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Definitions of jaw

  1. To scold; to clamor. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. chew the fat; shoot the breeze Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. chew (food); "He jawed his bubble gum"; "Chew your food and don't swallow it!"; "The cows were masticating the grass" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the part of the skull of a vertebrate that frames the mouth and holds the teeth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the bones of the skull that frame the mouth and serve to open it; the bones that hold the teeth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. talk socially without exchanging too much information; "the men were sitting in the cafe and shooting the breeze" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. One of the bones, usually bearing teeth, which form the framework of the mouth. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Hence, also, the bone itself with the teeth and covering. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. In the plural, the mouth. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Fig.: Anything resembling the jaw of an animal in form or action; esp., pl., the mouth or way of entrance; as, the jaws of a pass; the jaws of darkness; the jaws of death. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A notch or opening. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A notched or forked part, adapted for holding an object in place; as, the jaw of a railway-car pedestal. See Axle guard. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. One of a pair of opposing parts which are movable towards or from each other, for grasping or crushing anything between them, as, the jaws of a vise, or the jaws of a stone-crushing machine. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. The inner end of a boom or gaff, hollowed in a half circle so as to move freely on a mast. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Impudent or abusive talk. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Either of the bones of the mouth in which the teeth are placed; mouth maw. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. The bones of the mouth in which the teeth are set: the mouth: anything like a jaw. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. Bone in which the teeth are set; mouth; cheek; anything like a jaw. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. One of the bones of the mouth in which the teeth are set; also such bone with its attachments. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. Anything like or suggesting such an organ, as one of the gripping parts of a vise; often used figuratively; as, the jaws of death. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. The bones of the mouth in which the teeth are fixed; the mouth; anything like the jaw; the inner end of a boom or gaff. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  22. A structure of vertebrates supported by bone or cartilage, naked or sheathed in horn, or bearing teeth or horny plates, forming part of the mouth, and helping to open or shut it; in invertebrates, a similarly placed structure. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.

What are the misspellings for jaw?

Usage examples for jaw

  1. The forehead was low, the lips heavy, the jaw firm. – The Other Fellow by F. Hopkinson Smith
  2. The light shook in his hands, and his jaw fell as he looked at me. – The Red Cockade by Stanley J. Weyman
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