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Definitions of land

  1. the people who live in a nation or country; "a statement that sums up the nation's mood"; "the news was announced to the nation"; "the whole country worshipped him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. extensive landed property (especially in the country) retained by the owner for his own use; "the family owned a large estate on Long Island" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a politically organized body of people under a single government; "the state has elected a new president"; "African nations"; "students who had come to the nation's capitol"; "the country's largest manufacturer"; "an industrialized land" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. bring into a different state; "this may land you in jail" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. territory over which rule or control is exercised; "his domain extended into Europe"; "he made it the law of the land" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. United States inventor who incorporated Polaroid film into lenses and invented the one-step photographic process (1909-1991) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. working the land as an occupation or way of life; "farming is a strenuous life"; "there's no work on the land any more" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. material in the top layer of the surface of the earth in which plants can grow (especially with reference to its quality or use); "the land had never been plowed"; "good agricultural soil" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a domain in which something is dominant; "the untroubled kingdom of reason"; "a land of make-believe"; "the rise of the realm of cotton in the south" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. deliver, as of a blow; "He landed several blows on his opponent's head" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. reach or come to rest; "The bird landed on the highest branch"; "The plane landed in Istanbul" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. relating to or characteristic of or occurring on land; "land vehicles" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. operating or living or growing on land Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. the territory occupied by a nation; "he returned to the land of his birth"; "he visited several European countries" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. the land on which real estate is located; "he built the house on land leased from the city" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. cause to come to the ground; "the pilot managed to land the airplane safely" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. shoot at and force to come down; "the enemy landed several of our aircraft" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. arrive on shore; "The ship landed in Pearl Harbor" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. bring ashore; "The drug smugglers landed the heroin on the beach of the island" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. deliver (a blow); "He landed several blows on his opponent's head" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. The softer inorganic matter composing part of the surface of the globe, in distinction from the firm rock; soil of all kinds, including gravel, clay, loam, and the like; sometimes, soil favorable to the growth of plants; the visible surface of the globe; the ground; as, loose earth; rich earth. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Any portion, large or small, of the surface of the earth, considered by itself, or as belonging to an individual or a people, as a country, estate, farm, or tract. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Ground, in respect to its nature or quality; soil; as, wet land; good or bad land. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The inhabitants of a nation or people. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The mainland, in distinction from islands. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The ground or floor. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The ground left unplowed between furrows; any one of several portions into which a field is divided for convenience in plowing. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Any ground, soil, or earth whatsoever, as meadows, pastures, woods, etc., and everything annexed to it, whether by nature, as trees, water, etc., or by the hand of man, as buildings, fences, etc.; real estate. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. In any surface prepared with indentations, perforations, or grooves, that part of the surface which is not so treated, as the level part of a millstone between the furrows, or the surface of the bore of a rifled gun between the grooves. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To set or put on shore from a ship or other water craft; to disembark; to debark. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To catch and bring to shore; to capture; as, to land a fish. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To set down after conveying; to cause to fall, alight, or reach; to bring to the end of a course; as, he landed the quoit near the stake; to be thrown from a horse and landed in the mud; to land one in difficulties or mistakes. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To go on shore from a ship or boat; to disembark; to come to the end of a course. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To set on shore. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. The solid part of the surface of the earth; - opposed to water as constituting a part of such surface, especially to oceans and seas; as, to sight land after a long voyage. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. The lap of the strakes in a clinker-built boat; the lap of plates in an iron vessel; - called also landing. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. The solid portion of the surface of the globe; a country or district; ground or soil, with reference to its use; as, farm-land; real estate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. To set on shore; as, to land passengers from a ship; capture and bring to shore; as, to land a flsh; win; as, to land a prize; put down after carrying; as, the train landed him at his destination. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. To come or go on shore; to arrive at a dock, as a vessel; disembark; get down from, out of, or off from. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  40. Earth, the solid portion of the surface of the globe: a country: a district: soil: real estate: a nation or people. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. To set on land or on shore. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. To come on land or on shore. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. Earth; solid ground; a region; soil; real estate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. To come on land. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To set on land. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. To bring to the land; debark; go or come ashore. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. The solid surface of the earth; a continent; ground or soil; real estate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Earth; the solid portion of the surface of the globe, or any portion of it; a country or district; ground; soil; real estate; a nation or people. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. To go on shore; to arrive. To make the land, to discover land from the sea as the ship approaches it. To shut in the land, to lose sight of the land left, by the intervention of a point or promontory. To set the land, to see by the compass how it bears from the ship. Land o' the Leal, the place of the loyal or faithful; heaven. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. Urine. See Lant. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. The dry solid portion of the earth; a district, region, or country; soil; earth; ground which any one possesses. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. To set on shore from a vessel; to go on shore from a ship; to disembark. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. in the most general sense, comprehends any ground, soil, or earth whatsoever; as meadows, pastures, woods, moors, waters, marshes, furzes, and heath. Co. Litt 4a. The word “land” includes not only the soil, but everything attached to it, whether attached by the course of nature, as trees, herbage, and water, or by the hand of man, as buildings and fences. Mott v. Palmer, 1 N. Y. 572; Nessler v. Neher, 18 Neb. 649, 26 N. W. 471; Higgins Fuel Co. v. Snow, 113 Fed. 433, 51 C. C. A. 267; Lightfoot v. Grove, 5 Heisk. (Tenn.) 477; Johnson v. Richardson, 33 Miss. 464; Mitchell v. Warner, 5 Conn. 517; Myers v. League, 62 Fed. 659, 10 C. C. A. 571. 2 Bl. Comm. 16, 17. Land is the solid material of the earth, whatever may be the ingredients of which it is composed, whether soil, rock, or other substance. Civ. Code Cal. thelawdictionary.org
  54. The solid part of the surface of the earth; -- opposed to water as constituting a part of such surface, especially to oceans and seas; as, to sight land after a long voyage. mso.anu.edu.au
  55. The lap of the strakes in a clinker-built boat; the lap of plates in an iron vessel; -- called also landing. mso.anu.edu.au
  56. The solid part of the surface of the earth; opposed to water as constituting a part of such surface, especially to oceans and seas; as, to sight land after a long voyage. dictgcide_fs
  57. The lap of the strakes in a clinker-built boat; the lap of plates in an iron vessel; called also landing. dictgcide_fs
  58. To pilot (an airplane) from the air onto the land; as, to land the plane on a highway. dictgcide_fs
  59. To come to the end of a course; to arrive at a destination, literally or figuratively; as, he landed in trouble; after hithchiking for a week, he landed in Los Angeles. dictgcide_fs
  60. To go on shore from a ship or boat; to disembark. dictgcide_fs
  61. To reach and come to rest on land after having been in the air; as, the arrow landed in a flower bed; the golf ball landed in a sand trap; our airplane landed in Washington. dictgcide_fs
  62. land, n. earth, the solid portion of the surface of the globe: a country: a district: soil: real estate: a nation or people: (Scot.) a group of dwellings or tenements under one roof and having a common entry.--v.t. to set on land or on shore.--v.i. to come on land or on shore.--ns. LAND'-[=A]'GENT, a person employed by the owner of an estate to let farms, collect rents, &c.; LAND'-BREEZE, a breeze setting from the land towards the sea; LAND'-CRAB, a family of crabs which live much or chiefly on land.--v.t. LAND'DAMN (Shak.), to banish from the land.--adj. LAND'ED, possessing land or estates: consisting in land or real estate.--ns. LAND'ER, one who lands; LAND'FALL, a landslip: an approach to land after a voyage, also the land so approached; LAND'-FISH (Shak.), a fish on land, any one acting contrary to his usual character; LAND'-FLOOD, a flooding or overflowing of land by water: inundation; LAND'FORCE, a military force serving on land, as distinguished from a naval force; LAND'-GRAB'BER, one who acquires land by harsh and grasping means: one who is eager to occupy land from which others have been evicted; LAND'-GRAB'BING, the act of the land-grabber; LAND'-HERD, a herd of animals which feed on land; LAND'-HOLD'ER, a holder or proprietor of land; LAND'-HUNG'ER, greed for the acquisition of land; LAND'ING, act of going on land from a vessel: a place for getting on shore: the level part of a staircase between the flights of steps.--adj. relating to the unloading of a vessel's cargo.--ns. LAND'ING-NET, a kind of scoop-net for landing a fish that has been caught; LAND'ING-PLACE, a place for landing, as from a vessel; LAND'ING-STAGE, a platform for landing passengers or goods carried by water, often rising and falling with the tide; LAND'-JOB'BER, a speculator in land; LAND'-JOB'BING; LAND'LADY, a woman who has property in land or houses: the mistress of an inn or lodging-house.--adj. LAND'LESS (Shak.), without land or property.--v.t. LAND'LOCK, to enclose by land.---adj. LAND'-LOCKED, almost shut in by land, protected by surrounding masses of land from the force of wind and waves.--ns. LAND'LORD, the owner of land or houses: the master of an inn or lodging-house; LAND'LORDISM, the authority or united action of the landholding class; LAND'-LUBB'ER, a landsman (a term used by sailors); LAND'MARK, anything serving to mark the boundaries of land: any object on land that serves as a guide to seamen: any distinguishing characteristic; LAND'-MEAS'URE, a system of square measure used in the measurement of land; LAND'-MEAS'URING, the art of estimating the superficial content of portions of land; LAND'-OWN'ER, one who owns land; LAND'-OWN'ERSHIP.--adj. LAND'-OWN'ING.--ns. LAND'-P[=I]'LOT, (Milt.), a guide on land; LAND'-P[=I]'RATE, a highway robber: a fellow who makes a practice of swindling sailors in port; LAND'RAIL, the crake or corncrake, so named from its cry; LAND'-RAK'ER (Shak.), a vagabond; LAND'-REEVE, the assistant to the land-steward of a great estate; LAND'-ROLL, a clod-crusher; LAND'-SCRIP (U.S.), negotiable government certificate entitling to possession of certain public land by individuals or corporate bodies; LAND'-SHARK, a land-grabber: one who plunders sailors on shore; LAND'SKIP (same as LANDSCAPE); LAND'SLIDE, LAND'SLIP, a portion of land that falls down, generally from the side of a hill, usually due to the undermining effect of water; LANDS'MAN, LAND'MAN, one who lives or serves on land: one inexperienced in seafaring; LAND'-SPRING, water lying near the surface, easily drawn upon by shallow wells; LAND'-STEW'ARD, a person who manages a landed estate; LAND'-SURVEY'ING (see SURVEYING); LAND'-TAX, a tax upon land; LAND'-TURN, a land-breeze; LAND'-WAIT'ER, a custom-house officer who attends on the landing of goods from ships.--adv. LAND'WARD, toward the land.--adj. lying toward the land, away from the sea-coast: situated in or forming part of the country, as opposed to the town: rural.--n. LAND'WIND, a wind blowing off the land.--LAND LEAGUE, an association founded in Ireland by Michael Davitt in 1879, and organised by C. S. Parnell, to procure reduction and rearrangement of rents, and to promote the substitution of peasant-proprietors for landlords--condemned as an illegal conspiracy in 1881; LANDED INTEREST, the combined interest of the land-holding class in a community.--MAKE THE LAND, to discover the land as the ship approaches it; SET THE LAND, to observe by the compass how the shore bears from the ship. [A.S. land; Dut., Ger. land.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  63. Solid part of earth\'s surface (opp. sea, water; how the I. lies, what is the state of affairs); ground, soil, expanse of country; country, nation, state, (I. of promise, Canaan; I. of Cake s; l. of the leal, heaven; I. of the living, present life); landed property, (pl.) estates; strip of plough or pasture land parted from others by water furrows. L.-agent, -ncy, steward (ship) of estate, agent, agency, for sale &c. of estates; l.-bank, issuing notes on security of landed property; I. -breeze, blowing seaward from l.; I. -carriage, transport by l.; l. -crab, kinds that live on l. but breed in sea; landfall (naut.), approach to land esp. for first time on voyage (good, bad, landfall, according, not according, to calculation); l.-force (s), military, not naval; I. -grabber, (esp.) man who takes Irish farm after eviction of tenant; landholder, proprietor or (usu.) tenant of l.; l.-hunger, -gry, eager (ness) to acquire l.; l.-jobber, speculator in l.; landlady, woman keeping inn, boarding-house, or lodgings, also woman having tenants; l.-law (usu. pi.), law (s) of landed property; Latin League, Irish association 1879-81 for reducing rents, introducing peasant proprietorship, &c; l.-locked, almost or quite enclosed by l.; landlord, person of whom another holds any tenement (opp. tenant), keeper of inn, lodgings, &c.; l.-lubber (naut.), person ignorant of the sea& ships; landmark, object marking boundary of country, estate, &c, conspicuous object in district &c, object or event or change marking stage in process or turning point in history; landowner, owner of l.; landrail, corncrake; l.-service, military; l.-shark, one who lives by preying on seamen ashore; l.-sick (naut.; of ship), impeded in movement by nearness of l.; l.-slide (United States), overwhelming political defeat; landslip, sliding down of mass of land on cliff or mountain; landsman, non-sailor; l.-swell, roll of water near shore; I. -tax, assessed on landed property; I. -tie, rod, beam, or piece of masonry, securing or supporting wall &c. by connecting some part of it with the ground; l.-wind,=l. -breeze. Hence landless a., landward a. & adv., landward adv. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  64. Set or go ashore (p.p. =having come ashore, see -ED (2), esp. in comb, as newly landed), disembark; set down from vehicle; bring to, reach or find oneself in, a certain place, stage, or position; deal (person blow &c; landed him one in the eye); bring (fish) to l., (fig.) win (prize &c.); (trans, of jockey, intr. of horse) bring or come in (first &c., or abs. =first); alight after jump &c. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  65. n. [Anglo-Saxon] Earth, or the solid matter which constitutes the fixed part of the surface of the globe;— any portion of the solid surface of Lancet-window, the globe, considered as set apart or belonging to an individual or a people;— ground; soil, or the earth in respect to its nature or quality;— the inhabitants of a country or region;— the main land in distinction from an adjacent island;— the ground or floor;— any earth whatsoever; real estate. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for land?

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