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Definitions of lampoon

  1. To subject to abusive ridicule expressed in writing; to make the subject of a lampoon. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To abuse or ridicule in a written article. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To assail with personal satire: to satirize:- pr.p. lampooning; pa.p. lampooned. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To assail with personal satire. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To abuse or satirize. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. ridicule with satire; "The writer satirized the politician's proposal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. To abuse with personal satire; to satirize. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. To assail with personal satire; to satirise. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. a composition that imitates somebody's style in a humorous way Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. An article, essay, etc., written to hold a person up to ridicule and contempt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. A personal satire in writing: low censure. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. A personal satire. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. A personal satire in writing. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.

Usage examples for lampoon

  1. And have you seen your latest lampoon Mr. Garrick? – Richard Carvel, Complete by Winston Churchill Last Updated: March 5, 2009
  2. More interesting to read would doubtless be a lampoon said to reflect on everything sacred to Scotland, and burnt accordingly, which was called Caledonia; or, the Pedlar turned Merchant. – Books Condemned to be Burnt by James Anson Farrer
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