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Definitions of live

  1. To have life; to continue in life; to spend life; to dwell or reside; to enjoy life; to subsist; to be nourished and supported in life; to gain a livelihood; to subsist spiritually. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To spend, as one's life; to pass; to maintain; to continue in, constantly or habitually; as, to live an idle or a useful life. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To act habitually in conformity with; to practice. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To pass spend; as, to live a happy life. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To spend: to act in conformity to:-pr.p. living; pa.t. and pa.p. lived. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To spend; pass, as time or life. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To make one's abiding place or home; to abide; to dwell; to reside. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To enjoy or make the most of life; to be in a state of happiness. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To have a spiritual existence; to be quickened, nourished, and actuated by divine influence or faith. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To be or continue in existence; to exist; to remain; to be permanent; to last; - said of inanimate objects, ideas, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To feed; to subsist; to be nourished or supported; - with on; as, horses live on grass and grain. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To be maintained in life; to acquire a livelihood; to subsist; - with on or by; as, to live on spoils. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To outlast danger; to float; - said of a ship, boat, etc.; as, no ship could live in such a storm. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To exist or have life; pass life; as, to live happily; reside; as, live in a house; to get support or to sub; as, to live on meat; to continue to e life; as, to live to be old. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To have life: to continue in life: to be exempt from death: to last: to subsist: to enjoy life, to be in a state of happiness: to be nourished or supported: to dwell. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. To have life; exist; last; subsist; dwell; pass one's time. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. have life, be alive; "Our great leader is no more"; "My grandfather lived until the end of war" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. continue to live; endure or last; "We went without water and food for 3 days"; "These superstitions survive in the backwaters of America"; "The racecar driver lived through several very serious accidents" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. support oneself; "he could barely exist on such a low wage"; "Can you live on $2000 a month in New York City?"; "Many people in the world have to subsist on $1 a day" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. have firsthand knowledge of states, situations, emotions, or sensations; "I know the feeling!"; "have you ever known hunger?"; "I have lived a kind of hell when I was a drug addict"; "The holocaust survivors have lived a nightmare"; "I lived through two divorces" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. lead a certain kind of life; live in a certain style; "we had to live frugally after the war" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. To spend; to conform to. To live down, to put down by one's manner of living. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. To exist or have being; to feed or subsist; to continue in; to dwell; to have a settled residence in any place; to reside with; to continue or endure; to flourish; to remain undestroyed; in Scrip., to be exempt from spiritual death; to attain or approach to immortality. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  24. LIVER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. not recorded; "the opera was broadcast live" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. (electricity) charged or energized with electricity; "a hot wire"; "a live wire" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. showing characteristics of life; exerting force or containing energy; "live coals"; "tossd a live cigarette out the window"; "got a shock from a live wire"; "live ore is unmined ore"; "a live bomb"; "a live ball is one in play" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. of current relevance; "a live issue"; "still a live option" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. (printing) in current use or ready for use; "live copy is ready to be set in type or already set but not yet proofread" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. (informal) abounding with life and energy; "the club members are a really live bunch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. highly reverberant; "a live concert hall" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. pursue a positive and satisfying existence; "You must accept yourself and others if you really want to live" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  33. make one's home or live in; "She resides officially in Iceland"; "I live in a 200-year old house"; "These people inhabited all the islands that are now deserted"; "The plains are sparsely populated" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  34. having life; "a live canary"; "hit a live nerve"; "famous living painters"; "living tissue"; Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. showing characteristics of life; exerting force or containing energy; "live coals"; "tossed a live cigarette out the window"; "got a shock from a live wire"; "live ore is unmined ore"; "a live bomb"; "a live ball is one in play" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. charged or energized with electricity; "a hot wire"; "a live wire" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  37. in current use or ready for use; "live copy is ready to be set in or already set but not yet proofread" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  38. abounding with life and energy; "the club members are a really live bunch" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  39. actually being performed at the time of hearing or viewing; "a live television program"; "brought to you live from Lincoln Center"; "live entertainment involves performers actually in the physical presence of a live audience" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  40. charged with an explosive; "live ammunition"; "a live bomb" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  41. To be alive; to have life; to have, as an animal or a plant, the capacity of assimilating matter as food, and to be dependent on such assimilation for a continuance of existence; as, animals and plants that live to a great age are long in reaching maturity. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. Having life; alive; living; not dead. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. Being in a state of ignition; burning; having active properties; as, a live coal; live embers. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. Full of earnestness; active; wide awake; glowing; as, a live man, or orator. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. Vivid; bright. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. Imparting power; having motion; as, the live spindle of a lathe. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. (liv), ing life; burning; as, a live coal; full activity or interest; as, a live topic. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  48. Having life: alive, not dead: active: containing fire: burning: vivid. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  49. Living; active; burning. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  50. Alive; quick; alert. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. Having life; living; not dead; on fire; ignited; vivid. Live-feathers, or hair, feathers or hair plucked from the living animal. Live-oak, a species of oak very durable, and highly esteemed for ship-timber. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. Having life; not dead; active. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for live?

Usage examples for live

  1. What am I to live on, my dear fellow? – The Bertrams by Anthony Trollope
  2. Only maybe you'll let me live with you now and then. – The Gray Mask by Wadsworth Camp
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