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Definitions of knot

  1. To form knots or joints, as in plants; to knit knots or fringe. See Knit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To tie in a knot; form knots or joints, as in plants; gather in a knot. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To tie in or with, or form into, a knot or knots; to form a knot on, as a rope; to entangle. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To unite closely; to knit together. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To entangle or perplex; to puzzle. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To tie in a knot; unite firmly or closely. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To tie in a knot: to unite closely. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. To tie in a knot. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9. To form knots or joints, as in a cord, a plant, etc.; to become entangled. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To knit knots for fringe or trimming. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To copulate; - said of toads. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. From knots or joints; make knots for fringe. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. To form knots or joints: to knit knots for a fringe:-pr.p. knotting; pa.t. and pa. p. knotted. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. tie or fasten into a knot Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. tangle or complicate; "a ravelled story" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. To complicate or tie in a knot; to entangle; to perplex; to unite closely. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To tie; to unite; to form knots or joints. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. Knotting. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. something twisted and tight and swollen; "their muscles stood out in knots"; "the old man's fists were two great gnarls"; "his stomach was in knots" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. any of various fastenings formed by looping and tying a rope (or cord) upon itself or to another rope or to another object Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. a tight cluster of people or things; "a small knot of women listened to his sermon" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. a hard cross-grained round piece of wood in a board where a branch emerged; "the saw buckled when it hit a knot" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. a sandpiper that breeds in the arctic and winters in the southern hemisphere Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. tie or fasten into a knot; "knot the shoelaces" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. make into knots; make knots out of; "She knotted der fingers" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. A fastening together of the pars or ends of one or more threads, cords, ropes, etc., by any one of various ways of tying or entangling. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A lump or loop formed in a thread, cord, rope. etc., as at the end, by tying or interweaving it upon itself. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. An ornamental tie, as of a ribbon. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A bond of union; a connection; a tie. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Something not easily solved; an intricacy; a difficulty; a perplexity; a problem. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A figure the lines of which are interlaced or intricately interwoven, as in embroidery, gardening, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A cluster of persons or things; a collection; a group; a hand; a clique; as, a knot of politicians. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A portion of a branch of a tree that forms a mass of woody fiber running at an angle with the grain of the main stock and making a hard place in the timber. A loose knot is generally the remains of a dead branch of a tree covered by later woody growth. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A protuberant joint in a plant. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. The point on which the action of a story depends; the gist of a matter. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. A division of the log line, serving to measure the rate of the vessel's motion. Each knot on the line bears the same proportion to a mile that thirty seconds do to an hour. The number of knots which run off from the reel in half a minute, therefore, shows the number of miles the vessel sails in an hour. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. A nautical mile, or 6080.27 feet; as, when a ship goes eight miles an hour, her speed is said to be eight knots. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A kind of epaulet. See Shoulder knot. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A sandpiper (Tringa canutus), found in the northern parts of all the continents, in summer. It is grayish or ashy above, with the rump and upper tail coverts white, barred with dusky. The lower parts are pale brown, with the flanks and under tail coverts white. When fat it is prized by epicures. Called also dunne. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. An interweaving or tying of thread or cord, etc.; anything resembling a knot; entanglement; difficulty; a hard part in a piece of wood; part of a tree where the branches shoot out; a nautical mile or 2,025 yards; bond of union; group; the red-breasted sandpiper. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  41. A wading bird much resembling a snipe, said in Drayton's Polyolbion to be named from king Canute, with whom it was a favorite article of food. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. Anything confusedly fastened or twisted, as threads, etc.: a figure the lines of which are interlaced: a bond of union: a difficulty: a cluster: the part of a tree where a branch shoots out: an epaulet: pad for supporting burdens carried on the head: (naut.) a division of the log-line, a mile. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. KNOTTINESS. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. A tie; joint of a plant; insertion of a branch. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. Knotted, knotty. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. A fastening of a rope, cord, or the like, by intertwining. See illus. on preceding page. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. An ornamental bow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. A gnarled portion of a tree - trunk, where a branch has grown out; a joint in a stem, as of grass. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. A nautical mile. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. The complication of a thread or cord, made by tying or interlacing; hard part of wood due to the fibres interlacing; a nodule; a figure, the lines of which frequently interlace each other; difficulty; intricacy; something not easily solved; a bond of association or union; a cluster; a collection; a group, as of persons; a protuberant joint of a plant; a division of the log-line, serving to measure the rate of a vessel's motion, the number of knots which run off from the reel in half a minute showing the number of miles the vessel sails in an hour; a nautical mile, 6080 ft.; an epaulette. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. A wading bird of the snipe kind. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. A tie; an interweaving or uniting of thread, cord, or rope at one point; any bond of union; a dark hard part in wood; a collection; a group; a small band; a difficulty; something so intricate as not easily to be solved; among seamen, a division of the log-line, so called from the line being divided into equal parts of 50 ft. by pieces of string rove through the strands; the rate at which a ship sails at sea, the rate and distance being measured by the knots run out in half a minute-thus nine knots run out in half a minute denote sailing at the rate of nine nautical miles per hour; a nautical mile; in bot., a swelling in some stems where the attachment of the leaves takes place. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. In wood, the base of a branch surrounded by new layers of wood and hardened by pressure; in nuclear-meshwork, the small particles of chromatin where the meshes cross. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.

What are the misspellings for knot?

Usage examples for knot

  1. Some day, Dick, I'll lose my temper, tie Penfield in a hard knot and throw him into the river! – Empire Builders by Francis Lynde
  2. " Let me go first," said Hall, pushing me aside as I caught the first knot above my head. – The Moon Metal by Garrett P. Serviss
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