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Definitions of labour

  1. concluding state of pregnancy; from the onset of labor to the birth of a child; "she was in labor for six hours" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. work hard; "She was digging away at her math homework"; "Lexicographers drudge all day long" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. productive work (especially physical work done for wages); "his labor did not require a great deal of skill" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a social class comprising those who do manual labor or work for wages; "there is a shortage of skilled labor in this field" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a political party formed in Great Britain in 1900; characterized by the promotion of labor's interests and the socialization of key industries Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. exert oneself, make an effort to reach a goal; "She tugged for years to make a decent living"; "We have to push a little to make the deadline!"; "She is driving away at her doctoral thesis" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. undergo the efforts of childbirth Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. strive and make an effort to reach a goal; "She tugged for years to make a decent living"; "We have to push a little to make the deadline!"; "She is driving away at her doctoral thesis" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. Laborer, labourer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. Toilsome exertion of either body or mind, specially in one's calling or occupation; toil; work, or its fruit; the pangs of childbirth; trial. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To work at; to till; to till with effort; to form or fabricate with exertion. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. To exert muscular strength; to toil; to work hard; to exert one's powers of body or mind in the prosecution of any design; to be hard pressed; to be burdened; to pitch and roll in a heavy sea; to suffer the pangs of childbirth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. Exertion, bodily or mental, producing fatigue; toil; effort; the pangs and efforts of child-birth. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. To work at; to exert one's powers of body or mind; to toil; to strive; to pitch and roll, as a ship; to struggle. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. Same as labor; British spelling. dictgcide_fs
  16. l[=a]'bur, n. toil or exertion, esp. when fatiguing: work: pains: duties: a task requiring hard work: the pangs of childbirth.--v.i. to undergo labour: to work: to take pains: to be oppressed: to move slowly: to be in travail: (naut.) to pitch and roll heavily.--adj. LAB[=O]'RIOUS, full of labour: toilsome: wearisome: devoted to labour: industrious.--adv. LAB[=O]'RIOUSLY.--n. LAB[=O]'RIOUSNESS.--adj. L[=A]'BOURED, bearing marks of labour or effort in the execution.--ns. L[=A]'BOURER, one who labours: one who does work requiring little skill; L[=A]'BOURIST, one who contends for the interests of workmen.--adjs. L[=A]'BOUR-SAV'ING, intended to supersede or lessen the labour of men; L[=A]'BOURSOME (Shak.), made with labour and diligence.--LABOUR DAY, a legal holiday in some parts of the United States, as in New York (the first Monday in September); LABOUR MARKET, the supply of unemployed labour in relation to the demand for it; LABOUR OF LOVE, work undertaken merely as an act of friendliness, and without hope of emolument; LABOUR WITH, to take pains to convince.--HARD LABOUR, compulsory work imposed on certain criminals in addition to imprisonment. [O. Fr. labour, labeur--L. labor.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  17. Bodily or mental toil, exertion, (Hard l.; lost l., fruitless efforts); toil tending to supply wants of community, body of those who contribute by toil to production, labourers, (opp. capital); task (i. of Hercules, Herculean l., one needing enormous strength &c.); pains of childbirth, travail, (in l.); l.-market, supply of unemployed l. with reference to demand on it. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  18. Use l., exert oneself, work hard; strive for end or to do; advance with difficulty (wheels I. in the sand); be troubled (her labouring heart) or impeded, suffer under mistake &c.; (of ship) roll or pitch heavily; (archaic or poet.) till (ground); elaborate, work out in detail, treat at length, (i will not I. the point; laboured, much elaborated, showing signs of l., not spontaneous); labouring man, labourer. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  19. (Also, often L-) the working classes as a political force (L. Party, esp. representatives of Latin in Parliament). Latin Exchange, any of a number of State-organized offices distributed throughout the U.K. for the purpose of directing labour to the quarters in which it is wanted: l. of love, work that one likes doing or would undertake without pay or compulsion. Labourite., member, adherent, of Latin Party. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  20. See labor. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  21. n. [Latin] Physical toil or bodily exertion, especially when fatiguing, irksome, or unavoidable;— intellectual exertion; mental effort;— work; undertaking; especially hard or difficult work;— travail; the pains of childbirth;— the action of a ship in a heavy sea;— pl. Heroic achievements;— the trials and sufferings of life. Cabinet Dictionary

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