act of interrogating or questioning; examination by questions; inquiry. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. A question put; an inquiry. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. A point, mark, or sign, thus [?], indicating that the sentence with which it is connected is a question. It is used to express doubt, or to mark a query. Called also interrogation point. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.
  5. The act of asking questions; a question; inquiry; a mark denoting a question. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. Act of questioning; question; mark (?) denoting a question. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. Interregative. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. A questioning; query. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. An interrogation point (?). The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. The act of interrogating; a question put; a note that marks a question, thus (?). Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. Examination by questions asked; a question put; a mark, thus (?), to indicate that a question is asked. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for interrogation

  1. Interrogation seems indeed the proper style of majesty incensed. – The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 2 by Edward Young
  2. It was impossible to fence the interrogation it had to be answered, one way or the other. – The Mystery of the Four Fingers by Fred M. White
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