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Definitions of job

  1. the principal activity in your life that you do to earn money; "he's not in my line of business" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a crime (especially a robbery); "the gang pulled off a bank job in St. Louis" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a specific piece of work required to be done as a duty or for a specific fee; "estimates of the city's loss on that job ranged as high as a million dollars"; "the job of repairing the engine took several hours"; "the endless task of classifying the samples"; "the farmer's morning chores" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. a damaging piece of work; "dry rot did the job of destroying the barn"; "the barber did a real job on my hair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the performance of a piece of work; "she did an outstanding job as Ophelia"; "he gave it up as a bad job" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the responsibility to do something; "it is their job to print the truth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. an object worked on; a result produced by working; "he held the job in his left hand and worked on it with his right" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a book in the Old Testament containing Job's pleas to God about his afflictions and God's reply Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. any long-suffering person who withstands affliction without despairing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a state of difficulty that needs to be resolved; "she and her husband are having problems"; "it is always a job to contact him"; "urban problems such as traffic congestion and smog" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. invest at a risk; "I bought this house not because I want to live in it but to sell it later at a good price, so I am speculating" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a workplace; as in the expression "on the job"; Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. (computer science) a program application that may consist of several steps but is a single logical unit Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. a Jewish hero in the Old Testament who maintained his faith in God in spite of afflictions that tested him Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. work occasionally; "As a student I jobbed during the semester breaks" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. arranged for contracted work to be done by others Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. profit privately from public office and official business Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. A sudden thrust or stab; a jab. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A piece of chance or occasional work; any definite work undertaken in gross for a fixed price; as, he did the job for a thousand dollars. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A public transaction done for private profit; something performed ostensibly as a part of official duty, but really for private gain; a corrupt official business. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Any affair or event which affects one, whether fortunately or unfortunately. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A situation or opportunity of work; as, he lost his job. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To strike or stab with a pointed instrument. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To thrust in, as a pointed instrument. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To do or cause to be done by separate portions or lots; to sublet (work); as, to job a contract. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To buy and sell, as a broker; to purchase of importers or manufacturers for the purpose of selling to retailers; as, to job goods. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To hire or let by the job or for a period of service; as, to job a carriage. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To do chance work for hire; to work by the piece; to do petty work. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To seek private gain under pretense of public service; to turn public matters to private advantage. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To carry on the business of a jobber in merchandise or stocks. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. The hero of the book of that name in the Old Testament; the typical patient man. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A piece of work, especially of an occasional kind; colloquially, a position; any event or circumstance; as, it is a bad job. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To let out for hire; buy up (goods) and retail (them). The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. Buy and sell, as a stockbroker; do an occasional piece of work for wages. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. A sudden stroke or stab with a pointed instrument like a beak. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. To strike or stab suddenly:-pr.p. jobbing; pa.p. jobbed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. Any piece of work, esp. of a trifling or temporary nature: any undertaking with a view to profit: a mean transaction, in which private gain is sought under pretence of public service. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. To work at jobs: to buy and sell, as a broker: to hire or let out for a short time, esp. horses. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. A piece of work. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To work at jobs; buy and sell, as a broker. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To buy, sell, work, etc., by the job. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. A piece of work done as a whole. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A corrupt money making scheme. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. A piece of work, specially of a temporary nature; anything to be done, whether of more or less importance; an undertaking professedly for the public good, but really for one's own. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. A sudden stab with a pointed instrument. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. To let out, as work for execution, or horses for hire; to hire; to buy up and retail. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. To strike or stab with a sharp instrument. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. To buy and sell as a broker; to do job-work or jobbing; to hire or let; to act in the public service for one's own ends. To do the job for one, to kill him. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. A certain amount of work; a piece of work undertaken at a stated price; a disreputable transaction or undertaking for profit, effected by one secretly, under the guise of public zeal, or under the shadow of official power. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. To buy and sell, as a broker; to work at chance employment; to hire out or let, as horses. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  51. he that weeps or cries biblestudytools.com
  52. the patriarch, from whom one of the books of the Old Testament is named. His residence in the land of Uz marks him as belonging to a branch of the Aramean race, which had settled in the lower part of Mesopatamia (Probably to the south or southeast of Palestine, in Idumean Arabia), adjacent to the Sabeans and Chaldeans. The opinions of Job and his friends are thus peculiarly interesting as exhibiting an aspect of the patriarchal religion outside of the family of Abraham, and as yet uninfluenced by the legislation of Moses. The form of worship belongs essentially to the early patriarchal type; with little of ceremonial ritual, without a separate priesthood, it is thoroughly domestic in form and spirit. Job is represented as a chieftain of immense wealth and high rank, blameless in all the relations of life. What we know of his history is given in the book that bears his name. biblestudytools.com
  53. persecuted, an Arabian patriarch who resided in the land of Uz (q.v.). While living in the midst of great prosperity, he was suddenly overwhelmed by a series of sore trials that fell upon him. Amid all his sufferings he maintained his integrity. Once more God visited him with the rich tokens of his goodness and even greater prosperity than he had enjoyed before. He survived the period of trial for one hundred and forty years, and died in a good old age, an example to succeeding generations of integrity ( Ezekiel 14:14 Ezekiel 14:20 ) and of submissive patience under the sorest calamities ( James 5:11 ). His history, so far as it is known, is recorded in his book. biblestudytools.com
  54. (persecuted ), the third son of Issachar, ( Genesis 46:13 ) called in another genealogy JASHUB. ( 1 Chronicles 7:1 ) biblestudytools.com
  55. job, n. a sudden stroke or stab with a pointed instrument like a beak.--v.t. to strike or stab suddenly:--pr.p. job'bing; pa.p. jobbed. [Gael. gob, W. gwp, a bird's beak; conn. with gobble, job.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  56. job, n. any piece of work, esp. of a trifling or temporary nature: miscellaneous printing-work: any undertaking with a view to profit: a mean transaction, in which private gain is sought under pretence of public service.--adj. of a particular job or transaction, assigned to a special use: bought or sold lumped together.--v.i. to work at jobs: to buy and sell as a broker: to hire or let out by the week or month, esp. horses.--ns. JOB'BER, one who jobs: one who buys and sells, as a broker or middleman: one who turns official actions to private advantage: one who engages in a mean lucrative affair; JOB'BERY, jobbing: unfair means employed to procure some private end; JOB'-MAS'TER, a livery-stable keeper who jobs out horses and carriages.--A BAD JOB, an unfortunate affair; ODD JOBS, occasional pieces of work. [Formerly gob--O. Fr. gob, a mouthful; from the same Celtic root as gobble.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  57. j[=o]b, n. a monument of patience--from Job in Scripture.--n. JOB[=A]'TION, a tedious scolding.--JOB'S COMFORTER, one who aggravates the distress of an unfortunate man he has come to comfort; JOB'S NEWS, bad news; JOB'S POST, the bearer of bad news. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  58. Piece of work, esp. one done for hire or profit; transaction in which duty is sacrificed to private advantage; anything one has to do; do person\'s j., ruin him; bad j., thing on which labour is wasted, failure; good, bad, j. (state of affairs); j. lot, lot of goods bought as speculation; jobmaster, one who lets out horses& carriages by the j.; j.-work, done& paid for by the j. [?] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. Do jobs; hire (horse, carriage) for definite time or job, let out on hire thus; buy& sell (stock, goods) as broker; deal in stocks; turn position of trust to private advantage; deal corruptly with (matter), whence jobbery (4) n. Hence jobber n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. Prod, stab slightly; hurt (horse) with bit; (intr.) thrust at (thing); (n.) prod, thrust, jerk at bit. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  61. Patriarch whose story forms Book of J. in O.T.; J.\'s comforter, one who under guise of comforter aggravates distress. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  62. A low, mean, lucrative affair; petty, piddling work, a piece of chance work; a sudden stab with a sharp instrument Complete Dictionary

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