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Definitions of literature

  1. published writings in a particular style on a particular subject; "the technical literature"; "one aspect of Waterloo has not yet been treated in the literature" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the profession or art of a writer; "her place in literature is secure" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the humanistic study of a body of literature; "he took a course in French literature" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. creative writing of recognized artistic value Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the humanistic study of a body of literature; "he took a course in Russian lit" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. Learning; acquaintance with letters or books. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The collective body of literary productions, embracing the entire results of knowledge and fancy preserved in writing; also, the whole body of literary productions or writings upon a given subject, or in reference to a particular science or branch of knowledge, or of a given country or period; as, the literature of Biblical criticism; the literature of chemistry. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. The class of writings distinguished for beauty of style or expression, as poetry, essays, or history, in distinction from scientific treatises and works which contain positive knowledge; belles-lettres. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The occupation, profession, or business of doing literary work. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Writings having excellence of form or expression and expressing ideas of permanent or universal interest. The body of written works produced in a particular language, country, or age. (Webster, 3d ed) Medical Dictionary DB
  11. The written or printed productions of a country or period, especially those that are notable for beauty or force of style. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. The science of letters or what is written: the whole body of literary compositions in any language, or on a given subject: all literary productions except those relating to positive science and art, usually confined, however, to the belles-lettres. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. Science of letters or learning; body of literary works. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. Written or printed works of superior merit; learning. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. Acquaintance with books; the collective body of literary productions of a country or an age, in general or in some special department; in a special sense, that body of literary compositions which, to the exclusion of merely philosophical, scientific, and technical works, are occupied mainly with that which is spiritual in its nature and imaginative in its form, whether in the world of fact or the world of fiction; the profession of letters; belles letters. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. Written compositions, except those on science or art; writings or productions on a given subject; acquaintance with books; learning. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. lit'[.e]r-a-t[=u]r, n. the science of letters or what is written: the whole body of literary compositions in any language, or on a given subject: all literary productions except those relating to positive science and art, usually confined, however, to the belles-lettres.--adj. LIT'ERATURED (Shak.), learned, having literary knowledge.--LIGHT LITERATURE, books which can be read and understood without mental exertion: fiction; POLITE LITERATURE, belles-lettres. [Fr.,--L. literatura--litera, a letter.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  18. Literary culture (archaic); literary production (engaged in l.), the literary profession (l. was represented by-); realm of letters, writings of country or period; writings whose value lies in beauty of form or emotional effect (LIGHT l.); the books treating of a subject; (colloq.) printed matter. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  19. n. [Latin] Learning; acquaintance with letters or books; skill, art, or grace in composition; literary style;— the body of literary productions in a country or nation, or in a particular age or period;— especially, such literary compositions as depend for their effect largely on style and diction; belles lettres; critical essays; poetry, &c., as opposed to scientific productions. Cabinet Dictionary

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