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Definitions of leap

  1. To spring upward or forward; to jump; to rault; to rush with force. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To spring over or off the ground; jump; bound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To pass over by a leap or jump; as, to leap a wall, or a ditch. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To copulate with (a female beast); to cover. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To cause to leap; as, to leap a horse across a ditch. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To pass over by a bound or jump; as, to leap a ditch; to cause to jump or spring over; as, to leap a horse over a hedge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To spring or bound over:-pr.p. leaping; pa.t. leaped or leapt (lept); pa.p. leaped, rarely leapt. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. To spring clear of the ground, with the feet; to jump; to vault; as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To spring or move suddenly, as by a jump or by jumps; to bound; to move swiftly. Also Fig. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To jump or spring; as, to leap from a wall; to vault; to bound suddenly; as, my heart leaps up. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To move with springs or bounds: to spring upward or forward: to jump: to rush with vehemence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. To spring; jump; rush forward. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. pass abruptly from one state or topic to another; "leap into fame"; "jump to a conclusion" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. cause to jump or leap, as of a trained animal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. To spring or bound over; to cause to leap. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. To spring or rise from the ground; to jump; to pass over with a spring or bound. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. an abrupt transition; "a successful leap from college to the major leagues" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. a sudden and decisive increase; "a jump in attendance" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. the distance leaped (or to be leaped); "a leap of 10 feet" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. cause to jump or leap; "the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. A weel or wicker trap for fish. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The act of leaping, or the space passed by leaping; a jump; a spring; a bound. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Copulation with, or coverture of, a female beast. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A fault. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A passing from one note to another by an interval, especially by a long one, or by one including several other and intermediate intervals. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The act of passing over with a bound; a jump; a spring; the space passed over in jumping. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. Leaper. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Act of leaping: bound: space passed by leaping: sudden transition. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Act of leaping; space leaped over. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. Leaped or leapt (lept). The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. The act of leaping; a jump; bound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. A jump; a bound; space passed by leaping; copulation of animals; an abrupt transition. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. A jump; a spring; a bound; space passed by leaping. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. Leaped, leapt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

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Usage examples for leap

  1. She will take her leap and have her jump, will and will! – The Short Works of George Meredith by George Meredith Last Updated: March 7, 2009
  2. But I seed the shape of a man leap for my place. – Every Man for Himself by Norman Duncan
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