Spellcheck.net

Definitions of let

  1. To be leased. To let on, to show knowledge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To permit; give leave to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To hire; rent; be leased or hired. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To retard; to hinder; to impede; to oppose. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To leave; to relinquish; to abandon. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To consider; to think; to esteem. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To cause; to make; - used with the infinitive in the active form but in the passive sense; as, let make, i. e., cause to be made; let bring, i. e., cause to be brought. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To permit; to allow; to suffer; - either affirmatively, by positive act, or negatively, by neglecting to restrain or prevent. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To allow to be used or occupied for a compensation; to lease; to rent; to hire out; - often with out; as, to let a farm; to let a house; to let out horses. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To give, grant, or assign, as a work, privilege, or contract; - often with out; as, to let the building of a bridge; to let out the lathing and the plastering. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To permit; grant to a tenant; lease; give out on contract; allow to be done. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. To slacken or loose restraint upon: to give leave or power to: to allow, permit, suffer: to grant to a tenant or hirer:-pr.p. letting; pa.t. and pa.p. let. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. (B.) To prevent: to hinder. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. To permit; allow; grant to a hirer; in Scripture, to hinder. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. To hinder or impede; obstruct; oppose. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. To forbear. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To be let or leased; as, the farm lets for $500 a year. See note under Let, v. t. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. give permission; "She permitted her son to visit her estranged husband"; "I won't let the police search her basement"; "I cannot allow you to see your exam" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. cause to move; cause to be in a certain position or condition; "He got his squad on the ball"; "This let me in for a big surprise"; "He got a girl into trouble" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. grant use or occupation of under a term of contract; "I am leasing my country estate to some foreigners" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. leave unchanged; "let it be" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. actively cause something to happen; "I let it be known that I was not interested" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. To allow, permit, or suffer; to give leave or power to; to lease; to grant possession and use for a compensation; in the imperative, followed by the first and third persons, it expresses desiro or wish; by the first person plural, exhortation or entreaty; by the third person, it implies permission or command addressed to an inferior. To let alone, to suffer to remain without intermeddling. To let down, to permit to sink or fall; to lower. To let loose, to free from restraint. To let in or into, to permit to enter. To let blood, to open a vein and suffer the blood to flow out. To let out, to suffer to escape; to lease or let to hire. To let off, to discharge; to let fly or cause to explode. To let fly, to send forth or discharge with violence, as an arrow or stone. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To allow, suffer, or permit; to grant to a tenant; to put to hire; to give power or leave to; to leave. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. To impede; to obstruct; to hinder-in this sense used as a noun, in the phrase, "without let or hindrance". Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. A termination forming diminutives from French and English nouns; as, gimlet, tablet. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Letting. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. consent to, give permission; "She permitted her son to visit her estranged husband"; "I won't let the police search her basement"; "I cannot allow you to see your exam" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  29. A stroke in which a ball touches the top of the net in passing over. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A retarding; hindrance; obstacle; impediment; delay; - common in the phrase without let or hindrance, but elsewhere archaic. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. (law) Hinderance, obstruction: delay. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. Hindrance; delay. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. That which hinders; an obstacle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. A retarding; hindrance. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. of Let Webster Dictionary DB
  36. Let. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. To let alone, to suffer to remain; to let be, to leave off; to discontinue; to let go; to let blood, to free it from its confinement; to suffer it to flow out of the vein; to let down, to lower; to permit to sink; to let drive or fly, to send forth or discharge with violence, as a stone; to let in, to allow to enter; to insert, as a piece of wood; to let into, to give admission; to make acquainted with; to let loose, to free from restraint; to let off, to discharge, as an arrow or gun; to release, as from an engagement; to suffer to escape; to let on, in Scot., to seem to observe anything; to mention a thing; to let out, to suffer to escape; to give to hire or farm. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for let?

Usage examples for let

  1. Let us have it out. – Roderick Hudson by Henry James
  2. Let me see how it was done. – Walter Sherwood's Probation by Horatio Alger
X