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Definitions of knob

  1. To grow into knobs or bunches; to become knobbed. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. a rounded projection or protuberance Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. A hard protuberance; a hard swelling or rising; a bunch; a lump; as, a knob in the flesh, or on a bone. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. A knoblike ornament or handle; as, the knob of a lock, door, or drawer. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A rounded hill or mountain; as, the Pilot Knob. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. See Knop. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The rounded handle of a door, etc.; round swelling, mass, or lump; a rounded hill. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. A hard protuberance: a hard swelling: a round ball. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. KNOBBINESS. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. A protuberance; ball. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. A round projection; a rounded handle, as of a door. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. A hard protuberance; a hard swelling; a bunch; a boss; a knoll; a round ball at the end of a thing. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. A ball or lump at the end of anything; a hard protuberance. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. Knobbed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. Knobby. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for knob?

Usage examples for knob

  1. Slipping one hand behind him, he tried the knob of the door; but, as he had expected, the door held fast. – Lefty Locke Pitcher-Manager by Burt L. Standish
  2. As she turned to go back to the dining- room, a little more uneasy than when she came in, her eye fell on that picture which Blair had left, a small oasis in the desert of Nannie's parlor, and with her hand on the door- knob she paused to look at it. – The Iron Woman by Margaret Deland
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