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Definitions of keel

  1. one of the main longitudinal beams (or plates) of the hull of a vessel; can extend vertically into the water to provide lateral stability Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the median ridge on the breastbone of birds that fly Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. walk as if unable to control one's movements; "The drunken man staggered into the room" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. To cool; to skim or stir. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A brewer's cooling vat; a keelfat. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A longitudinal timber, or series of timbers scarfed together, extending from stem to stern along the bottom of a vessel. It is the principal timber of the vessel, and, by means of the ribs attached on each side, supports the vessel's frame. In an iron vessel, a combination of plates supplies the place of the keel of a wooden ship. See Illust. of Keelson. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Fig.: The whole ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A barge or lighter, used on the Type for carrying coal from Newcastle; also, a barge load of coal, twenty-one tons, four cwt. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The two lowest petals of the corolla of a papilionaceous flower, united and inclosing the stamens and pistil; a carina. See Carina. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A projecting ridge along the middle of a flat or curved surface. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To traverse with a keel; to navigate. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To turn up the keel; to show the bottom. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. In a dirigible, a construction similar in form and use to a ship's keel; in an aeroplane, a fin or fixed surface employed to increase stability and to hold the machine to its course. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. The chief and lowest timber or steel plate of a vessel, extending from stem to stern and supporting the whole frame; hence, a ship; in an airship, the lowest and central part of the body of the machine; a broad, flat vessel used on the Maine coast. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To furnish with a keel. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To turn up the keel; turn over. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. The part of a ship extending along the bottom from stem to stern, and supporting the whole frame: a low flat-bottomed boat: (bot.)the lowest petals of the corolla of a papilionaceous flower. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. To plough with a keel, to navigate: to turn keel upwards. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. Bottom timber of a ship, running the whole length. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. To put a keel on. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. To turn up the keel; as, to keel over. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. The lowest lengthwise member of the framework of a vessel, forming a projecting ridge along the bottom from stem to stern. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. The principal timber in a ship, extending from stem to stern at the bottom, and supporting the whole frame; a low, flat-bottomed vessel; the lowest petal of a papilionaceous corolla. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To plough with a keel; to navigate; to turn up the keel; to show the bottom. False keel, a strong piece of timber bolted under the main keel of a vessel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. The principal and lowest timber in a ship, extending from stem to stern, and supporting the whole frame; a low flat-bottomed vessel; in bot., a projecting ridge, rising along the middle of a flat or curved surface; the two lowermost, and more or less combined, petals of a papilionaceous corolla. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. To navigate; to turn keel upwards. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. The carina or breast-bone of flying birds; the boat-shaped structure formed by the two anterior petals of the Leguminosae. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  28. [Anglo-Saxon] The carina or breast-bone of flying birds; boat-shaped structure formed by two anterior petals of Leguminosae; ridge on blade or on other parts or grasses. na
  29. k[=e]l, n. the part of a ship extending along the bottom from stem to stern, and supporting the whole frame: a low flat-bottomed boat: a Tyne coal-barge: a ship generally: (bot.) the lowest petals of the corolla of a papilionaceous flower.--v.t. or v.i. to plough with a keel, to navigate: to turn keel upwards.--n. KEEL'AGE, dues for a keel or ship in port.--adj. KEELED (bot.) keel-shaped: having a prominence on the back.--ns. KEEL'ER, KEEL'MAN, one who works on a barge.--v.t. KEEL'HAUL, to punish by hauling under the keel of a ship by ropes from the one side to the other: to treat a subordinate in a galling manner. [A.S. ceól, a ship; Ger. and Dut. kiel; prob. confused with Ice. kiölr, a keel.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  30. k[=e]l, v.t. (Shak.) to cool. [A.S. célan, to chill.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  31. k[=e]l, n. (Scot.) red chalk, ruddle.--v.t. to mark with ruddle. [Prob. Gael. cil, ruddle.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  32. Lowest longitudinal timber of vessel, on which framework of the whole is built up; combination of iron plates serving same purpose in iron vessel; (poet.) ship; falsek. (attached to bottom of true k. to protect it); k.- blocks (on which k. rests in building &c.); keelhaul, haul (person) under k. as punishment; (v.t.) turn (ship) k. upwards, k. over, upset, capsize, (person &c.). Hence keelless a. [old Norse] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  33. Flat-bottomed vessel, esp. of kind used on Tyne &c. for loading colliers; amount carried by this. [Dutch] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  34. [A.S.] (Naut.) A low and flat-bottomed Tyne boat for carrying coals to colliers. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  35. [A.S.] (Naut.) The principal timber quasi-backbone of a ship. To give the K., to careen. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  36. See Tread of a ship . Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  37. n. [Anglo-Saxon, German] The principal timber in a ship, extending from stem to stern at the bottom ,and supporting the whole frame ; hence, a ship ; - a low, flat, flat-bottomed vessel, used in the river Tyne to convey coals from Newcastle for loading the colliers ; - a broad, flat vessel used for cooling liquids ; a keeler. Cabinet Dictionary

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