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Definitions of lieutenant

  1. an assistant with power to act when his superior is absent Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an officer holding a commissioned rank in the United States Navy or Coast Guard; below lieutenant commander and above lieutenant junior grade Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an officer in a police force Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a commissioned military officer Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an officer holding a commissioned rank in the United States Navy or the United States Coast Guard; below lieutenant commander and above lieutenant junior grade Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. An officer who supplies the place of a superior in his absence; a representative of, or substitute for, another in the performance of any duty. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A commissioned officer in the army, next below a captain. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A commissioned officer in the British navy, in rank next below a commander. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A commissioned officer in the United States navy, in rank next below a lieutenant commander. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. An officer ranking next below a captain in the army and a lieutenant commander in the navy; one who acts for a superior in his absence; lieutenant colonel, an army officer next in rank above a major, and below a colonel; lieutenant general, an army officer next in rank above a major general, and below a general. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. An officer holding the place of another in his absence: a commissioned officer in the army next below a captain, or in the navy next below a commander: one holding a place next in rank to a superior, as in the compounds lieutenant-colonel, lieutenant-general. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. A deputy; commissioned officer next below a captain. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. An officer empowered to act in place of a superior; deputy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. A commissioned officer next below a captain in the army or a commander in the navy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. An officer who supplies the place of a superior in his absence; a commissioned officer next below a captain; the officer next in rank to the commander; one in rank next, as lieutenant-colonel. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. A deputy; one holding a place next in rank to a superior; the second officer of a company of soldiers or man-of-war; a commissioned officer next in rank to a captain. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. any debt or d_ity; every such claim or charge remaining a lieu on the property, although not in the possession of the person' to whom the debt or duty is due. Downer v. Brackett, 21 Vt. 002, l-'eil. Cas. No. 4,043. And see Trust v. Pirsson, 1 Ililt. (N. Y.) 200; In re Byrne (D. C.) 07 Fed. 704; Storm v. Waddell. 2 Sandf. Ch. (N. Y.) 507; Stansbury v. Patent Cloth Mfg. Co., 5 N. J. Law, 441; The Meno- ininie (D. C.) 30 Fed. 199; Mobile B. & L. Ass'n v. Robertson, 05 Ala. 382; The J. E. Iiumbell, 148 U. S. 1, 13 Sup. Ct. 498, 37 L. Ed. 345. In the Scotch law, the doctrine of lien is known by the name of "retention," and that of set-off by the name of "compensation." The Roman or civil law embraces under the head of "mortgage and privilege" the peculiar securities which, in the common and maritime law and equity, are termed "liens." Classification. Liens are either particular or general. The former is a right to retain a tiling for some charge or claim growing out of, or connected with, the identical thing. A general lien is a right to detain a chattel, etc., until payment be made, not only of any debt due in respect of the particular chattel, but of any balance that may be due on general account in the same line of business. A general lien, being against the ordinary rule of law, depends entirely upon contract, express or implied, from the special usage of dealing between the parties. Wharton. Crommelin v. Railroad Co., 10 Bosw. (N. Y.) 80; McKenzie v. Nevius, 22 Me. 150, 38 Am. Dec. 291 ; Brooks v. Bryce, 21 Wend. (N. Y.) 10. A spccial lien is in the nature of a particular lien, being a lien upon particular property; a lien which the holder can enforce only as security for the performance of a particular act or obligation and of obligations incidental thereto. Green v. Coast Line It. Co., 97 Ga. 15, 24 S. E 814, 33 L. R. A. 800. 54 Am. St. Rep. 379; Civ. Code Cal. 1903, thelawdictionary.org
  18. (only in A.V. Esther 3:12 ; 8:9 ; 9:3 ; Ezra 8:36 ), a governor or viceroy of a Persian province having both military and civil power. Correctly rendered in the Revised Version "satrap." biblestudytools.com
  19. lef-ten'ant, n. one representing or performing the work of another: an officer holding the place of another in his absence: a commissioned officer in the army next below a captain, or in the navy next below a commander and ranking with captain in the army: one holding a place next in rank to a superior, as in the compounds LIEUTEN'ANT-COL'ONEL, LIEUTEN'ANT-GEN'ERAL.--ns. LIEUTEN'ANCY, LIEUTEN'ANTSHIP, office or commission of a lieutenant: the body of lieutenants; LIEUTEN'ANT-GOV'ERNOR, in India, the name of the chief official in the provinces of Bengal, Behar, and Orissa, the North-western Provinces, and Oudh, Punjab, and Delhi; LIEUTEN'ANT-GOV'ERNORSHIP; LIEUTEN'ANTRY (Shak.), lieutenancy; LORD'-LIEUTEN'ANT, the title of the viceroy of Ireland: in the British Isles, a permanent governor of a county appointed by the sovereign, usually a peer or other large land-owner, at the head of the magistracy and the chief executive authority; SUB'-LIEUTEN'ANT, formerly mate or passed midshipman, now the intermediate rank in the navy between midshipman and lieutenant.--FIELD-MARSHAL LIEUTENANT (see FIELD-MARSHAL). [Fr.; cf. Lieu and Tenant.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  20. (abbr. Lieut. & in comb. Lt-). Deputy, substitute, vicegerent, acting for a superior (still as formal title in Latin of the tower, acting commandant of Tower of London; & see lord-l.); officer next below captain in army or commander in navy; l.-colonel (cy), (position of) officer ranking next to colonel& with actual command of regiment; l.-general, officer ranking below general& above major-general; l.-governor-( ship), (position of) actual governor of district &c. in subordination to governor-general. Hence lieutenancy n. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  21. In colonial Virginia the leading officer of a county, corresponding to the lord-lieutenant of an English county. His duties were to enroll and lead the militia, and also to supervise the administration of the tobacco laws and hold a court for minor offences. Dictionary of United States history
  22. See Rank. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  23. n. [French] An officer, either civil or military, who supplies the place of a superior in his absence;— a commissioned officer in the army next below a captain;— a commissioned officer in the navy next in rank below commander. Cabinet Dictionary

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