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Definitions of let

  1. give permission; "She permitted her son to visit her estranged husband"; "I won't let the police search her basement"; "I cannot allow you to see your exam" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. make it possible through a specific action or lack of action for something to happen; "This permits the water to rush in"; "This sealed door won't allow the water come into the basement"; "This will permit the rain to run off" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. cause to move; cause to be in a certain position or condition; "He got his squad on the ball"; "This let me in for a big surprise"; "He got a girl into trouble" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. grant use or occupation of under a term of contract; "I am leasing my country estate to some foreigners" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a serve that strikes the net before falling into the receiver's court; the ball must be served again Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. leave unchanged; "let it be" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. actively cause something to happen; "I let it be known that I was not interested" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the most brutal terrorist group active in Kashmir; fights against India with the goal of restoring Islamic rule of India; "Lashkar-e-Toiba has committed mass murders of civilian Hindus" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. consent to, give permission; "She permitted her son to visit her estranged husband"; "I won't let the police search her basement"; "I cannot allow you to see your exam" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. To retard; to hinder; to impede; to oppose. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A stroke in which a ball touches the top of the net in passing over. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To leave; to relinquish; to abandon. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To consider; to think; to esteem. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To forbear. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To be let or leased; as, the farm lets for $500 a year. See note under Let, v. t. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. of Lette Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A retarding; hindrance; obstacle; impediment; delay; - common in the phrase without let or hindrance, but elsewhere archaic. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To cause; to make; - used with the infinitive in the active form but in the passive sense; as, let make, i. e., cause to be made; let bring, i. e., cause to be brought. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To permit; to allow; to suffer; - either affirmatively, by positive act, or negatively, by neglecting to restrain or prevent. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To allow to be used or occupied for a compensation; to lease; to rent; to hire out; - often with out; as, to let a farm; to let a house; to let out horses. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To give, grant, or assign, as a work, privilege, or contract; - often with out; as, to let the building of a bridge; to let out the lathing and the plastering. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Rate of energy dissipation along the path of charged particles. In radiobiology and health physics, exposure is measured in kiloelectron volts per micrometer of tissue (keV/micrometer T). Medical Dictionary DB
  23. To hinder. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To permit; grant to a tenant; lease; give out on contract; allow to be done. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Let. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Letting. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To slacken or loose restraint upon: to give leave or power to: to allow, permit, suffer: to grant to a tenant or hirer:-pr.p. letting; pa.t. and pa.p. let. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. (B.) To prevent: to hinder. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. (law) Hinderance, obstruction: delay. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. Hindrance; delay. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To permit; allow; grant to a hirer; in Scripture, to hinder. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To permit; give leave to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. To hire; rent; be leased or hired. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. To hinder or impede; obstruct; oppose. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. That which hinders; an obstacle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A termination forming diminutives from French and English nouns; as, gimlet, tablet. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A retarding; hindrance. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To allow, permit, or suffer; to give leave or power to; to lease; to grant possession and use for a compensation; in the imperative, followed by the first and third persons, it expresses desiro or wish; by the first person plural, exhortation or entreaty; by the third person, it implies permission or command addressed to an inferior. To let alone, to suffer to remain without intermeddling. To let down, to permit to sink or fall; to lower. To let loose, to free from restraint. To let in or into, to permit to enter. To let blood, to open a vein and suffer the blood to flow out. To let out, to suffer to escape; to lease or let to hire. To let off, to discharge; to let fly or cause to explode. To let fly, to send forth or discharge with violence, as an arrow or stone. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To be leased. To let on, to show knowledge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. of Let Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To allow, suffer, or permit; to grant to a tenant; to put to hire; to give power or leave to; to leave. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. To let alone, to suffer to remain; to let be, to leave off; to discontinue; to let go; to let blood, to free it from its confinement; to suffer it to flow out of the vein; to let down, to lower; to permit to sink; to let drive or fly, to send forth or discharge with violence, as a stone; to let in, to allow to enter; to insert, as a piece of wood; to let into, to give admission; to make acquainted with; to let loose, to free from restraint; to let off, to discharge, as an arrow or gun; to release, as from an engagement; to suffer to escape; to let on, in Scot., to seem to observe anything; to mention a thing; to let out, to suffer to escape; to give to hire or farm. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. To impede; to obstruct; to hinder-in this sense used as a noun, in the phrase, "without let or hindrance". Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. Rent real estate to a tenant. Contrast to subletting. Here the tenant rents the property to a different tenant. thelawdictionary.org
  45. A retarding; hindrance; obstacle; impediment; delay; -- common in the phrase without let or hindrance, but elsewhere archaic. mso.anu.edu.au
  46. To cause; to make; -- used with the infinitive in the active form but in the passive sense; as, let make, i. e., cause to be made; let bring, i. e., cause to be brought. mso.anu.edu.au
  47. To permit; to allow; to suffer; -- either affirmatively, by positive act, or negatively, by neglecting to restrain or prevent. mso.anu.edu.au
  48. To allow to be used or occupied for a compensation; to lease; to rent; to hire out; -- often with out; as, to let a farm; to let a house; to let out horses. mso.anu.edu.au
  49. To give, grant, or assign, as a work, privilege, or contract; -- often with out; as, to let the building of a bridge; to let out the lathing and the plastering. mso.anu.edu.au
  50. A retarding; hindrance; obstacle; impediment; delay; common in the phrase without let or hindrance, but elsewhere archaic. dictgcide_fs
  51. To cause; to make; used with the infinitive in the active form but in the passive sense; as, let make, i. e., cause to be made; let bring, i. e., cause to be brought. dictgcide_fs
  52. To permit; to allow; to suffer; either affirmatively, by positive act, or negatively, by neglecting to restrain or prevent. dictgcide_fs
  53. To allow to be used or occupied for a compensation; to lease; to rent; to hire out; often with out; as, to let a farm; to let a house; to let out horses. dictgcide_fs
  54. To give, grant, or assign, as a work, privilege, or contract; often with out; as, to let the building of a bridge; to let out the lathing and the plastering. dictgcide_fs
  55. let, v.t. to slacken or loose restraint upon: to give leave or power to: to allow, permit, suffer: to grant to a tenant or hirer: to cause (with infin. without to):--pr.p. let'ting; pa.t. and pa.p. let.--n. a letting for hire.--ns. LET'TER; LET'TING.--LET ALONE, to leave out, not to mention.--adj. passive, inactive--also n. (Shak.) forbearance.--LET BLOOD, to open a vein and let the blood run out; LET DOWN, to allow to fall: to bring down; LET GO, to cease holding: to pass by or disregard; LET IN, to allow to enter: to take in or swindle; LET INTO, to admit to the knowledge of; LET OFF, to allow to go free without punishment, to excuse from payment, &c.; LET ON, to allow a thing to be believed, to pretend; LET ONE'S SELF LOOSE, to let go restraint on words or actions, to indulge in extravagant talk or conduct; LET OUT, to allow to get free, to let some secret become known; LET SLIP, to allow to escape: to lose sight of; LET WELL ALONE, to let things remain as they are from fear of making them worse. [A.S. l['æ]tan, to permit, pt.t. lét, leót, pp. læten; Ger. lassen, Fr. laisser, to permit.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  56. let, v.t. (B.) to prevent.--n. (law) hinderance, obstruction: delay.--n. LET'TER. [A.S. lettan, to hinder--læt, slow.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  57. (archaic; letted or let), & n. Hinder, obstruct. (N.) stoppage, hindrance, (archaic); (Rackets &c.) obstruction of ball in certain ways, requiring it to be served again. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. (let), & n. 1. v.t.: Allow (liquid, air) to escape (l. blood); grant use of for rent or hire (also intr. in pass. sense, as the rooms l. well; to l., offered for rent; noun, letting, as cannot get a l. for the rooms); allow to, suffer to, (we let them go; I was let see him; pass. now rare, & sometimes followed by to); cause to (only in l. one know, inform him). Latin alone, not interfere with, attend to, or do (l. well a.; l. one a. to do, he may be trusted to; l. a. imperat., not to mention, far less or more); l. be, not interfere with, attend to, or do; l. down, lower, disappoint (l. him d. gently, avoid humiliating abruptly), (n.) disappointment; l. drive; l. fall, drop (lit., & fig. hint, significant word) intentionally or by accident, (Geom.) draw (perpendicular) from outside point (up)on line; l. fly; l. go, release, set at liberty, lose hold of, lose or relinquish hold of, dismiss from thought, cease to restrain (l. one self go, give way to enthusiasm, impulse, &c.); l. in, admit or open door to (l. in a flood of light; this would l. in all sorts of evils; l. oneself in, with latchkey &c.), insert into surface of something, involve in loss or difficulty (often for); l. (trans.) into, admit to, insert into surface of, make acquainted with (secret &c.); l. (intr. or abs.) into, assail with blows or words; l. loose, release or unchain (dog, fury, maniac, &c.); l. off adv., discharge (gun, & fig. joke &c.), not punish or compel, punish with light penalty, allow or cause (fluid, fumes, &c.) to pass away, (n.) being allowed to escape something undesirable (esp. in cricket, not being caught &c. when there is a chance); l. off prep., excuse (person penalty); let on slang, peach, reveal secret; l. (trans.) out, open door for exit to, allow (person &c., secret) to escape (l. cat out of bag), make (garment) looser, put out to hire esp. to several tenants, divulge (often that); l. (intr. or abs.) out, strike out with fist, lash out with heels, use strong language; l. slip, loose from leash, miss (opportunity). 2. v. aux. supplying 1st& 3rd persons of imperat. in exhortations (l. us pray; l. you& me try now), commands (l. it be done, l. him do it, at once), assumptions (l. A B be equal to CD), & permissions (l. him do his worst). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. (ringlet, streamlet), but somet. denoting articles of attire or ornament (armlet, frontlet); -let appears to come f. wrong division of wds taken f. OF diminutives in which -et (e) is added to nn. in -el (f. L-ellus, -ella, -ellum, dim. suff., or L-ale neut. adj. used as n.), as chaplet, hamlet, f. old French chapelet, hamelet, dimm. of chapel, hamel, mod. F chapeau, hameau. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. (as used in Collect for Fourth Sunday in Advent, and often in legal conveyances). To impede, keep back [A.S.]. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  61. n. A hinderance; obstacle; impediment. Cabinet Dictionary

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