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Definitions of leap

  1. a light springing movement upwards or forwards Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an abrupt transition; "a successful leap from college to the major leagues" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a sudden and decisive increase; "a jump in attendance" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. pass abruptly from one state or topic to another; "leap into fame"; "jump to a conclusion" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. cause to jump or leap, as of a trained animal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the distance leaped (or to be leaped); "a leap of 10 feet" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. cause to jump or leap; "the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. A basket. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. A weel or wicker trap for fish. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To spring clear of the ground, with the feet; to jump; to vault; as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To spring or move suddenly, as by a jump or by jumps; to bound; to move swiftly. Also Fig. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To pass over by a leap or jump; as, to leap a wall, or a ditch. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To copulate with (a female beast); to cover. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To cause to leap; as, to leap a horse across a ditch. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The act of leaping, or the space passed by leaping; a jump; a spring; a bound. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Copulation with, or coverture of, a female beast. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A fault. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A passing from one note to another by an interval, especially by a long one, or by one including several other and intermediate intervals. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To pass over by a bound or jump; as, to leap a ditch; to cause to jump or spring over; as, to leap a horse over a hedge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. To jump or spring; as, to leap from a wall; to vault; to bound suddenly; as, my heart leaps up. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. The act of passing over with a bound; a jump; a spring; the space passed over in jumping. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Leaper. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Leaped, leapt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Leaping. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. To move with springs or bounds: to spring upward or forward: to jump: to rush with vehemence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. To spring or bound over:-pr.p. leaping; pa.t. leaped or leapt (lept); pa.p. leaped, rarely leapt. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. Act of leaping: bound: space passed by leaping: sudden transition. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Act of leaping; space leaped over. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. Leaped or leapt (lept). The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To spring; jump; rush forward. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To spring over or off the ground; jump; bound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. The act of leaping; a jump; bound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. A jump; a bound; space passed by leaping; copulation of animals; an abrupt transition. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. To spring or bound over; to cause to leap. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. To spring upward or forward; to jump; to rault; to rush with force. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. To spring or rise from the ground; to jump; to pass over with a spring or bound. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  38. A jump; a spring; a bound; space passed by leaping. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  39. l[=e]p, v.i. to move with bounds: to spring upward or forward: to jump: to rush with vehemence.--v.t. to bound over: to cause to take a leap: to cover or copulate (of some beasts):--pr.p. leap'ing; pa.t. leaped or leapt (lept); pa.p. leaped, rarely leapt.--n. act of leaping: bound: space passed by leaping: sudden transition.--ns. LEAP'-FROG, a play in which one boy places his hands on the back of another stooping in front of him, and vaults over his head; LEAP'ING-HOUSE (Shak.), a brothel; LEAP'ING-TIME (Shak.), youth; LEAP'-YEAR, every fourth year--of 366 days, adding one day in February.--LEAP IN THE DARK, an act of which we cannot foresee the consequences. [A.S. hleápan, pa.t. hleóp; Ger. laufen, to run.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. l[=e]p, n. a basket: a wicker net. [A.S. leáp.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  41. (F.) Saut; Bound, Jump,-the act of leaping. Muscular movement or movements, by which the body is detached from the soil by the forcible and sudden extension of the lower limbs, previously flexed upon the pelvis. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  42. (past& p.p. leapt pr. lept, or leaped). =jump (still in poet., literary, & dignified use; look before you l.); l.-frog, (n.) game in which players vault with parted legs over others bending down, (vb) perform such vault (over). Hence leaper n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. Jump (by which wd it is now replaced in ordinary use; l. in the dark, hazardous attempt of doubtful issue; by ll. & bounds, with startlingly rapid progress); thing to be jumped; l. day, 29th Feb.; l. year, year with intercalary day (perh. because fixed festivals after Feb. fall in the year after l. y. two weekdays, instead of as usual one, later than in the preceding year). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. (of woman to man, allowable only in l. year). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  45. n. Act of leaping; a jump; a spring; a bound;— space passed by leaping;— a hazardous or venturesome act;— copulation. Cabinet Dictionary

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